February 9, 1932

FISH INSPECTION ACT


Hon. ALFRED DURANLEA-U (Acting Minister of Fisheries) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 6, to amend the Fish Inspection Act.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   FISH INSPECTION ACT
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CON

Alfred Duranleau (Minister of Fisheries; Minister of Marine)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DURANLEAU:

The act requires that barrels or other containers of such fish as come under its provisions shall be made in accordance with the defined standards, that the fish be cured, graded and packed as prescribed in the regulations, and that the packer

62 COMMONS

Public Service-Salary Deduction

place marks on the containers to represent correctly the kind, grade and weight of contents. At the present time inspectors are not required to inspect and mark every barrel or container. The purpose of this amendment is to make obligatory the inspection of all fish and containers which come under the provisions of this act and to prohibit their sale or shipment unless inspected and properly marked. This amendment is demanded by different associations.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   FISH INSPECTION ACT
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CITY OF OTTAWA AGREEMENT


Hon. H. A. STEWART (Minister of Public Works) moved that the house go into committee at the next sitting to consider the following proposed resolution: That it is expedient to authorize the Minister of Public Works, on behalf of His Majesty, to enter into an agreement with the Corporation of the City of Ottawa to extend the period of the existing agreement with the corporation for one year from 1st July, 1931. He said: His Excellency the Governor General, having been made acquainted with the subject matter of this resolution, recommends it to the favourable consideration of the house. Motion agreed to.


THE PUBLIC SERVICE

PROPOSED TEN PER CENT DEDUCTION IN INDEMNITIES AND SALARIES-CONTRIBUTION BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR GENERAL


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

Mr. Speaker, before the orders of

the day are proceeded with I desire to make a short statement.

With respect to the statement which I made last evening regarding the reduction in the salaries paid to the members of the public service, I desire to inform the house that some time ago His Excellency the Governor General intimated that, if any reductions were made in the salaries paid to the members of the public service of Canada, he desired, as a voluntary act, to make the same contribution to the treasury as though his salary were included in the reduction, and he also so informed His Majesty the King.

I respectfully took the opposite view, and informed His Excellency that inasmuch as his salary was fixed by section 105 of the British North America Act, I did not think that any contribution of the kind suggested should be

made. His Excellency now informs me that, notwithstanding the view which I so strongly pressed, he is firmly of the opinion that he should be permitted to share in the sacrifice involved in the reduction of salaries paid to the members of the Canadian public service, and I have agreed with his insistent view. During the new fiscal year His Excellency will voluntarily contribute to the treasury a proportion of his salary', equivalent to any reduction that may be imposed by statute upon the members of the public service of the country.

Topic:   THE PUBLIC SERVICE
Subtopic:   PROPOSED TEN PER CENT DEDUCTION IN INDEMNITIES AND SALARIES-CONTRIBUTION BY HIS EXCELLENCY THE GOVERNOR GENERAL
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AUSTRALIAN WHEAT SHIPMENT


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Thomas Reid

Liberal

Mr. THOMAS REID (New Westminster):

I should like, Mr. Speaker, to direct a question to the hon. Minister of National Revenue (Mr. Ryckman). According to press despatches, a shipment of some two hundred and fifty tons of Australian wheat to the city of Vancouver for the use of the poultry industry has been refused admittance. Will the minister kindly give the reason for such refusal?

Topic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT SHIPMENT
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CON

Edmond Baird Ryckman (Minister of National Revenue)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. E. B. RYCKMAN (Minister of National Revenue):

This is the first intimation

that I have had of the subject matter upon which the inquiry is made by the hon. gentleman. I understand that the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Weir) can give an explanation, and I would ask that he should do so.

Topic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT SHIPMENT
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. ROBERT WEIR (Minister of Agriculture) :

Mr. Speaker, I take it that the hon. member refers to a cargo of Australian wheat unloaded in Vancouver some few days ago. There is a wheat disease in Australia known as flag smut, and it is against the regulations of this country for any wheat to be admitted from any territory in Australia that is infected with the disease. The only way in which we can protect ourselves is to require that any shipment of wheat from Australia shall be accompanied by a certificate from the Australian authorities that the wheat comes from a district not so infected. No certificate has been produced covering this shipment. The authorities in Vancouver did not want in any way to embarrass the shippers, and we got in touch with the Australian government and asked if they would cable a certificate for the release of the wheat. They had not seen fit to do so. In the meantime the wheat has been unloaded and is being held in quarantine.

Transportation Commission

Topic:   AUSTRALIAN WHEAT SHIPMENT
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TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION


On the orders of the day: Mr. CAMERON R. McINTOSH (North Battleford): Mr. Speaker, I should like to ask the Prime Minister if the Royal Commission on Railways and Transportation will make its final report during this session? In the speech from the throne it is intimated that the commission is only likely to do so. If such a report is to be submitted can the Prime Minister give the approximate date when it may be expected; and can he also inform the house and country whether the commission will hold any further sittings before taking final action?


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

It is obvious, Mr. Speaker, that I can give no answer to the question. I have no advices as to when the commission will complete its labours, or as to whether or not it desires in the public interest, for the purpose of informing itself, to hold further meetings.

Topic:   TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION
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MAFEKING CUT-OFF


On the orders of the day:


February 9, 1932