February 5, 1932

VACANCY

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform the house that during the recess I received communications from two members, notifying me that the following vacancy had occurred in the representation, viz:

Of John Francis Buckley, member for the electoral district of Athabaska, by decease.

I accordingly issued my warrant to the chief electoral officer to make out new writs of election for the said electoral district.

Topic:   VACANCY
Permalink

NEW MEMBERS

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that the clerk of the house has received from the chief electoral officer certificates of the election and return of the following members, viz:

41761-X

Of Charles Bourgeois, Esquire, for the electoral district of Three Rivers-St. Maurice.

Of Humphrey Mitchell, Esquire, for the electoral district of Hamilton East.

Topic:   NEW MEMBERS
Permalink

NEW MEMBERS INTRODUCED


Charles Bourgeois, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Three Rivers-St. Maurice, introduced by Right Hon. R. B. Bennett and Hon. Mr. Guthrie. Humphrey Mitchell, Esquire, member for the electoral district of Hamilton East, introduced by J. S. Woodsworth and A. A. Heaps.


OATHS OF OFFICE .


Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 1, respecting the administration of oaths of office. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform the house that when the house did attend His Excellency the Governor General this day in the Senate chamber, His Excellency was pleased to make a speech to both houses of parliament. To prevent mistakes I have obtained a copy which is as follows:

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

In addressing you for the first time, I desire to express my gratification at having been selected by His Majesty as his representative in the Dominion of Canada, and to acknowledge with profound thanks the reception which has been accorded to me by the people of this country. I accept it as a proof of their loyalty and devotion to the crown. I shall count it a happiness as well as a duty to associate myself with you in your labours for the welfare of Canada.

You enter upon your duties at a time of continuing and universal economic disturbance and distress. World conditions are beyond the control of the Canadian people. But I rejoice that their resolute adherence to policies designed for the welfare of the nation has minimized the adverse influence of external economic forces. This period of trial has shown the Canadian situation to be fundamentally

Governor General's Speech

sound. The oversubscription of the national service loan manifests both the unity and patriotism of the people, and their supreme confidence in the financial strength of the Dominion. Canada still maintains its high place in world commerce. Within the last few months, a favourable balance of trade has been established. The provisions made at the last session of parliament for unemployment and farm relief are proving effective.

You are successfully meeting difficult domestic problems. Conditions are gradually improving. But prosperity in full measure must await the satisfactory adjustment of accounts between debtor and creditor nations of the world and the restoration of international monetary standards, from which the acute financial difficulties have compelled a temporary departure.

Since the last session of parliament my ministers have commenced negotiations with the government of the United States of America for the completion of the St. Lawrence waterway.

A commission has been appointed to inquire into the whole problem of transportation in Canada. My ministers expect that the report of the commission will be ready for submission to parliament during the present session.

My ministers have under consideration a commercial treaty with the Dominion of New Zealand.

A Canadian delegation is participating in the disarmament conference, which -was opened at Geneva on the 2nd of February. I join with you in the prayer that the representatives of the nations there assembled may reach an understanding which will put beyond peril the cause of enduring world peace.

On the invitation of my government, an economic conference of members of the British commonwealth of nations will meet in Ottawa on July 18th next.

The Geneva Narcotics Convention of 1931, the Red Cross. Prisoners of War and other conventions, will be submitted for your approval.

Among the other measures to which your attention will be invited will be a bill relating to insurance and bills relating to patents and trade marks.

Yrou will also be asked to consider bills to amend the Canada Shipping Act and the Fisheries Act.

Members of the House of Commons:

The public accounts for the last fiscal year and the estimates for the coming year will be submitted at an early date. The estimates will conform to my ministers' determination to maintain a policy of rigid economy, consistent with the discharge of those statutory and contractual obligations, which is essential to the preservation of the integrity and credit of the Dominion.

Honourable Members of the Senate:

Members of the House of Commons:

I sincerely congratulate you on the fortitude and patience with which the people of Canada have borne the hardships of this period of depression and maintained their usual high regard for law and order. A sense of unity more abundantly prevails. The spirit of sympathetic cooperation has been strengthened. The Canadian people have united in the fight against adversity. Prosperity is their just

reward. I know it will be your privilege, by the unselfish and zealous discharge of your duties to hasten its return. May Divine Providence bless and guide you in your deliberations.

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT ' (Prime Minister) moved:

That the speech of His Excellency the Governor General to both houses of parliament be taken into consideration on Monday next.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


SELECT STANDING COMMITTEES

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved:

That a special committee be appointed to prepare and report, with all convenient speed, lists of members to compose the select standing committees of this house under standing order 03, said committee to be composed of Messrs. Rhodes, Duranleau, Simpson (Algoma West), Stewart (Edmonton West), and Casgrain.

Topic:   SELECT STANDING COMMITTEES
Permalink

Motion agreed to.


INTERNAL ECONOMY COMMISSION


Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) presented the following message from His Excellency the Governor General: The Governor General transmits to the House of Commons a certified copy of an approved minute of council, appointing the Honourable E. N. Rhodes, Minister of Finance; the Honourable D. M. Sutherland, Minister of National Defence; the Honourable Alfred Duranleau, Minister of Marine and the Honourable T. G. Murphy. Minister of the Interior and Superintendent General of Indian Affairs, to act writh the Speaker of the House of Commons as commissioners for the purposes and under the provisions of chapter 145 of the revised statutes of Canada, 1927, intituled "An Act respecting the House of Commons."


DEPUTY SERGEANT-AT-ARMS

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to

inform the house that the Sergeant-at-Arms, with my approval, has appointed Lieutenant J. L. Williams to be his deputy during the present session of parliament.

Topic:   DEPUTY SERGEANT-AT-ARMS
Permalink

ADJOURNMENT-BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE


Mr. BENNETT moved the adjournment of the house.


February 5, 1932