July 10, 1931

LIB
CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

If that had been, read to

the immigrants they would have stayed out.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION AND COLONIZATION
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LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

That was published in

192S, two years before the elections. The Hamilton Spectator of November 26, 1928, contained the following:

Lord Melchett Suggests Plan Canada to Grant Land. Britain to Pay Cost

London, November 26.-A suggestion that Canada should make land grants and that Britain should finance settlement schemes on the instalment basis, is made by Lord Melchett, formerly Sir Alfred Mond, who says he would like to see a really big migration movement started which would bring out at least 100,000 people to Canada without undue hindrance.

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?

An hon. MEMBER:

Carried on division.

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LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

My hon. friend would like to have the item carry, but I intend to put a few more things on record before it is carried. This is the kind of propaganda indulged in by politicians, and which has been supported by politicians for the last few years.

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CON

Wesley Ashton Gordon (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GORDON:

What politicians?

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LIB
CON

Wesley Ashton Gordon (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GORDON:

It conveys nothing to my mind when the hon. member says "politicians."

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LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

Politicians from the Conservative party, one member of which party is over in London representing the spirit, the voice and the soul of the government of the

day.

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?

An hon. MEMBER:

Who is that?

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CON
LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

I hope he does come back, because I lost an asset when he left. Will my hon. friend tell me why he ran away?

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CON
LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

The Port Arthur News

Chronicle, a paper in my part of the country, under date of October 1, 1928, had the following to say:

If Britishers will not come to Canada, we must look elsewhere for men and women who will come. Much of the dominion still remains to be settled. Much work has to be done.

There is work that neither Britishers or Canadians will undertake if they can find other people to perform it. Large employers of labour know this. Thus we see on the railways in extra work, foreign labour with the barest sprinkling of English speaking men among them.

At this point I want to say that that is where the railway companies come in. I refer to both companies; they love to have a surplus ' of this kind of labour in order that they may encourage work at thirty cents an hour for any number of hours they like. They want to pay a wage which will not permit of a decent standard of living. The article continues :

We see the great construction works manned by non-English men in large proportions, simply carrying out instructions issued by the few supervisors. If the Britishers would come and do the work, there would be no necessity for the bringing in of so many non-English speaking men, but they will not come, and Canada cannot cease living until the Englishmen fulfil the original idea of the intention of making Canada a colony for the settlement of Englishmen alone.

The following is from a paper in my own riding, the Rainy River Record. Under date of November 11, 1928, they had this to say:

Saturday Review (London): (The report of the Industrial Transference Board shows that there are at least 250,000 more workmen in the British Isles than can be supported by the industries of the country). The remedy in which the Industrial Transference Board see most hope is in migration to the dominions. It would like to transfer to new careers 200,000 workmen with their families, for the excess of unemployed in the coal mines alone is probably at least 200,000-not one of whom has a chance of reemployment in his old work-and the migration of 200,000 abroad is therefore not an excessive transference, nor would it be throwing on the dominions by any means the whole of our surplus population. Since the war the stream of emigration from this country abroad has almost stopped, and the emigration of even 200,000 would do little more than make ud the accumulated arrears.

In the Montreal Gazette of September 15, 1928, the following appeared:

It is largely because of the Heenan-organized labour attitude that one government after another in Canada has failed to evolve and enforce an immigration policy that will bring immigrants.

I draw this to the attention of the Minister of Immigration in the hope that the Montreal Gazette will not twist that around and say that the Gordon-organized labour attitude of one government after another in Canada has failed to bring immigrants to this country. Under date of March 10, 1928, the following appears in the Montreal Gazette:

Ottawa, March 9.-An impressive and constructive immigration program was submitted to parliament this afternoon by General A. D. McRae (Conservative, North Vancouver) in his

Supply-Immigration

contribution to the budget debate. His plan contemplates "the ultimate settlement ol 60,000,000 acres of land by some 250,000 farmers. These, with their families and the urban population whieh will be required, and the consequent developments which will follow, will add 2,000,000 new people to the prairie provinces of Canada. I propose we start out to double the present population of the west. Do this and the rest of Canada will grow and prosper.''

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CON

Otto Baird Price

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PRICE:

Why is so much of the time of the committee taken up with the useless junk which the hon. gentleman is reading? Why should the committee be held up, at a time when we are trying to get legislation passed, with a reading of numerous newspaper reports? It is absolutely useless and of no interest to the general public at large. It is a nuisance.

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LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

Now that the hon. gentleman has got that off his chest, -let me read something from the Montreal Gazette, quoting what the Toronto Mail and Empire had to say:

We are pleased to learn that General McRae, M.P., North Vancouver, who met with a serious accident in Ottawa last winter, has returned from England completely restored in health. He has for many years taken an active interest in immigration and settlement work, and shortly before his accident, presented a plan which attracted widespread attention. Briefly it was to settle three hundred thousand on fifty million acres of land at a cost of $30,000,000.

The Mail and Empire, which is a Conservative paper, goes on to say:

If, as estimated, it would add two million to our population in ten years the cost does not seem excessive. General McRae's was one of the few really constuctive plans proposed for public consideration, but unfortunately his illness prevented the discussion of it which it deserved.

I would ask the hon. member who has just spoken (Mr. Price) to take up the cudgels where General McRae left off, and advocate now the bringing in of 300,000 people at a cost of $30,000,000 a year to settle on useless land. I defy any hon. member on the government side of the house to get up and say that that is the policy that should be pursued in Canada. Yet they induced thousands of people in the old country to sell their little sticks of furniture and start off for this great, prosperous country of Canada, and) when they got here and could not find employment, we had the spectacle of the Conservatives going up and down this country saying: These are the people that the King government brought over.

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CON

Finlay MacDonald

Conservative (1867-1942)

The CHAIRMAN (Mr. MacDonald, South Cape Breton):

Time is up.

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LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

I am sorry because I am only half through.

Mr. LaVERGNE: I agree entirely with

what my hon. friend said, but I do not think that quoting newspapers puts the responsibility on the right people. I was in the house when I was almost alone in denouncing immigration, and I lived to see the whole Conservative apposition supporting me when I was combating the immigration policy of the Laurier government. Deeds of governments speak louder than quotations ifrom newspapers, which are not responsible to the people. Who brought the immigrants to this country? That is the question. During the Liberal regime of Sir Wilfrid Laurier three million immigrants, paid immigrants, came into this country-advertised immigration, bonused immigration, and sometimes Scandalous immigration. I recall, for instance, the North Atlantic Trading Company. I was in the house in those days, and it was precisely on one of those questions that I separated from that party. It was when the Liberal party was filling up this country with the riff-raff of continental Europe. That was the policy pursued by the Liberal party for at least ten or twelve years, and it was denounced in this house first by the hon. member for Labelle and mysel'f, then by Conservatives from Quebec, and then by the leader of the opposition, Sir Robert Borden, and the whole Conservative party. And it was defended by whom? By Mr. Sifton and Mr. Frank Oliver, then Minister of the Interior and Minister of Immigration respectively. Thus, deeds speak louder than quotations from newspapers, which may be Conservative. My hon. friend quotes the Montreal Gazette. Everybody knows that the Montreal Gazette is the Taschereau organ in the province of Quebec. I do not know that Mr. Taschereau is so much of a Conservative. It may be so, but he is not supposed to be Conservative in the eyes of my hon. friend.

I remember reading to the then Minister of Immigration in the Laurier government a list of twenty-nine new races which had been brought into Canada by the immigration policy of the Laurier government. Those were the days when we had bonused immigration, premiums on immigrants, scandals involving different companies. I remember the North Atlantic Trading Company. You could not name those people because if their names were given out in public some of them would have to commit suicide. But the present Minister of Immigration has put a stop to that policy, which was ruinous to the welfare of our

Supply-Immigration

nation and to the best traditions of both races in this country, and I think the whole house should stand up and thank him for adapting such a policy. .1 have fought the Liberal party's immigration policy for the last twenty-five years, and I have fought many a battle alone. We should look at things squarely, and say that both parties have been guilty, both parties have gone the wrong way, the Liberal party more than the other; but the Conservative party was the first to put a stop to that policy this year.

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Item agreed to. Immigration salaries and contingencies, including grants to immigration societies, women's hostels, provinces, and loans-for stock, equipment, etc., for Canadian boys, as may be authorized by the governor in council, $1,905,000.


LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

I wish the hon. member for Montmagny (Mr. LaVergne) had been in the Conservative party during the last two or three years, because he would have tried to stop this propaganda in the British Isles. I want to say this to him. He said that the Liberal party brought those people here. I say it was the Tory propaganda that brought those people to this country.

Mr. LaVERGNE : There was no Tory government in 1904, 1905 or 1906.

Mr, HEENAN: Let me read what the present Prime Minister said in this house in 1929.

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July 10, 1931