July 10, 1931

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Not published in Canada.

Topic:   BRITISH AMERICAN OIL COMPANY
Subtopic:   MEMORANDUM WITH RESPECT TO COMPANY'S LABOUR POLICY
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LIB

Peter Heenan

Liberal

Mr. HEENAN:

The conditions were reported upon by a Canadian corespondent, who is a very prominent man in this country. When he was making the investigation he had labour men associated with him. I propose when the labour estimates are discussed to bring up on the floor of the house that very same question.

Topic:   BRITISH AMERICAN OIL COMPANY
Subtopic:   MEMORANDUM WITH RESPECT TO COMPANY'S LABOUR POLICY
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CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT


On the orders of the day:


LIB

Ernest Lapointe

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Quebec East):

Mr. Speaker, I am surprised to see in the votes and proceedings, at this late stage of the session, a notice for the introduction of a bill amending the criminal code. I do not know whether the measure is of an emergent character to cover a special situation, or whether the amendments proposed are extensive or important.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Minister of Justice) :

There are no radical provisions in the proposed change, with the exception of one concerning Doukhobor parades in western Canada. The other amendments are of a simple nature.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT
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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

The Ku Klux Klan should lend their nightshirts to the Doukhobors.

Topic:   CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT
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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE

INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO BRINGING DOWN OF FURTHER LEGISLATION


On the orders of the day.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

Before we proceed to further business may I ask my right hon. friend if this bill will be the last of the legislation to be brought down with the exception of that which is to deal with unemployment relief?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO BRINGING DOWN OF FURTHER LEGISLATION
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

No.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO BRINGING DOWN OF FURTHER LEGISLATION
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My right hon. friend says "No." I do think it is about time he had a little appreciation for the

Tl'aj/s and Means-Customs Tariff

position of hon. members in this house. Instead of acting as a Prime Minister he behaves as a dictator-and a disagreeable dictator, at that. All through this session he has been indifferent to the convenience of hon. members and has not seen fit even to bring down the proposed legislation in a manner which would enable it to be properly discussed. When, on repeated occasions, we have tried to accommodate him, all we have received by way of thanks has been a lecture or some rude remark.

I am speaking very plainly to my right hon. friend; he may continue to run the business of the house in the way he considers best, regardless of others, but it may be well for him to remember that there are two sides who have to do with and will have a say in the handling of it.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   INQUIRY WITH RESPECT TO BRINGING DOWN OF FURTHER LEGISLATION
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WAYS AND MEANS

CUSTOMS TARIFF RESOLUTIONS


The house in committee of ways and means, Mr. LaVergne in the chair.


CON

Armand Renaud La Vergne (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Conservative (1867-1942)

The CHAIRMAN:

When the committee

rose last night it was considering item No. 55 of the schedule. Shall the item carry?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF RESOLUTIONS
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CON

James J. Donnelly

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DONNELLY:

Mr. Chairman, when

we were speaking about corn last night I referred to the fact that the western grain growers would like to have cheaper freight rates for grain and fodder so that their coarse grains may be shipped at lower rates to the markets throughout Canada. I wish to substantiate what I said by reading an extract from a publication by the National Dairy Council of Canada following its meeting of March, 1931. On page 76 I find the following:

Cheaper feeds are.essential if there is to be an expanding production of dairy products. These are attainable through:-

(a) Cheaper distribution of grains and mill feeds. This involves lower freight rate to the extreme eastern and western parts of Canada in addition to bulk shipments and storage. The operations of the coarse grain pool promise to materially assist in this regard.

In other words the National Dairy Council is urging that there should be cheaper freight rates for coarse grain. I maintained last night and repeat to-day that the proposed duty on com will mean added expense to those people who are carrying on the dairy industry, trying to fatten cattle or to raise poultry. My suggestion to the Prime

Minister would be to leave the duty on corn as it is, namely, to leave it free for feeding purposes. As he has seen fit to allow a five cent freight rate on wheat I would suggest that he should make the same rate applicable to barley and coarse grains for domestic feeding purposes in order that the farmers in eastern Canada may be able to obtain barley at a cheaper rate. Either he should do that or cut the freight rates. It is absolutely essential however, if we are going to continue as a dairy producing and mixed farming country, that we should have our feeds distributed at cheaper rates throughout the Dominion. Either our farmers in western Canada must have assistance to bring their coarse grains at cheaper rates 'to eastern Canada and into British Columbia or assistance must be given either through cheaper freight rates or by the five cents which is being given to the wheat growers. In my opinion that should apply also to the barley growers so that their coarse grains may be delivered at cheaper rates. I should like to know whether or not the Prime Miinster will take into consideration the wishes of the National Dairy Council and the farmers throughout Canada.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF RESOLUTIONS
Permalink
CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Freight rates will not be dealt with by this legislation, because the government does not make them. They are made by the Board of Railway Commissioners. In my view the matters referred to by my hon. friend are not relevant on these tariff items. The remarks of my hon. friend with respect to freight rates have been repeated frequently, and sometimes I wonder whether hon. members realize the deficits with which the railways are faced at the present time and where those railway companies will find themselves if such deficits continue.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF RESOLUTIONS
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CON

James J. Donnelly

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DONNELLY:

What about five cents a bushel?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF RESOLUTIONS
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July 10, 1931