June 26, 1931


Mr. CAMERON R. McINTOSH (North Battleford): Mr. Speaker, I have a question to ask the head of the government based on the report of the Stamp grain commission. Will the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) inform the house if the government intends to print in full the evidence taken by the official stenographers at the different sittings of this commission, within and out of Canada?


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, the matter has not been

considered and I am unable to answer the question until inquiry is made.

Topic:   PRINTING OF EVIDENCE
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STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE

CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS (Minister of Trade and Commerce):

I think in justice to a

gentleman whose name was mentioned in the discussion last night, namely, Mr. Sanford Evans, I ought to convey to the house some

Privilege-Mr. Stewart (.Edmonton)

information which I have just this moment received. It is in connection with the famous or notorious appendix XII attached to the Stamp commission report. This is a telegram from Mr. Pitblado of Winnipeg stating as follows:

Appendix XII as published in the report of the Stamp commission was filed by me with the commission as counsel for the Winnipeg grain exchange.

It goes on to say that he had handed it personally to the chairman of the commission on April 22, after having received his permission, and he cites page 2210-H of the official transcript of the evidence for April 22. The telegram continues:

None of the commissioners had any previous knowledge of my intentions to file this document. The document which I handed to Sir Josiah Stamp was identical in every respect with the document which appears as appendix XII in the published report of the commission.

This will, I think, place clearly before the house two facts: first, that the graph or appendix which is objected to was filed by Mr. Pitblado, counsel for the Winnipeg grain exchange, and, second, that there was no alteration in the document after it was filed. That is, it appears in the report as filed by him. I think it is only fair to Mr. Sanford Evans to make this statement because it was stated by me last night that as far as I knew-and I was very careful to say that I had not precise information-it was prepared' and filed by Mr. Evans. But this makes it clear that it was filed by counsel for the Winnipeg grain exchange.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Hon. W. R. MOTHERWELL (Melville):

It was quite obvious to all of us on this side that Mr. Sanford Evans could not very well file a document before himself as he was a commissioner.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

Might I say

to the minister that what he has said does not in any way clear up what is causing the most concern at the moment, namely, how that document finally found its way into the copy of the report as printed and presented to parliament.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

We are making every

effort to find out all the mechanics of the thing, but I thought it was only fair to Mr. Sanford Evans to make this statement now. I may say to my right hon. friend that any statement which was made last night by me was made in the absence of any personal knowledge of the matter. I think I made that clear in the statement I made.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

We understood

that.

PRIVILEGE-MR. STEWART (Edmonton)

On the orders of the day:

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (West Edmonton):

Mr. Speaker, it is not very frequently that I have to object to newspaper articles, and I hope that on this occasion the hon. gentleman who is reported as having made a statement last night in the city of Hamilton has, as has been the complaint of many of his colleagues, been misreported. The matter is of rather serious consequence so far as I and some of my colleagues are concerned, and I ask the indulgence of the house to read a brief statement, as follows:

Hamilton, Ont., June 25.-Charges that four cabinet ministers in the recent Liberal government at Ottawa had promised to smash the glass industry in Hamilton were levelled by C. W. Bell, K.C., M.P. for Hamilton West, addressing the Conservative convention here to-night in the federal riding of Hamilton East at which M. M. Robinson, sportsman and newspaperman, was chosen Conservative candidate to contest the riding at the by-election, August 10.

Hon. Charles Stewart, Minister of the Interior, and Hon. James Malcolm, Minister of Trade and Commerce in the King government, and two other cabinet ministers had opposed the efforts of Hamilton to build up the glass industry there, said Mr. Bell.

Referring to his efforts to aid glass manufacturers in the city, Mr. Bell said: "This is the truth of the thing. In ten or twelve visits (to government officials at Ottawa) I did all I could. Yet every time I went to them I found that a new flood of propaganda undermining the confidence of their financial backers had been poured upon them.

This went on until one day at Ottawa I was told by Mr. Stewart, the Minister of the Interior in the King administration, and Mr. Malcolm, the Minister of Trade and Commerce, and two other cabinet ministers that they would never let Hamilton get its glass industry. And they said: 'We will smash your d- industry.' "

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

That means "damned."

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

The article

continues:

"That, ladies and gentlemen, is the truth."

This, he declared, had been the attitude of the Liberal members at Ottawa, which had blockaded attempts made by Hamilton men to secure protection for the city's industries.

May I say that when a member of the government I never was canvassed by the hon. member for West Hamilton (Mr. Bell) for aid for the glass industry. When the present government cancelled by an order in council the duty which was imposed at the September session, I met the hon. member in the Chateau Laurier and had a discussion with him, but that is the only conversation I have had with him with respect to this matter.

Suspension oj War Debts

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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CON

Felix Patrick Quinn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. QUINN:

Why does not the hon. member wait until the hon. member for West Hamilton is in his place?

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

This press despatch has been sent throughout Canada, and I am bound to say that I hope the hon. member did not make any such statement in Hamilton; I hope he was misreported.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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CON

Felix Patrick Quinn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. QUINN:

The hon. member should bring this matter up when the hon. member for West Hamilton is present.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

I certainly shall do that.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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LIB

James Malcolm

Liberal

Hon. JAMES MALCOLM (North Bruce):

Mr. Speaker, may I join with the hon. member for West Edmonton (Mr. Stewart) in saying that I do not wish to doubt the accuracy of the report, but as it is not based on any conversation that I can recall, I am inclined to think that the statement attributed to the hon. member for West Hamilton is not in accordance with the facts.

Topic:   STATEMENT BT HON. MR. STEVENS IN REGARD TO APPENDIX XII-TELEGRAM FROM COUNSEL FOR WINNIPEG GRAIN EXCHANGE
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SUSPENSION OF WAR DEBTS

STATEMENT OP PRIME MINISTER RESPECTIN Q PROPOSAL OP PRESIDENT HOOVER


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Min-lister):

Mr. Speaker, I indicated the other day that I would make a statement as soon as I was in position so to do with respect to the proposal made by President Hoover. In order that there may be no misapprehension as to the proposal as we understand it, I have committed my statement to writing.

Members of the house are familiar with President Hoover's striking proposal for the postponement during one year of all payments on intergovernmental debts, reparations and relief debts. The initiative which the United States has taken is a notable contribution to the restoration of sound economic conditions throughout the world. If carried out, the suspension of debt payments for the coming year will give a breathing space to heavily burdened countries, help to restore the confidence and hope essential to business revival, and set large sums free for economic reconstruction.

The suspension of German reparation payments would mean, so far as Canada is concerned, that our treasury will be deprived of something over $4,000,000 during the coming twelve months. In view of our own financial conditions, and in view of the fact that our expenditures on interest, on war debts, pensions, and other direct war legacies constitute some forty per cent of our whole expenditure, this is not a sum lightly to forego. The Canadian government believes, however, that the people of Canada would wish us to support the generous proposal of President Hoover, and to take our part in this endeavour to stabilize world conditions. We are prepared therefore to accept the proposal in principle, and to associate ourselves with His Majesty's government in the United Kingdom in the declaration that as soon as the proposal has been accepted by the chief creditor governments, we will be prepared to notify the Bank for International Settlements to suspend German reparation payments on Canadian accounts. We have advised His Majesty's government of Great Britain and the government of the United States accordingly.

It may be of interest to summarize the payments received by Canada on reparation account :

Reparation payments prior to Dawes plan.. ..

Reparation payments under Dawes plan:

1st year

2nd year

3rd year

4th year

5th year

Reparation payments under Young plan:

1st year

2nd year

3rd year to May 31

1930 mobilization, that is, share received from proceeds of German international loan 5J per cent payable June 1, 1965

Grand total of payments received

Perhaps some hon. members will be in- was suggested that this question might be terested in the total German payments. It asked and I have had the computation made

Tariff Board-Mr. Bennett

from the records as they are in the Department of Finance:

The total German payments to all countries from 1918 to 1931 amount to nearly

$5,000,000,000:

Prior to 1924- Gold Marks

Value of ceded properties.. 2,553,905,000 1920 to 31st August, 1924.. 6,267,751,505

Dawes plan, September 1,

1925, to August 31, 1929. 7,970,000,000

Young plan, to March 31,

1931 2,318,500,000

Total 19,110,156,505

Members will also have noted that His Majesty's government in the United Kingdom has very generously expressed its readiness to give to any of the dominions which owe war debts to Great Britain the option of postponing payment for a year if they so desire. To avoid misconception, I may remind the house that Canada is not included in this category, as all the war debts owed by Canada to Great Britain and by Great Britain to Canada were settled some years ago.

Topic:   SUSPENSION OF WAR DEBTS
Subtopic:   STATEMENT OP PRIME MINISTER RESPECTIN Q PROPOSAL OP PRESIDENT HOOVER
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June 26, 1931