May 29, 1931

LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

No, now.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

I do not know that I

am called upon at this particular instant to make a statement, unless I wish to.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

William Duff

Liberal

Mr. DUFF:

Oh, the minister does not

have to. I suggest, however, that he started this discussion in the answer he gave to the hon. member for Bellechasse. The minister went out of his way to say that as far as the returning officer was concerned there was no political appointment. Certainly as Minister of Justice he should be in a position to say what position the poll clerk occupies. Of course, he does not have to do it. Like a number of other ministers of the government his mouth has been closed all session. In fact I think the Minister of Justice is in agreement with the hon. member who has just spoken.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

No, I have not agreed.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

Did the hon. member say that the person who was dismissed was in the dairy branch?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

Joseph Oscar Lefebre Boulanger

Liberal

Mr. BOULANGER:

Yes, he was supervisor of dairy products.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

My information is

that he was in the live stock branch, not in the dairy branch.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

Ian Alistair Mackenzie

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE (Vancouver):

According to the hon. member for Marquette there is no difference.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

Peter John Veniot

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

Last night I spoke about

the butter question. I would not rise now to address the committee were it not for a statement made by the Minister of Agriculture about the policy of his department concerning the dairy industry in Canada. The minister has said that the policy of the government will be to endeavour to make production of the dairy industry as cheap as possible so that the producer may receive all possible benefit. I know I am not strictly in order when I touch upon the subject to which I am about to refer, but as the budget

will be brought down on Monday next I wish to draw the attention of the Minister of Agriculture to the tariff placed in September last on fertilizers. Under the present tariff, fertilizer ingredients brought into this country to be mixed for use as fertilizer are duty free, but if they are imported to be used separately in the dairy industry a duty of 2 or 2^ cents per pound is imposed. The dairy associations of the maritime provinces have petitioned the government to look further into this matter and to place those ingredients on the basis they occupied before the introduction of the tariff item in September, 1930. I have before me a letter from the president of the Nova Scotia Dairymen's Association. That association passed ' a resolution last January protesting against the increased duty, and arising out of that resolution I received this letter, the latter part of which I shall read:

The tendency of the tariff will be to kill cooperation in buying by giving the commercial company the advantage of us. You cannot call them a manufacturing company, because they do not manufacture, they only blend. By cooperation for ten years we vrere able last year to purchase two tons of fertilizer for less money than one ton cost us ten years ago.

The letter goes on to say that if this duty obtains, certain companies will be established in Canada whose only object will be to import the ingredients separately and blend them in Canada. In the province of New Brunswick the farmers' cooperative associations, especially in the counties along the river St. John, have been in the habit of importing these ingredients and blending them to suit themselves. To-day, because of the increased tariff, there is a company established in St. John in the blending business. The establishment of this company will interfere with the cooperative activities of the dairy farmers in New Brunswick as well as with the operations of the potato growers. The dairymen import acid phosphate separate from all other ingredients. Acid phosphate is used as a top dressing after the seed has been sown and the plant has grown about five or six inches. When acid phosphate is imported separately a duty of 2 or 2| cents per pound is imposed. Because of that duty the cost of production is increased to the dairy industry, and I now ask the minister to look into the matter. Fertilizer comes under the control of his department and if there is some way of amending the tariff item so that the farmers who import acid phosphate separate from other ingredients will not have to pay the duty of 2 or 21 cents per pound their difficulties will be greatly relieved.

Supply-Agriculture-Dairying

Before taking my seat I should like to put a couple of questions to the minister. I do not expect answers to-night, but I would ask him to prepare the information to be supplied after the budget is brought down on Monday. How many fertilizer ingredients are manufactured in Canada, and what quantities of ingredients for mixing purposes as fertilizers are imported? My second question is: How many mixing plants are there in Canada?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

Could the hon. member let me have those questions?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

Peter John Veniot

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

Yes, I shall.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

James J. Donnelly

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DONNELLY:

I wish to thank the

Minister of Agriculture for having answered the questions I asked him before six o'clock. I wish further to thank him for having enunciated his policy in regard to the dairy producer, and especially for his remarks regarding the reduction of the costs of production. I wonder, however, how he intends to reduce the cost of production when he knows that in many parts of western Canada where mixed farming is practised the farms require fencing. I understand the government of which he is a member has placed a dumping duty on barbed wire so that we are paying a higher price for it than we did before. In western Canada the fencing problem is vital because in many parts of the west there is no lumber and the farmers find it necessary to buy barbed wire. When the price of barbed wire is raised the costs of dairy farming are raised. Since the government wishes to reduce the cost of production to western farmers I think they should not have been instrumental iD raising the price of fencing.

Speaking this afternoon the former Minister of Agriculture referred to a report of the National Dairy Council. He referred especially to this part where Mr. Robinson said:

It was my privilege to join with Dean Barton of Macdonald college and Doctor Archibald of the Dominion experimental farms in the preparation of this report to the Minister of Agriculture.

Will the minister kindly tell the committee what this ctommititee is doing. Is it dtill functioning?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

I asked the committee to prepare a skeleton report that I might present it to a larger committee for a free discussion in connection with the whole matteT.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
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CON

James J. Donnelly

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DONNELLY:

It has not reported yet?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

No.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

Charles Edward Bothwell

Liberal

Mr. BOTHWELL:

We have had considerable discussion over the National Dairy

Council grant which is included an this vote of $295,000. Last session a similar vote was passed without any information as to what other items were included in it. It is said that last year's vote included new buildings. What new buildings were built last year, and what does the vote cover this year?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

No buildings were

erected last year.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

Charles Edward Bothwell

Liberal

Mr. BOTHWELL:

What is included in

the vote of 8295,000 in addition to the $5,000 we have heard so much about?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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CON

Robert Weir (Minister of Agriculture)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. WEIR (Melfort):

This is an estimate only. ;It is impossible to give details of the expenditure until the end of the year. Some of the expenses are as follows:

1. Headquarters-$17,800.

This includes printing and stationery and supplies for offices outside Ottawa. Contingencies of various kinds and the $5,000 grant to the dairy council.

2. Grading of Dairy Produce-$162,300.

This includes salaries and travelling expenses of dairy produce graders at Charlottetown, Halifax, Quebec, Montreal, Belleville, Toronto, Stratford. Ottawa, Winnipeg, Saskatoon, Regina, Edmonton, Calgary, Vancouver.

In addition to these technical men there are a number of labourers employed and a clerical staff as well as some expenses in connection with the laboratory work needed to be done to help in the grading.

3. Cargo Inspection-$28,842.

This sum includes salaries and travelling expenses of 8 cargo inspectors, Montreal, and 5 in the United Kingdom, also cost and upkeep of thermographs and some incidental expenses. The work of these cargo inspectors is to see to it that proper care is taken in shipping our dairy produce under good conditions on steamers and to check up on the steamship companies both at shipping points and landing points.

4. Investigator-Weighing.

Butter and cheese-$2,800.

Salary and expenses.

5. Supervision of Condenseries-$3,860.

6. Dairy Market Reports-$4,785.

One inspector and expenses.

7. Refrigerator.

DeffiHm^cars-$20,000.

Refrigerator ear services for butter and cheese are operated by Canadian National Railways and Caandian Pacific Railway companies in Ontario and eastern provinces on condition that the department make up any deficits due to lack of sufficient business.

These deficits for this year are estimated at: Butter-$11,500.

Cheese-$8,500.

8. Creamery Cold Storage Bonus-$4,500.

On condition that cold storage facilities acceptable to the department are provided in connection with creameries a grant of $100 is given to any creamery.

9. Plans-$200.

Supply-Agriculture-Dairying

10. Dairy Research-$4,500.

This includes, laboratory supplies, raw material (butter, cheese, milk) and contingencies in connection with this work. Two technical men are employed.

11. Administration of Dairy Laws-$39,000.

This includes salaries of 10 inspectors and

their travelling expenses as well as analysts' fees and counsel fees when prosecutions are necessary.

12. Milk Utilization Service-$6,200.

This amount includes costs of exhibits, express and freight charges to exhibitions, and costs in connection with special exhibits loaned to public health, nurses' and women's institutes.

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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LIB

Charles Edward Bothwell

Liberal

Mr. BOTHWELL:

Is the 8100 granted to creameries to establish refrigeration facilities a continuation of an old policy or is it an innovation?

Topic:   REPRESENTATION ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   REPRESENTATION FOR ELECTORS RESIDENT IN THE DISTRICT OP PATRICIA
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May 29, 1931