May 28, 1931

CON

John Thomas Hackett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HACKETT:

I would point out to the committee that there was every reason for our production of butter to increase during that period because in those years, by reason of legislation hostile to the export of milk and cream-this is particularly true of the eastern townships, and truer still of the border counties of the eastern townships from which such large quantities of milk and cream were exported to the large centres of New England- exports were greatly curtailed.

I will now give the quantities of milk and cream which in eveT-diminishing volume were exported during the five-year period under review.

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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Before my hon. friend

comes to that, does he contend that the importation of butter has anything to do with the price of butter in this country? If so, how is it that if we are importing less butter now, the price is much lower than it was before?

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CON
LIB
CON

John Thomas Hackett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HACKETT:

If my hon. friend will bear with me for a feiw moments, I will deal with prices. I am now dealing with quantities. In 1925 we exported from Canada-and I can assure my hon. friend from Temiseouata that most of this export came from the province of Quebec-4,314,193 gallons of milk, of a value of $784,081. The figures are as follows:

Exports of milk in

Year gallons Value1925

4,314,193 $784,0811926

4,801,705 971,0161927

3,673,242 729,8231928

3,959.812 866,9201929

3,291,819 750,2571930

1,475,618 309,011

Our exports of cream were as follows:

Exports of cream in

Year gallons Value1925

4,077,487 $7,000,1411926

4,457,129 7,601,4321927

4,044,916 7,120,2091928

3,043,418 5,593,3991929

2,385,754 4,911,5351930

1,269,721 2,468,216

To summarize, during this period our exports of butter were reduced from over

Supply-Agriculture-Dairying

26.500.000 to 1,000,000 pounds, and our imports increased from 99,000 to 47,000,000. Our milk subsided in export from 4,314,000 to 1,475,000 gallons, and our cream subsided in export from

4.077.000 to 1,269,000 gallons. That has to do with the quantity. I submit for the moment that when this treaty became effective and butter was brought in from Australia and New Zealand, we ceased to be an exporting country and we ceased to enjoy our own markets-and *this in spite of the fact that we had been denied another market to which we were sending the very commodity from which butter is made.

As pointed out by my hon. friend -from Temiscouata, there is another aspect to the question, and that is price. The price of butter has subsided. Butter has gone down in price until it is now about 21^ cents per pound. All along the border for years butter in the United States, and particularly in the New England states, has sold at a retail price of from ten to twelve cents higher than the price in Canada. That fact is known to everybody in the dairy business in the eastern townships.

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LIB
CON

John Thomas Hackett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HACKETT:

When I went to school the state of Washington was remote from the states of Vermont, New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

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?

An hon. MEMBER:

Why not quote world's prices?

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CON

John Thomas Hackett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HACKETT:

Between New England and Montreal there was invariably a difference in price of from ten to twelve cents a pound. To-day butter in these New England centres is selling within the range of one cent of the price at which our own butter is selling in Montreal.

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CON

Charles-Philippe Beaubien

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BEAUBIEN:

Would the hon. member tell the committee where he got his figures?

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CON

John Thomas Hackett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HACKETT:

Yes; I can tell the department and the person who supplied the information.

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CON
CON
LIB

James Lorimer Ilsley

Liberal

Mr. ILSLEY:

Was there not a period of four or five months in the early part of 1930 when the price was higher in Canada than it was in the United States, and if so how does that affect the argument of my hon. friend?

Mr. HACKETT': In 1930 the price of

butter in the New England states certainly was higher than the price in Canada.

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LIB
?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

No.

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CON

John Thomas Hackett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. HACKETT:

Within the past two

decades there never was a time, until very recently, when the price of butter was lower in New England than in Canada.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

I am afraid my hon. friend will have to revise his information, because butter came to Montreal in the early part of 1930.

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LIB
?

An hon. MEMBER:

That is not a question.

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May 28, 1931