April 24, 1931

AUDITOR GENERAL'S REPORT

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

Mr. Speaker now that the standing

committees have been set up it becomes possible for me to move seconded by Mr. Guthrie:

That the Auditor General's report for the .Tear ending March 31, 1930, and the public accounts for the year ending March 31, 1930, be referred to the select standing committee on public accounts.

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Motion agreed to.


LIBRARY OF PARLIAMENT

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved:

that a message be sent to the Senate to acquaint their honours that this house has appointed His Honour the Speaker and Messrs. Barber, Bertrand, Bourassa, Boyes, Butcher, Carmichael, Charters, Chevrier, Cotnam, Dubois, Factor, Ferland, Fontaine, Fortin, Fraser (Cariboo), Gagnon, Girouard, Guthrie, Hepburn, Jr vine, Jones, Lafleche, Larue, LaVergne, Mar-oil, McGillis, McGregor, McIntosh, MacMillan (Saskatoon), Peck. Perley (Sir George), Pouliot, Quinn, Rheaume, Short, Rinfret, Smoke, Stirling, Thauvette, Thompson (Simcoe East)! 1 hompson (Lanark), White (London), Wright, a committee to assist His Honour the Speaker m the direction of the library of parliament, so far as the interests of the House of Commons are concerned, and to .act on behalf of the House of Commons as members of a joint committee of both houses of parliament on the library.

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Motion agreed to.


PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved:

That a message be sent to the Senate to acquaint their honours that this house will unite with them in the formation of a joint committee of both houses on the subject of the printing oi parliament, and that the members ot the select standing committee on printing namely, Messrs. Anderson (Halton), Baribeam Belec Boulanger, Brasset, Buckley, Campbell, Charters, Desrochers, Dubois, Edwards, Embury, Esling Factor, Fortin, Girouard, Gott, Gray, Hay, Heaps, Howden, Lucas, MacLean (Prince) Maloney Marcil, Matthews, McKenzie (Assini-bma l Moore (Chateauguay-Huntingdon), Munn Murphy Peck, Perley (Qu'Appelle), Perras, lickel Porteous, Price. Quinn, Rheaume. Rin-Iret, Roberge, Rowe, Ryerson, St-Pere, Short,

Simpson (Simcoe North), Spankie, Spencer, Spotton, Stewart (Lethbridge), Taylor, Te-trault, X erville, Wilson, Wright, will act as members on the part of this house, on the said joint committee on the printing of parliament.

Topic:   PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT
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Motion agreed to.


PARLIAMENTARY RESTAURANT

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) moved:

That a message be sent to the Senate to acquaint their honours that this house has appointed the Honourable the Speaker and Messrs. Ahearn, Barrette, Black (Halifax), Bourassa, Carmichael, Cayley, Garland (Carle-ton) Hanbury, Howard, Howden, Lafleche, Maephail (Miss), Neill, Ryerson, Senn, Spankie,

* pence, Sproule, Wilson, a committee to assist His Honour the Speaker in the direction of the restaurant so far as the interests of the Commons are concerned, and to act as members of a joint committee of both houses on the restaurant. .

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Motion agreed to.


CANADIAN HIGH COMMISSIONER

REPORT OF SPEECH DELIVERED TO ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Leader of the Opposition):

I wish to ask

the Prime Minister, Mr. Speaker, whether the government has taken, steps to ascertain the accuracy of a report which appears in the papers of to-day of a speech made, or purported to have been made, in England last night by the Honourable High Commissioner of Canada in London, and whether the speech has had the authority and approval of the Prime Minister or of any member of the administration. The despatch to which I refer appears, among other papers, in the Montreal Gazette of to-day, and the Gazette's report is as follows:

Ferguson Warns British Leaders

Dominions Will Outstrip Mother Country If Cooperation Lacking, He Says

(Canadian Press Cable)

London, April 23.-"Unless you are very careful how you treat us it will be only another generation before we take your place as leaders in industry and as economic leaders of the world." With these words, Hon. G. Howard Ferguson, Canadian High Commissioner to London, concluded an appeal to Great Britain to "take the dominions by the bands and negotiate with them." Mr. APRIL 24, 1931

Privilege-Mr. Stitt (Nelson)

Ferguson was speaking at the annual dinner of the Association of the British Chambers of Commerce here to-night.

He sometimes thought he declared, that owing to Great Britain's tremendous success through the centuries, when the world came to her as its financial centre and commercial leader, Britain had built up through the generations a feeling that she was more or less self-sufficient. It had not been realized that with the coming of war and destruction of the world's economic fabric, other nations had been rapidly growing in power and become powerful competitors of Britain.

"Where are you going to look for support if you do not turn to members of your own family?" he asked. "They are pressing to be permitted to sit down at the family table and work out problems on which your prosperity and happiness depend. Unless you are very careful how you treat us it will be only another generation before we take your place as leaders in industry and economic leaders of the world."

"Canada has the territory; the natural wealth and the right spirit, but we want from Great Britain to-day more capital and a helping hand. The time of depression will shorten if you will take the dominions by the hand and negotiate with them. The people of Britain and Canada want to come closer together and no government will stop them," Mr. Ferguson said.

Topic:   CANADIAN HIGH COMMISSIONER
Subtopic:   REPORT OF SPEECH DELIVERED TO ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Prime Minister; Minister of Finance and Receiver General; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Right Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Prime Minister) :

Mr. Speaker, I read the report in the

press to which the right hon. gentleman has referred and which he has read to the house.

I have not thought it necessary to ask for a verification, nor for a copy of the speech delivered. There was no antecedent discussion of the speech, nor was the ministry advised of the purport of the remarks that were to be made by the High Commissioner. In due course the government will be advised, and if it is desirable that the house should be informed, it will be informed.

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Subtopic:   REPORT OF SPEECH DELIVERED TO ASSOCIATION OF BRITISH CHAMBERS OF COMMERCE
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PRIVILEGE- MR. B. M. STITT


On the orders of the day:


CON

Bernard Munroe Stitt

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. B. M. STITT (Nelson):

On a question of privilege, Mr. Speaker, I rise to resent, as I think every member of this house and western members in particular should resent, an imputation contained in the leading editorial of this morning's Ottawa Journal. I will read that editorial, which is as follows:

Canadians presently engaged with pencil and paper figuring out how much they owe the treasury for income tax, and wondering what governments do with all the money, might profitably study a return tabled in parliament on Wednesday. It had to do with the Hudson Bay railway. With its cost.

The Hudson Bay railway, as everybody knows, is not yet finished. Thus far, however, its financial story is this:

Cost of the l'oad up to February

28, 1931 $30,997,136 44Cost of Port Nelson terminals. 6,240,200 86Cost of Churchill terminals.. 7,256,846 51Cost of Hudson strait expedition 1,323,809 51

Cost of radio direction finding

work 349,678 23

Total cost to date.. .. $46,167,671 55

Forty-six millions gone-and the end not yet! Even this year, when economy is vital, and when the government is harrassed to make ends meet, there is $6,000,000 more in the estimates for this craziness.

We have two costly transcontinental railways hauling grain east and west. We have spent hundreds of millions on canals and harbours. We have spent lavishly to ship wheat through St. John and Halifax, through Montreal and Quebec, through Vancouver and Prince Rupert. We talk of the St. Lawrence deep waterway. Yet, while spending and

building and talking that way, we have gone on putting $46,000,000 in a road whose steel ends with ice-floes and amid wolves and seals.

It is an extraordinary study in folly.

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April 24, 1931