April 16, 1931

LIB

Charles Edward Bothwell

Liberal

Mr. BOTHWELL:

I quote:

Mr. Bennett, departing for Britain, expressed confidence in his mission, and up to the very end, when the failure of the conference became clear to all, faith existed that somehow he would induce the British government to purchase the bulk of the dominion's wheat surplus.

Mr. Bennett within the restricted ground of his "Canada first" policy, undoubtedly did his best. His offer to the British people of a preference in Canadian markets, based upon a 10 per cent increase in the duties upon all foreign products, was sincere. The weakness of the plan, so far as the British people were concerned, was that while it involved a guarantee that the British would buy Canada's wheat, there was no corresponding guarantee that the Canadian people would buy British goods. On the contrary, the actual position was that, taking account of the tariff increases imposed by the special session of the Canadian parliament, the barriers against British goods were higher than before.

In the circumstances. Canadian opinion did not greatly blame Britain for rejecting the Bennett plan.

Then,, further down in the same article I find the following:

So Mr. Bennett has returned to a Canada which has still some 250,000,000 bushels of unsold wheat, which has an acute unemployment problem, and whose declining revenues threaten an enormous deficit at the close of the fiscal year. The weakness of his position is that, like Mr. Hoover in the United States, he took office on a platform of prosperity. Mr. Bennett, electionteering told the Canadian people that failure to market the western wheat crop and prevalence of unemployment were the fruits of the Liberal ministry of Mr. King. After four months in office, and despite millions voted for unemployment relief, unemployment is still acute, and the wheat of the west remains unsold.

Even after that conference we of the west still hoped that something would be done. Towards the close of the year the newspapers throughout Canada, and particularly those of the west, heralded the visit of the Prime Minister to Regina. Through the press we were told that he was going to bring some sort of policy to the people of the west which would give us help. Everybody looked forward with hopefulness to that meeting on December 30 in the city of Regina. I believe interest was as great in all parts of the west concerning the visit of the Prime Minister as it was in my particular district. People who were not able to go to Regina to hear the speech drove miles where necessary, to hear it over the radio. We expected that we were going to hear something. I had the opportunity of listening to that address, and while it did not convey very much to me because there was nothing very definite as to the policy or plan which would be followed, nevertheless I still had hopes that the Prime Minister had something in mind which he was not in a position fully to divulge at the moment.

On January 2, I received a letter from one of my constituents, a great admirer of the right hon. Prime Minister, in which he addresses me as follows:

The Address-Mr. Bothwell

Beaver Flats, December 31, 1930. Mr. C. E. Bothwell, K.C.,

Federal Member for Swift Current.

Dear Sir:

We listened with interest to Mr. R. B. Bennett last night at Regina, and we want to be among the first to take advantage of his scheme to get into diversified farming. As you will no doubt have the particulars please let us have application forms and particulars.

Also could you tell us about the federal farm loan board or what you call it.

How about a job taking 1931 census?

This ought to be a happy New Year. Let us hope so.

I replied to that letter telling him that I did not know what this proposal was that Mr. Bennett had made in Regina on December 30, any more than he did. The only information I had was what I was able to gather over the radio, but I gave him an answer in connection with the farm loan board and told him at the same time that I was writing the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Weir) to find out what this scheme was. I directed the following letter to Hon. Mr. Weir-

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CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan (Secretary of State of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CAHAN:

Mr. Speaker, I think we

might conform to parliamentary practice. It is against the rules of the house to refer to any member of the house by name; he should be referred to by his constituency.

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LIB

Charles Edward Bothwell

Liberal

Mr. BOTHWELL:

I am sorry, Mr. Speaker; I should have referred to the hon. gentleman as the Minister of Agriculture. However, the letter refers to Hon. Mr. Weir. It is addressed as follows:

Swift Current, Sask.,

January 2nd, 1931.

The Hon. Robert Weir,

Minister of Agriculture,

Ottawa, Canada.

Dear Sir:

_ The Right Hon. R. B. Bennett, in bis address in Regina on the 30th ultimo intimated that a scheme had been worked out for enabling farmers of the west to get into diversified farming through governmental assistance.

That was the way I understood the Prime Minister's address.

I have a letter from one of my constituents to-day, Walter Smith of Beaver Flats, Saskatchewan, stating that he listened to Mr. Bennetf's address over the radio and he wants to be among the first to take advantage of the scheme. In his letter he mentions that I will, no doubt, have the particulars and he wished me to advise him just what the scheme is, and forward to him the necessary application forms.

I would be glad to have any information you can give me in this connection so that I can advise Mr. Smith.

That letter was written on January 2. On January 14, a letter was written to me by the Minister of Agriculture as follows:

[Mr Bothwell.]

Assistance to farmers in the nature of seed grain, etc.. I understand, will be made through the machinery of the provincial government as they are closer to the problem and will save the Dominion government a good deal of expense in duplicating machinery.

I hope hon. members listened to the reading of my letter and the reading of the letter in reply from the Minister of Agriculture. There is not a single word in that reply with reference to the questions which I asked. However, the minister stated that he understood that assistance in the nature of seed grain would be made through the machinery of the provincial governments. I wanted to know then what the provincial government knew about this plan which had been announced by the Prime Minister, so I wrote to Regina. The provincial legislature was then in session and a question was put on the orders of the day in order to find out what they knew about the situation. This was the question:

Have arrangements been made by the federal government with the provincial government in connection with implementing the promise made by the Hon. R. B. Bennett, in bis address at Regina on December 30, 1930, of assistance to farmer's in securing seed grain, etc.?

The answer was:

Discussions have taken place between members of the Dominion government and the provincial government regarding seed grain, and information is being asked for rural municipalities in order that appropriate action may be taken.

So still I had no information. To-day, Mr. Speaker, a question was asked of the Prime Minister as to how this finance company, or whatever it is to be called, was getting along, but apparently as yet it is not functioning, and we do not know whether or not it ever will function. In any event, if I understood correctly the answer given on the floor of the house to-day, there has been no relief of any kind given to any farmer at any place in Canada under the scheme announced by the Prime Minister last December. As a matter of fact, I believe that speech was made by the right hon. gentleman following a speech made by Mr. Beatty in London, Ontario, on December 5, when Mr. Beatty said:

To me, an unprejudiced and unofficial but not disinterested observer, it seems indisputable the Dominion government should not hesitate to intervene with an offer of assistance as a national public duty. In recent years assistance, as I have indicated, lias been given in one way or another for the removal of disabilities of manufacturing interests, of the dairy and fruit farmers of the east and British Columbia, and of the maritime provinces. More recently direct financial aid has been provided for unemployed workers. Special pro-

The Address-Mr. Bothwell

vision for the farmers of the west, suffering from difficulties which they could not foresee nor avoid, should be regarded by other groups in the country as a simple act of justice.

Yet, Mr. Speaker, although we had the definite promise that the Conservatives would sell our Canadian wheat, they went to the conference and fell down. We had the announcement in Regina on December 30 of last year that some assistance would be given to the west right away, but outside of some seed grain and possibly some gasoline provided through the municipalities there has been no relief of any kind, so far as I know, given to the west other than what assistance they received under that $20,000,000 unemployment relief bill. In that connection, I do not know but what the position to-day is worse than it was before the 820,000,000 was voted. It seems to me it is going to be impossible for the municipalities of the west to carry through such unemployment schemes again. Any person who observed the public works that were being carried on last winter under the scheme must have come to the conclusion that the municipalities could have done the work just as efficiently and as well for the amount of money they themselves were spending, without the assistance which was granted by the provincial or federal governments. That added assistance was simply being used by the workmen in order, shall I say, to lie down on the job. The work did not progress as it should. I believe it would have been cheaper for Canada if the unemployed had been put on direct relief instead of working under that Unemployment Relief Act.

I did not and do not now object to the appropriation of $20,000,000; I believe it to be the duty of this government to take steps to remedy the unemployment situation in Canada. If this cannot be done by governmental policies, then it will be necessary to do it by appropriations, because we cannot allow people in Canada to starve when we have all kinds of food in the country. However, realizing the difficulty with which the west is faced; with the western premiers coming down to Ottawa; with farmer organizations from one end of the country to the. other sending in resolutions and with deputations of farmers coming to Ottawa pleading with the government to fix the price of wheat, why was not something done? They did not hesitate in 1.917 and 1918 to peg wheat prices. They did not hesitate then when it was in the interests possibly of other people to handle our wheat. We do not know yet whether the allies got the benefit of the reduced price or whether the government got it. None of the questions asked on

the orders of the day have been answered. Ever since I have been in the house my experience has been that most of the questions asked on the orders of the day, in the course of routine proceedings, would have been answered. To-day, if you ask a minister the amplest kind of question he says, "Put it on the order paper"; and we'have not been able to receive answers to important questions asked in this house, any more than I was able to get answer to the questions which I submitted on January 2. It is time that hon. members in this house brought forcibly to the attention of the government the situation which Canada is in at the present time, and demanded some action. We believe it is the duty of this government to fix the price of wheat if they cannot do anything else. Are they not in a position to enable us to sell our wheat at fair prices after we have contributed to the manufacturers from one end of the country to the other since the inception of these tariff regulations? Surely they cannot expect us after that to go down tc defeat in the west and abandon that country just because, in a year or two of stress, the government will not come to our assistance and fix a price.

Last winter, organizations of various kinds throughout western Canada held meetings at different points, and I myself have a record of forty-three different meetings held in the constituency of Swift Current. Resolutions were passed at these meetings. I did not attend any of them with the exception of a board of trade meeting at Swift Current; but as I say, at all these meetings resolutions were adopted and forwarded to the government. I received copies of them-resolutions from boards of trade, village and rural councils, farmers' organizations and so on. Let me quote one resolution which was adopted at Pennant, Saskatchewan, on December 17, 1930, requesting that certain things be done:

1. That the federal government guarantee a minimum fixed price of wheat for this year's crop at one dollar ($1) per bushel f.o.b. Fort William.

2. That a board of standards be set up whose duty it will be to arrive at a proper relationship between the price which the farmer has to pay for the commodities which he purchases and the price which he receives for the commodities which he has to sell.

3. That we urge the nationalization of currency and credit.

4. That we demand a moratorium until such time as proper adjustments have been made.

5. That the legal rate of interest at 7 per cent as set out in the Bank Act be enforced, and that no one shall be allowed to charge higher than the legal rate of interest.

The Address-Mr. Bothwell

6. That the federal government, in conjunction with the provincial governments, institute a form of crop insurance.

7. That we ask for the nationalization of the Canadian Pacific Railway Company and the re-valuation of the Canadian National.

8. That we continue our efforts to secure for the growers 100 per cent control of the marketing of their products; first, by demanding that a grain marketing act, as suggested by the wheat pool, be placed on the statutes; secondly, that a primary products act be placed on the

. statutes.

This is the type of resolution which was passed at each of these forty-three meetings. The resolutions vary in some respects, but so far as I know there has never been received, from any member of the government, an answer to a single one of these resolutions forwarded here since December last. I cannot tell to whom the various resolutions were sent, but I have copies of them. They were directed to the attention of the government but there have been no replies.

Now, we are immersed in spring work at this season of the year and the farmers have been looking for some information from the government. They wish to know what they are to do. They do not know whether or not to seed a crop. The weather conditions are not propitious, and in any event they are taking a chance in sowing a crop. Surely, then, they are entitled to some encouragement from the government of the day in order that they may react favourably, so to speak, to the weather conditions as they are. But they can gelt no information. I repeat, Mr. Speaker, that a number of these questions that are asked on the orders of the day should be answered without our having to wait for replies through the ordinary publications of the house. These questions should be answered on the floor of the house; they are questions that concern the farmers throughout the west. Hon. members desire to send information to their constituents but they cannot do so, and it matters not whether you go to the department or ask questions on the floor of the house, you do not seem to be able to obtain any information.

I have here a letter written on April 2, and in this connection I wish the hon. member for Marquette (Mr. Mullins) were in his place to hear it. I should not like hon. members of this house to believe that the conditions throughout the west are as the hon. member for Marquette would have us understand. The letter in question is dated, at Swift Current, Saskatchewan, April 2, 1931, and is addressed thus:

Hon. R. J. Manion,

Minister of Railways, Ottawa.

Hon. J. A. Merkley,

Minister of Railways, Regina.

C. E. Bothwell, K.C.. M.P., Ottawa.

Hon. W. W. Smith, M.L.A., City.

Re-South Saskatchewan Railway and Traffic

Bridge and Southwestern Saskatchewan Development

Honourable Gentlemen:

Adverting to our previous resolutions a memorandum of which is enclosed; and as the estimates will soon be up for consideration at Ottawa and in view of the continuation of present depressed condition of agriculture, labour and business, it is imperative that some projects be undertaken in this city and district to relieve the unemployment situation, augment the circulation of money, bring about needed facilities and maintain a spirit of confidence and encouragement of our people to say nothing of absolute want and poverty of a very great section of our people. Our board most urgently request that further relief of some kind be found as other relief measures are now exhausted being only temporary relief and that now larger projects must be undertaken to enable people to earn a livelihood and at the same time afford the district and city service facilities that will be of use for all time.

The letter goes on to refer to railway construction works that should be proceeded with, such as are indicated in the resolutions that were sent down and in the corresipondence alluded to in the letter. I wish to bring this matter to the attention of the government in order that they may realize, if they have not already done so, that the situation in the west is indeed serious and that it is time something was done to encourage the people in that part of the country, especially at this time of the year when they feel that, if they are to have anything to live on this winter, they must put in a crop. They are entitled to the information they require if they are to realize out of their crop enough to pay expenses.

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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. C. B. HOWARD (Sherbrooke):

In discussing the speech from the throne and the amendment thereto proposed by the leader of the opposition (Mr. Mackenzie King) I am not unmindful that Canada is going through one of the severest world-wide economic depressions she has ever known- this in spite of the fact that during the last election campaign Conservative candidates in the eastern townships of Quebec claimed that this depression was due entirely to the administration of the late government. I do not wish for one moment, Mr. Speaker, that you should consider me a pessimist. I am not in the least a pessimist. I know that of all countries in the world Canada, with all its troubles, is possibly best off at the present

The Address-Mr. Howard

time. With our undeveloped natural resources; with our hard-working, thrifty, kind-hearted population; with our increasing gold production and our enormous mining possibilities, to say nothing of our agricultural areas, which are second to none, we shall emerge from this crisis as we have emerged from similar situations in the past; and I am perfectly satisfied that when we get out of this depression conditions in Canada will be better than they have ever been before.

As to my own section of the country, I believe, notwithstanding the general depression that exists there also, and especially in Sherbrooke, that we are possibly better off than any place else in Canada. In my remarks, therefore, what I wish to prove is that the promises made during the last election campaign by the Conservative party have not been kept, and that the way in which the present government is handling the affairs of the country is retarding the comeback into our regular stride. The right hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Mackenzie King), the hon. member for Quebec East (Mr. Lapointe) and other hon. members of this house have shown where these policies might carry us in our empire relations, but I want to show this house how the policies of the present government have affected my own constituency in southern Quebec.

I am not a protectionist Liberal, as most people say I am, nor am I a free trade Liberal, as others think I am, but I believe that free trade is just as bad for Canada as is the present high protection. The only policy which will benefit this country in the long run, or even at the present time, is one which is between the two extremes, one on a par with the old Liberal policy.

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CON

Maurice Dupré (Solicitor General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DUPRE:

That is what we are doing.

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An hon. MEMBER:

Oh, no.

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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

I think credit is due to

the Prime Minister (Mr. Bennett) for his sincerity, because I believe he is sincere in his ideas of what is best for Canada. But I do think, and I shall attempt to prove my argument in the short time at my disposal, that his policies are detrimental both to my own section and to Canada as a whole. The present government is in power for two reasons: First, because of the extraordinary unemployment situation which existed, and second, the falling prices of farm products, which prevailed at the time of the elections. I will not quote the many promises made by the Prime Minister, but I do want to refer to some remarks he made at a meeting held in my home town. The following is a quotation

from the paper which supported the present government during the last elections^ the Sherbrooke Daily Record, and I would particularly call the attention of the house to it:

What is the use of advertising in the town paper that John Smith is sick, without sending ior the doctor? Send for the doctor. He is the Conservative party.

The following is a remark made by the Prime Minister at that same meeting:

Canadians want the right to work and when a government fails to correct the causes of unemployment over which it has control that government can justly be charged with negligence.

The other Sherbrooke paper, La Tribune, which supported the Liberal party, in reporting that same meeting said:

Vte wish to call a special session to put an end to these conditions, because the people want work and not doles.

Bennett: Exactly. What you want is

work and not a conference. I am not making you pledges, lightly. Should I not keep them, J ask the members who you elect to withdraw irom me their support.

This meeting was reported- to have been attended by about 12,000 people. It was held in the 54th armouries, which is situated in the centre of the industrial section of Sherbrooke. The Prime Minister then became more brave, walked to the front of the platform, pointed in the direction of one of the industries, and said: "I know I am speaking within a stone's throw of some of the finest industries in Canada; I know that those industries are on short time, and if I am elected on July 28, within thirty days the men, women and children will be going back to those industries and getting the work they should get." Mr. Speaker, two hundred and sixty-two days have expired instead of thirty and the situation is worse than it has ever been.

In the city of Sherbrooke there are 42 industries. Without taking particular examples, I desire to give the house certain information in connection with twelve of the main industries in the city of Sherbrooke.

In 1930, one of our specialty steel companies employed 125 hands, and on February 15, 1931, their employment had dropped to 100 hands.

Our largest steel manufacturing industry employed 488 hands in July of 1930; in February of this year, their payroll had dropped to 400.

One of our cotton industries employed 363 hands in July, 1930, while to-day they are employing only 323.

Another specialty steel industry employed 150 as against 125 to-day.

The Address-Mr. Howard

Another company's payroll dropped from 70 to 58.

Another large steel company was employing 119 hands only fifteen days before the last election, and on February 15 last, they were employing only 27; from 119 to 27.

A rubber company dropped from 80 to 65 and another machinery company from 30 to 10.

A silk company employing 490 in July of last year was employing that number in February of this year but it was working on shorter hours. The same would apply to other companies.

From the date of the elections to the present day there has been a decrease in employment affecting 321 hands. Most important of all, these same industries have dropped from 149,174 weekly hours to 106,904, or a slackening off of 42,270 hours per week. Figured at the ordinary price paid for labour, that represents a shrinkage in the payroll of 12 out of a total of 42 industries, amounting to over $12,000 per week. In other words, over $12,000 per week less money is being paid out to-day in the city of Sherbrooke than was being paid when the promises were made by the present Prime Minister that the unemployment situation would be cured.

In another section, close to Sherbrooke, where is produced one of the articles of which Canada boasts of controlling a large percentage of the world's supply, the candidates stated on all the hustings that because Mr. R. B. Bennett was connected with the big business men of Canada he would supply with his friends the necessary capital to put these mines on their feet as they had never been before. I do not intend to discuss this situation because the hon. member for Megantic (Mr. Roberge) will probably do so, but in Thetford Mines to-day they are producing asbestos at the lowest rate ever prevailing since the Conservatives were last in power. More than that, in the town of Black Lake, not one single mine is operating and the asbestos industry is practically ruined in that section.

If the Prime Minister were in his seat I would direct his attention to the statement he made yesterday on the floor of this house. He said that he would never consent to unemployment insurance, but I say to-night that if the manufacturers of Canada have to take on unemployment insurance in the near future they can date the cause back to the present government's attitude towards the needs of this country.

I have every respect for the hon. Minister of Labour (Senator Robertson); he is a personal friend of mine, but I say that the Minister of Labour of the government of

Canada has no right to be anywhere else than in a seat on the floor of this house. In view of the present conditions prevailing he should stand up and tell us what he intends to do.

Another cause of our defeat during the last campaign was the drop in agricultural prices, and in this connection I would like to give a few comparisons. The first thing the eastern township agriculturist has to sell is stock. I do not mean paper stock; I mean live stock. The prices on the 15th day of July, 1930 and on March 1 of this year in the town of Len-noxville, the marketing centre next to Sherbrooke in the eastern townships, were as follows:

Prices paid Prices paid

Julv March

15.1930 1. 1931 Decreaseper pound per pound per poundLive stock cents cents centsFat steers. . 6 to 8 4 to 54 2 to 24Fat cows . . 4 to 6 2 to 34 2 to 24Fat heifers . 5 to 7 3 to 44 2 to 24Canners. . . 24 to 3 1 to 14 14Veal calves . 8 to 10 5 to 7 3Drinkers . . 4 to 5 2 to 3 2Hogs.... 9 to 10 5 to 6 4Sows.... 74 to 8 4 to 5 34Lambs. . . . 7 to 9 44 to 64 24Sheep. . . . 44 to 54 2 to 3 24Let it be remembered that this year in

the month of March we should be getting a fairly decent price for these products, and I am comparing them, I think not unreasonably, with summer prices.

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An hon. MEMBER:

Will the hon. member say where he is quoting the prices?

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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

I have covered my last point and that is the reduced purchasing power. The other day I was riding on the train and went into the smoking car where there were six other men discussing that most popular question, the existing situation. They were discussing what this government was doing, what the other government had not done, and so forth, and one of them said, "Can you tell me why, with eggs at 15 cents a dozen and all other farm products at the lowest prices they have been for years, the people do not start to buy and live on these products?" I leave it to any man in this house to say how many eggs or how much lamb or pork or any other food a man with five children and a wife to support could buy with $8.88 for a week's work. Do you know what they have to do, Mr. Speaker?-and I am proud to say that they can do it. They buy a big piece of heavy meat, with the bone in the centre, a piece of extra good quality at the lowest price, and of that they make the most nourishing food, which is soup, and they buy bread and use it without butter, hoping for the time when the Liberal government will be back in power again and men will get at least a living wage.

In case some hon. gentlemen may think that these cases are overdrawn, let me say that I am not speaking of men who started to work only a few weeks ago. A man recently came to my office who had been in the service of a certain company for sixteen years. He was a sober, hard-working, industrious man, and for sixteen years, almost the best part of his life, he had been working for that same concern. He worked fifty-five hours and he drew $15 for a whole week's pay, after sixteen years of faithful service. Before the last election that same man, doing the very same job for the very same company, drew a minimum of from $23 to $25 a week, so there was a shrinkage of $10 a week in his pay since this government came into office. When the previous government was in power he was running two slubbers in a cotton mill; to-day he is running four slubbers at a reduced wage of $10 per week. I tell you, Mr. Speaker, that these are things that make one wonder where we are going to get off at.

The hon. member for Brome-Missisquoi, speaking in this house the other evening, took a great deal of credit for industries which he said had recently been established in the town of Farnham. Everybody rejoices when new industries come into our towns, especially in the eastern townships; but let us have the facts as they are. One of those industries, is a plush

[Mr. Howard.1

factory. It was established in the town of Farnham in 1929, under the administration of my right hon. leader who now sits on this side of the house. Another industry is the big linoleum concern. That was astablished in 1930, before the present government came into power, before it was ever dreamed that it would come into power. The other industry is the silk factory. It is true that that factory in the hon. gentleman's riding is fairly prosperous, but he did not tell this house that this silk company got an increased protection, and reduced the wages of every man 25 per cent. The men went on strike, and they only came back to work two weeks ago Monday at the reduced rate. The enamel industry, the only other industry in that part of the country, was started back in 1922, under the administration of my right hon. leader. My hon. friend had a special way of conducting his campaign. I suppose anybody can conduct his campaign as he sees fit, but speaking at Knowlton he said, "To hell with the national debt, but let us do something for the farmers." I ask him now what has this government done for the farmers of his constituency. My hon. friend stated on every platform in Mansonville, Brome, Knowlton and other places, that the King government was paying only 60 per cent compensation for cattle that had been slaughtered for tuberculosis, and he said that he had the right to say on behalf of the Right Hon. Mr. Bennett that if that gentleman came into power his government would paj' the balance of 40 per cent for every cow slaughtered in his constituency. Naturally the farmers voted for him. I would like to ask him- if the government have yet paid any of that balance.

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CON

Follin Horace Pickel

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. PICKEL:

Mr. Speaker, I deny that statement totally, and I ask the hon. gentleman to withdraw it.

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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

Speaking at Sherbrooke, as reported in the Sherbrooke Daily Record-

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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

A point of order has been raised, Mr. Speaker, and we ask you to decide it.

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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

I will withdraw, to save time, Mr. Speaker.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh, oh.

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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

The Sherbrooke Daily

Record, which supported my hon. friend, which indeed was one of his very best friends, reported my hon. friend as follows-and I ask the members from western Canada on both sides of the house to pay particular

The Address-Mr. Howard

the associated boards of trade in Sherbrooke, he said:

The western farmers also came in for considerable criticism. They were termed the greatest menace that the east has to contend with at the present time, and it was the opinion of Dr. Pickel that although everything had been done for them they would never be satisfied.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Do you deny

that?

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LIB

William Henry Moore

Liberal

Mr. MOORE (Chateauguay):

May I ask a question?

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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

I did not intend to make the following statement, but as my hon. friend from Chateauguay-Huntingdon (Mr. Moore) is on his feet, I will state this: The other night he compared the offices that were being held at the present time by the Hon. L. A. Taschereau, Premier of Quebec, with the offices held by the Prime Minister of Canada, and said that they were exactly the same. But there is this difference. Mr. Taschereau has been doing double work, has been acting as premier and also as provincial treasurer because in the county where he tried to elect his provincial treasurer they turned him down. But when the next election comes in that province, the same man, Mr. Gordon Scott, will run again and will be elected as provincial treasurer. Mr. Taschereau, all honour to him, has been carrying the two portfolios in order to preserve an old tradition, that the provincial treasurer should represent the English protestant minority in that province.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

William Henry Moore

Liberal

Mr. MOORE (Chateauguay):

May I ask my hon. friend a question?

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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LIB

Charles Benjamin Howard

Liberal

Mr. HOWARD:

Turning now to trade

figures, our imports have dropped 8290,000,000 and our exports have dropped $296,000,000 since this government came into power. For the past six months our trade figures were as follows and I would like to underline this in view of the publicity which the present government has received throughout Canada: The imports into Canada in the six months just ended were valued at 8465,000,000 and the exports at only S449,000,000. That is the story, Mr. Speaker.

In closing let me say that the so-called "Canada first" policy of the Prime Minister has increased unemployment in Canada since the election. That same so-called Canada first policy has lowered the prices of agricultural products and in every case has caused injustice to our farmers. That same so-called Canada first policy has placed our Canadian wheat at a price lower than that of the United States. It has decreased Canada's world

trade; it has lowered our standard of living and it has lost to Canada some of her very best markets. We have heard a great deal about the money which was granted by this house to help unemployment. I do not wish to be critical. I will do better than that. I promise the government of to-day my cooperation in any scheme they put forward before next spring which will remedy the situation I see coming. Of the money which has been given out at the present time the city of Sherbrooke was to receive $87,500, and two-thirds of $21,000, or $14,000 in direct relief. They hare borrowed the money, and taken care of the people, but they have not received one single nickel up to the present time.

Topic:   SPEECH FROM THE THRONE
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ADDRESS IN REPLY
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April 16, 1931