March 18, 1931

CON

Pierre Édouard Blondin (Speaker of the Senate)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPEAKER:

The question of privilege has been fully stated and, as I said at the outset, the hon. member for Weybum and every other hon. member will at all times be accorded their proper privileges.

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PRIVILEGE-MR. QUINN

CON

Felix Patrick Quinn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. F. P. QUINN (Halifax):

Mr. Speaker,

I rise to a question of privilege. I wish to draw the attention of the house to an article which appeared in the morning and evening editions of the Ottawa Citizen of March 17. That article reflects upon me and upon my conduct in this house. I will read it.

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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

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CON

Felix Patrick Quinn

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. QUINN:

Under the heading of

"Claquers" appears the following:

Mr. Mackenzie King has profound respect for parliamentary institutions. He admonished Premier Bennett yesterday to be more heedful of the advice of ministers and members around him. The level of political intelligence as reflected by noisy interrupters on the government side, however, would amply justify the prime minister's somewhat scant regard for this current form of political democracy. Members like Messrs. Cotnam, Felix Quinn, Eccles Gott and others, normal individuals outside the chamber, seem to labour under the belief that the elaquer is an essential part of the machinery of parliament. They should really be furnished with paper caps and penny rattles.

I desire, Mr. Speaker, to contradict what is imputed to me in this article. I did not in any way whatever interrupt or interfere with the address of the right hon. gentleman, and through you, sir, I am going to ask the Ottawa Citizen to give my denial as much prominence as it gave this article which I have just read.

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LIB

Jean-François Pouliot

Liberal

Mr. POULIOT:

Did the hon. gentleman

speak for his colleagues as well.

Copyright Act

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COPYRIGHT ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. C. H. CAHAN (Secretary of State) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 4, to amend the Copyright Act.


LIB
CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan (Secretary of State of Canada)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CAHAN:

This amendment to the

existing Copyright Aot is intended to provide, among other sections, one authorizing the governor in council to deposit at Rome ratification on behalf of Canada of the Rome Copyright convention of 1928, which was then signed on behalf of Canada by a representative of the preceding government; to inseit certain definitions in the act so as to cover changes necessary for the enforcement of certain provisions of the Rome Copyright convention; to modify section 40 of the existing act with regard to registration, concerning which complaints were made to the previous government as to its not being in strict conformity with the Berne convention, which the Rome convention now modifies; and lastly to provide for the regulation of companies, associations and societies which engage in the business of granting performing rights in respect of works in which copyright subsists. After the second reading of the bill, if it passes second reading, I propose to ask the house to refer it to a special committee to consider its provisions, as the questions involved in copyright are very complex. We have received a great number of representations in regard to it; and it may meet the approval of the house to refer the bill to a special committee for further consideration after second reading.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ACT


Hon. R. J. MANION (Minister of Railways and Canals) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 5, to amend the Canadian National Railways Act.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Explain.

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CON

Robert James Manion (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

This bill is for the purpose of increasing the number of directors of the Canadian National Railways from fifteen to seventeen, with the object ultimately of giving representation to two of the provinces which at the present time have no representatives on the railway board. There is a second section which is merely intended to correct a technical error in the existing legislation.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

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FISH INSPECTION ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. E. N. RHODES (Minister of Fisheries) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 6, to amend the Fish Inspection Act.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

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CON

Edgar Nelson Rhodes (Minister of Fisheries)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RHODES:

This bill proposes certain

amendments to the existing Fish Inspection Act. Their object is to make more effective the methods of inspection including, in certain cases, compulsory inspection. The bill also provides for the inspection of containers for fish, and their marking as specified by regulation.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

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CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT


Mr. ARMAND R. LaVERGNE (Mont-magny) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 7, to amend the Criminal Code. He said: The object of the bill is to amend the Criminal Code in order, first, that the defence shall address the jury after the crown has done so. Up to the present time an accused has had to defend himself before knowing exactly how he would be attacked before the jury. The bill provides, secondly, that the judge presiding at the court should be allowed to comment on law only and not on facts. The third provision is that the assizes in the province of Quebec shall be presided over by judges of the session of appeal instead of judges of the Court of King's Bench. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


March 18, 1931