May 20, 1930

LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

No change.

Topic:   AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS, MAY 19 AND 20, 1930
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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Through what ports do we get our bananas at the present time?

Topic:   AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS, MAY 19 AND 20, 1930
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

The only change here is to provide for the re-numbering. Following the inauguration of the direct steamship service with the West Indies at the beginning of the fiscal year 1929-30, the old item 90b was can-

Ways and Means-Customs Tariff

celled on May 2, 1929, after which date bananas entered Canada under two items, 90c and 90d, Imports under the old item 90b during the fiscal year 1928-29 were valued at $5,246,000, of which $5,207,000 came from the United States, and $39,000 from Jamaica. That was before the new arrangement went into effect. It has not been possible to obtain an advance publication of statistics of imports during the year just closed. I know we have brought in a tremendous quantity from the West Indies.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Through Canadian ports?

Topic:   AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS, MAY 19 AND 20, 1930
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

Yes.

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CON

Robert Edwy Ryerson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RYERSON:

I think we should have figures of the quantity imported under the new arrangement.

Topic:   AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS, MAY 19 AND 20, 1930
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

Yes.

Topic:   AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS, MAY 19 AND 20, 1930
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

Speaking from memory, I think Sir Henry Thornton said that about a million bunches came by Halifax.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

What were the proportions by Canadian ports and from the United States?

Mr. DUNNING': The information is not available. In a general way I can say the arrangement is developing very fast indeed via our own Canadian National steamship service.

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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

According to Sir Henry Thornton, about a million bunches came in by St. John and a million bunches by Halifax.

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CON

Thomas Cantley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CANTLEY:

I think it will be found that practically all the bananas coming into Canada to-day enter through Canadian ports. The United Fruit Company formerly brought in bananas through Boston. With the change of duty last year they brought in the great bulk through St. John. The West Indies steamers brought them in through both Halifax and St. John, and in the summer months through Montreal. So practically all our bananas now come in through Canadian ports.

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CON

Robert Edwy Ryerson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. RYERSON:

I beg to disagree with that statement. Very few bananas from Jamaica go west of Port Arthur; those reaching points further west come the other way from the Pacific coast.

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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

I have some proof sheets of figures from the statistical department, which I have every reason to believe are correct. The total imports from the United States for the fiscal year 1930 were, 1,188,000 bunches, and from Jamaica 2,729,000 bunches. The trade completely turned over in the fiscal year 1930 as compared with the previous year.

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Item agreed to. Customs tariff-9Sa. Bananas, n.o.p., per stem or bunch: British preferential tariff, 50 cents; intermediate tariff, 50 cents; general tariff, 50 cents. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-99. Bananas, dried or evaporated, per pound: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, J cent; general tariff, i cent. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-99a. Dates and figs, dried; plums and prunes, dried, unpitted; per pound: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, | cent; general tariff, | cent. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-99b. Fruits, dried, desiccated, evaporated or dehydrated, n.o.p.: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 22| per cent; general tariff, 25 per cent. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-100. Grapefruit, when imported from the place of growth by ship, direct to a Canadian port, per pound: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, J cent; general tariff, 1 cent. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-100a. Grapefruit, n.o.p., per pound: British preferential tariff, J cent; intermediate tariff, 1 cent; general tariff, 1 cent. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-'102. Limes: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, 15 per cent; general tariff, 15 per cent. Item agreed to. Customs tariff-105. Fruit pulp, with sugar or not, n.o.p., and fruits, frozen, per pound: British preferential tariff, li cents; intermediate tariff, 2J cents; general tariff, 3 cents.


LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

In view of the fact that we are allowing the item of grapes to stand I think it would be just as well to let stand the item concerning fruit pulp until we have made the necessary inquiries in regard to crushed grapes.

Item stands.

Customs tariff-105a. Lemon and orange rinds and citron in brine: British preferential tariff, free; intermediate tariff, free; general tariff, free.

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Item agreed to. Customs tariff-105b. Olives and cherries in brine, not bottled: British preferential tariff, 10 per cent; intermediate tariff, 17J per cent; general tariff, 30 per cent.


LIB

James Houston Spence

Liberal

Mr. SPENCE:

I would like to ask the amount of imports of cherries from France and Italy.

Ways and Means-Customs Tariff

Topic:   AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS, MAY 19 AND 20, 1930
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

This extends the former item No. 89. The new item will include cherries, whereas the old item did not. It seemed to the department that cherries in brine should be placed with olives in brine. Previously cherries were not included. Olives were imported to the value of $75,000, of which $43,000 worth came from the United States and $26,000 worth came from Greece. The new wording will also include olives in bulk for the manufacture of pickles, which in 1929 entered to the value of $269,000, of which total sum $224,000 worth came from Spain and $34,000 worth came from the United States. As far as cherries in brine are concerned they were formerly included as pickles under item 88, but the value was not traceable. We cannot tell how much came in because they were mixed with pickles in general.

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LIB

James Houston Spence

Liberal

Mr. SPENCE:

This is a very important fact, and represents one of the worst features with which the fruit trade of this country has had to contend since the French treaty was passed. At the present time there is no demand whatever for cherries in Canada. The extract people and the people who used them are importing their cherries from Italy and France by the barrel and by the carload while Canadian cherries are not used. It was found that the Richmond cherry was not satisfactory, and the growers developed the Montmorency cherry which was satisfactory for the Canadian trade. When the French treaty was signed the extract people, who are the chief importers, brought cherries from France and Italy, and the result is that there is no sale for Canadian cherries no matter how good they may be. Sweet cherries are sold in considerable quantities, however. A few years ago the growers planted thousands of trees to accommodate the trade, and as a result of the transfer of trade they have had to tear them out. The French treaty was agreed to in 1923 and from that date forward the sale of cherries has dwindled. You now propose a further reduction of about 10 per cent in the duty. In my opinion, instead of reducing the tariff 10 per cent it should be increased a like amount. The cherry interests which at one time represented one of the greatest fruit industries are now almost completely wiped out. There must have been hundreds of thousands of tons imported.

Topic:   AS AMENDED IN COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS, MAY 19 AND 20, 1930
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

Cherries in brine came in as pickles, and under the French treaty they would have been carrying a duty of 32J per cent.

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May 20, 1930