April 8, 1930

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Not the High Commissioner's office.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

They rent a part of the Sun Life building.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I believe the Department of Health and Pensions has an office in the Sun Life building.

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CON

Hugh Guthrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Then apart from the

amount contributed by the public works department, do I understand there is no other expense to Canada in the maintenance of the High Commissioner's office in London? The $34,000 from public works and the $117,260 in this vote represent the total?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The $34,000

contributed by the public works department and the $117,260 for salaries and expenses, I understand, cover the entire cost. I might mention that the following departments of the Canadian government are represented in the Canada building together with the High Commissioner's office: immigration, trade and commerce, agriculture, customs, soldiers' civil re-establishment, Secretary of State. There are other offices not in the Canada building for archives and air.

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CON

George Reginald Geary

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GEARY:

Are these departments

charged with rental outside this amount?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am advised not.

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CON

George Reginald Geary

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GEARY:

No charge is made to them at all?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Not for those housed in the High Commissioner's office.

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CON

Hugh Guthrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

I understand part of this building is occupied as living quarters by some of the officials, and that in consequence you have to go out and rent other quarters. Is that correct?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I believe for

a time the secretary occupied part of the space on the top floor, but I understand he has not occupied it for some time past. Since Mr. Larkin's death my impression is that word came from the secretary that it might better suit his convenience and the convenience of the office if he returned temporarily to the particular quarters which he had formerly occupied, and he may be there at the moment; but if he is, it is purely temporary occupation.

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CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHURCH:

Mr. Chairman, while I

do not wish to criticize this particular vote, in my opinion the country is not getting the full advantage it should get from having this office in the old country. All the men who have filled the position of High Commissioner have done so with a great deal of credit and cost to themselves and no doubt they did the best they could for Canada; but I think if the country is to get the full benefit of this vote there should be some reorganization and expansion of the functions of the office. A large number of the duties of this office at present are of a social nature at the expense of the economic, and these duties have been increasing in the past year. When I compare the work that is being done by Australia House in the interests of the commonwealth with that done by Canada House for this Dominion, I find that Australia House is doing all the window dressing in trade and migration and is taking a prominent part in helping to solve the problems of the empire. In order to bring the products of Australia before the people of the old country and the advantages it offers to immigrants, Australia House has opened sub-agencies throughout the motherland while ours is in London alone. I am told that at the trade exhibition held in England last year Canada was not very well represented, and that Australia, New Zealand and the other dominions got a great deal more advertising. The old country papers that I read reported that Australia was doing all the window dressing as regards immigration, and opening new avenues of trade, and so on. I think Canada House might be doing

educational work with respect to marketing Canadian goods and products along economic lines. Since the 26th of January we have had representatives in London at a peace parley. You would almost think it was a six-power instead of a five-power parley. We are gradually interfering in the affairs of Europe generally. It will be noticed that the total vote for the Department of External Affairs now is over $610,000. With this present government it seems to be all external and nothing internal-we are posing as a nation when we are not a nation at all. I regret the death of the late High Commissioner. I am afraid he was not appreciated as a public servant should be. He was a man of high ideals and imbued with a strong sense of public duty. He did a great deal of good work for Canada both at home and in Great Britain. I am not criticizing the work done by him. I believe a lot of good work was done by him to advertise Canada and bring British capital here, but I believe a great deal more could be done in this connection by expanding the functions of the office. What is Canada House doing to-day? What is the function of the High Commissioner's office at the present time Doctor Skelton in his report to the Minister says that the duties of the office are growing, and they are taking on work that they did not do before. I do not know that it is the duty of the High Commissioner to visit every province in Canada and tell what he is doing in London. I think he should devote the whole of his attention to promoting the

interests of Canada in the old land. This Australian House has been doing a great deal of missionary work which Canada House does not do. It is doing a great deal towards advertising Australia and towards promoting trade between Australia and Great Britain. It has taken up the new problems which have arisen out of unemployment, and is checking immigration with the old land. On the other hand the immigrants who arrive in Toronto are left stranded. We have the case of a man with his wife and family in distressed circumstances; their particular case finds its way to the newspapers, and when we inquire who was responsible for bringing them here the Immigration department denies all responsibility. The governmental agencies should be coordinated and should cooperate with each other. If Canada House is to exist it should assume new functions, and should check its work not only throughout the continent, but in Great Britain. In my opinion there are many other matters which might be taken up by Canada House. If the duties

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lii6S

of that agency were less of a social character and directed more towards problems of economy, we would receive greater value from Canada House than we have received in the past.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I want to ask the Prime Minister (Mr. MacKenzie King) a question. An inquiry reached me the other day as to whether or not .the official salary of the High Commissioner for Canada is subject to income tax in Great Britain. I was unable to give a definite answer.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

My understanding is that all High Commissioners have recently been exempted from the payment of income tax.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Do they pay a tax at

home? '

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am afraid I cannot answer that.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I do not know, either,

but I was asked that question.

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CON

George Halsey Perley

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir GEORGE PERLEY:

May I be allowed to say that when I was High Commissioner I always paid an income tax in Canada on my salary but not on the contingencies. I may say that the income tax commissioners in Great Britain .thought that the High Commissioner should pay a tax in that country, but I objected to it. I brought the matter before the Chancellor of the Exchequer. Although the officials considered that under the law the High Commissioner was liable in Great Britain for income tax on his salary, I considered that such payment was not fair; I took the ground that it would be the Canadian government who would have to pay the tax, in case payment was insisted upon. I said that, as the High Commissioner paid income tax in Canada, he would naturally consider that the Dominion should pay any income tax in Great Britain, and that such a payment would be inconsistent with the position of the Dominion of Canada. The Chancellor of the Exchequer agreed with me, and the Treasury thereupon arranged to pay to the income tax commissioners the amount for which they considered1 the High Commissioner might be legally liable in Great Britain.

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Item agreed to. Washington-representation, including salaries and allowances for minister plenipotentiary, secretaries and staff, notwithstanding anything to the contrary in the Civil Service Act, or any of its amendments, $100,000.


CON

Thomas Erlin Kaiser

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. KAISER:

1370 COMMONS

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sire to remain a nation, we fix our policy to suit ourselves, we are to be told that we harbour the spirit of ill will towards these people. I have no desire to discuss the matter further, except to say that I think that statement of the Prime Minister was one of a very shocking nature. If he can show me where such a spirit exists in the old Tory homes of Ontario, then he will have shown me something which I have been unable to find in forty years of medical practice.

I think this vote should be analyzed. I am not so certain but that Mr. Massey is doing good work. I know that he gives splendid entertainments to the high class people who go to Washington from Canada; he is a magnificent entertainer, but this is being done at the expense of the common people of Canada and I am not so sure that we are obtaining full value for the money expended.

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April 8, 1930