March 31, 1930

PRIVATE BILL

FIRST READING


Bill No. 46, to incorporate The Premier Life Insurance Company.-Mr. Mercier (Laurier-Outremont). Permanent Court-Optional Clause


INTERNATIONAL PEACE


PERMANENT COURT OP INTERNATIONAL JUSTICE, OPTIONAL CLAUSE [DOT]


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, I beg to lay on the table a copy of the declaration under article 36 of the statute of the permanent court of international justice, with respect to the optional clause which was signed at Geneva on September 20, 1929, on behalf of the Dominion of Canada.

This declaration covers only part of a foolscap sheet, and with the permission of the house I would suggest it be printed in Hansard so that it will be available for reference by members in that form.

Topic:   INTERNATIONAL PEACE
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I think that is very

desirable, Mr. Speaker.

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LAB
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I have just

suggested, and, the hon. leader of the opposition has agreed, that it might be preferable to print the declaration in Hansard; then it will be available to all hon. members.

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LAB

Herbert Bealey Adshead

Labour

Mr. ADSHEAD:

There are others besides members of the house who would like to get a copy.

The declaration follows:

Permanent Court Of International Justice Declaration made by the Hon. Raoul Dandurand, before signing the optional clause on behalf of His Majesty's government in Canada

Geneva, September 20, 1929.

On behalf of His Majesty's government in Canada and subject to ratification, I accept as compulsory "ipso facto" and without special convention, on condition of reciprocity, the jurisdiction of the court in conformity with article 36, paragraph 2, of the statute, for a period of ten years and thereafter until such time as notice may be given to terminate the acceptance, over all disputes arising after ratification of the present declaration with regard to situations or facts subsequent to said ratification, other than:

disputes in regard to which parties have agreed or shall agree to have recourse to some other method of peaceful settlement, and

disputes with the government of any other member of the league which is a member of the British commonwealth of nations, all of which disputes shall be settled in such manner as the parties have agreed or shall agree, and disputes with regard to questions which by international law fall exclusively within the jurisdiction of the Dominion of Canada,

and subject to the condition that His Majesty's government in Canada reserve the right to require that proceedings in the court 2419-69

shall be suspended in respect of any dispute which has been submitted to and is under consideration by the Council of the League of Nations, provided that notice to suspend is given after the dispute has been submitted to the council and is given within ten days of the notification of the initiation of the proceedings in the court, and provided also that such suspension shall be limited to a period of twelve months or such longer period as may be agreed by the parties to the dispute or determined by a decision of all the members of the council other than the parties to the dispute.

R. Dandurand. NATURAL RESOURCES

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CORRESPONDENCE WITH MANITOBA, ALBERTA AND SASKATCHEWAN-ORDER FOR PRINTING

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I beg to lay on the table copies of the correspondence with respect to the transfer of the natural resources as they relate to the provinces of Manitoba, Alberta and Saskatchewan. This is the correspondence subsequent to that which was brought down last session. The correspondence with respect to Manitoba relates almost exclusively to the fixing of dates for a conference and it would not serve any useful purpose to have it reprinted; but I think the correspondence respecting Alberta and Saskatchewan should be printed and made available in that form.

I would move therefore:

That 1,500 copies be printed in English and 750 copies in French of the correspondencebetween the governments of the Dominion and the province of Saskatchewan respecting the transfer of the natural resources of

Saskatchewan tabled this day; and that standing order 64 be suspended in relation thereto.

Topic:   CORRESPONDENCE WITH MANITOBA, ALBERTA AND SASKATCHEWAN-ORDER FOR PRINTING
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Motion agreed to.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I beg to move:

That 1,500 copies be printed in English and750 copies in French of the correspondence

between the governments of the Dominion and the province of Alberta respecting the transfer of the natural resources of Alberta tabled this day; and that standing order 64 be suspended in relation thereto.

Topic:   CORRESPONDENCE WITH MANITOBA, ALBERTA AND SASKATCHEWAN-ORDER FOR PRINTING
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Motion agreed to.


DEBATES COMMITTEE

LIB

Edward James Young

Liberal

Mr. E. J. YOUNG (Weybum) moved:

That the select standing committee appointed to supervise the official reports of the debates of the House of Commons have leave to sit while the house is in session.

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Motion agreed to.


PRINTING OF PUBLIC DOCUMENTS

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, before the order

Printing o) Public Documents

of motion is proceeded with further, might I ask the right hon. Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) if he does not think that in connection with matters of great public concern the correspondence and papers should be tabled without a formal motion. It has been the custom in England to print what is called a white paper containing such documents. It has occurred to me that correspondence in connection with the Economic conference, for instance, should be brought down as a matter of duty rather than in response to a motion. There are. other papers dealing with similar matters that it has been the custom in England, as I have said, to present to the house at once so that members might see them without a motion being made for the purpose. I think it is desirable in matters of great public importance to follow this practice.

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March 31, 1930