March 20, 1930

CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS REPORT


On the orders of the day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition) :

I would like to ask the hon. the Minister of Finance (Mr. Dunning), acting for the Minister of Railways (Mr. Crerar), when we may expect the report of the Canadian National Railways for the year ending 31st December, and when the special committee will be set up.

Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance): In the absence of the minister, I can only say that I know he is pressing for the completion of the report which, of course, always precedes the setting up of the special committee. I know that the minister is

anxious to bring it down as soon as possible, and my hon. friend's inquiry will be helpful in that regard.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS REPORT
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PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY


On the orders of the day:


LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Winnipeg North Centre):

Is it a fact that the building of the car ferry for Prince Edward Island has been let to the province of Quebec? I have a protest from Halifax stating that the wages in Quebec are much lower than in Halifax.

Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Finance): Speaking for the Minister of Railways, I can only say that the contract for the Prince Edward Island ferry was let to the lowest tenderer. My recollection is that it is the Davie Shipbuilding Company of Levis, Quebec, and, of course, the contract will contain the usual protective clauses with respect to labour.

Topic:   PRINCE EDWARD ISLAND FERRY
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TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

BEATTY REPORT


On the orders of the day:


PRO

Milton Neil Campbell

Progressive

Mr. M. N. CAMPBELL (Mackenzie):

I would like to ask if it is the intention of the government to submit to a committee of this house, for consideration, the report of the royal commission on technical services, a report that is usually referred to as the Beatty report.

Topic:   TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Subtopic:   BEATTY REPORT
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LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

The report was tabled some time ago.

Topic:   TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Subtopic:   BEATTY REPORT
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PRO

Milton Neil Campbell

Progressive

Mr. CAMPBELL:

The minister misunderstands my question. Is it the intention of the government to submit that report to a special committee of this house for consideration.

Topic:   TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Subtopic:   BEATTY REPORT
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I mentioned, I think, some days ago, that there would be an opportunity to discuss all phases of the report when we are taking up the estimates relating to the civil service. The government itself, will wish to consider the report very carefully and *will give to the house its reasons with respect to the action that it takes upon it. There will be ample opportunity afforded to everyone to discuss the matter and to make any desired representations.

Topic:   TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Subtopic:   BEATTY REPORT
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Which must be financial.

Topic:   TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL SERVICES
Subtopic:   BEATTY REPORT
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EXPORT ACT AMENDMENT

ENQUIRY AS TO THE FILLING OF SENATE VACANCIES


On the orders of the day.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

My hon. friend has just

Export Act

reminded me of his inquiry a day or two ago with regard to appointments to be made to the Senate. Perhaps I might read the question, which was put in my absence, because I am not sure whether it was as much intended to elicit information with regard to the Senate as it was to afford my hon. friend an opportunity to repeat something which he had previously said with regard-

Topic:   EXPORT ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   ENQUIRY AS TO THE FILLING OF SENATE VACANCIES
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Something the hon.

gentleman had said.

Topic:   EXPORT ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   ENQUIRY AS TO THE FILLING OF SENATE VACANCIES
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

What I was supposed to have said, in regard to an alleged menace

I think these were his words-from the country to the south with respect to possible happenings consequent upon the smuggling of liquor into the United States. My hon. friend's question is:

In view of the statement made by the Prime Minister as to the grave danger that at any moment may arise on the international frontier, by reason of the granting of clearances to the United States of vessels laden in whole or in part with intoxicating liquors, is it the intention of the government before the measure now before this house prohibiting such clearances is proceeded with in the second chamber of parliament, to fill the five vacancies that now exist in the membership of the Senate?

Perhaps, Mr. Speaker, I might be permitted, before I answer the last part of the question, to answer the implication in the first part. My hon. friend did, I think, in his remarks the other day, endeavour to convey the impression that I had intimated that we were fearful because of some action threatened by the country to the south if a certain procedure with respect to transportation of liquor were to be continued. I had spoken of Lord Curzon's representations at the imperial conference, and in that connection my hon. friend rather lead the house to believe that Lord Curzon had referred to threats which were made by the United States toward Britain. I think the remarks of Lord Curzon were very clear, and do not admit of any doubtful interpretation. They were to the effect that a delicate and difficult situation might arise if a certain procedure were continued. Lord Curzon did not say that anything was threatening. He said that something might at some time arise which would be most embarrassing, and it was advisable to avoid anything of the kind. I paralleled that point of view with respect to conditions in Canada, I did not say that the United States was in any way threatening action with respect to Canada if the present practices were continued. What, to all intents and -purposes, I did say was that a delicate and difficult situation might arise at any time if the practice which is in vogue to-day were to continue, namely the procedure whereby

TMr. Mackenzie King.]

liquor to be smuggled into the United States is released from distilleries at the instance of government officials, and its transportation to the border facilitated under permits given by government officials, and its deliverence into the hands of rum runners effected by clearances granted by government officials, all such officials knowing that the liquor thus released and transported is destined for the United States, and that its importation into that country is prohibited by law, and that it can only get into that country by the operations of persons who violate the laws of the United States. That was the representation I made, and what I had reference to was the embarrassing position in which this country would find itself in the event of an international incident arising out of attempted smuggling in which it would be made quite apparent that but for the action of officials of the government of Canada facilitating its release, transportation and clearance, the liquor in question could not have come into the possession of rum runners to be smuggled into the United States.

With regard to my hon. friend's question as to appointments to the Senate, I am sure that he will be pleased to know that one appointment was made to-day, and that a former Minister of Labour in the present administration, the Hon. James Murdock, has been appointed a member of the Senate. Other appointments to the Senate will be announced in due course.

Topic:   EXPORT ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   ENQUIRY AS TO THE FILLING OF SENATE VACANCIES
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March 20, 1930