March 19, 1930

CON

Mr. SMITH (Cumberland):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What quantity of anthracite coal was imported into Canada during the calendar year 1929, stating country of origin?

2. What quantity of bituminous coal was imported into Canada during the calendar year 1929, stating country of origin?

3. What quantity of coal of all kinds was exported from Canada during 1929, stating provinces of origin and country of destination.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COAL IMPORTATIONS
Permalink
LIB

Mr. MALCOLM: (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

1. Canada's imports of anthracite coal, calendar year 1929, with country from which imported, were:

Country T ons

United Kingdom

729,458United States

3,172,942Alaska

1Japan

112Russia

117,404Total

4,019,9172. Canada's imports of bituminous coal, calendar year 1929, with country from which imported, were:Country TonsUnited Kingdom

114.044United States

13,593,402Alaska

21Newfoundland

76Total

13,707,5433. Canada's exports of coal of all kinds, calendar year 1929, with country to which exported, were:Canadian Foreign Country produce produce

Tons Tons

United Kingdom. .. 26,605

United States 451,516 16,842

Alaska 21,642

Argentina 1,066

Australia 19,225

Belgium 3,463

Bermuda 950

British South Africa. 12,089

China 4,994

Cuba 3S0

Denmark 758

France 5,108

Germany 2,140

Questions

Canadian

Country produce

Tons

Gibraltar 1,335

Greece 1,085

Irish Free State.. .. 683

Italy 3,327

Netherlands 5,247

Newfoundland 269,168

New Zealand 6,752

Norway 421

Poland and Danzig.. 371

Spain 916

St. Pierre and

Miquelon 2,248

Sweden 552

Syria 290

Turkey 641

Foreign

produce

Tons

7

Total 842,972 17,436

Note:-No statistics available as to exports of coal according to provinces of origin. During the calendar year 1929 the exports of coal

(Canadian produce) from Canada via provinces were:

Exports via Tons

Nova Scotia 351,176

New Brunswick 20,609

Quebec 130

Ontario 3,480

Saskatchewan 8,227

Alberta 1,060

British Columbia 458,290

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COAL IMPORTATIONS
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IMMIGRATION TO ALBERTA


Mr, KELLNER: 1. Have any immigrants come to the province of Alberta during 1930? 2. If so, how many, and from what country or countries did they come? 3. Who provided for their importation?


LIB

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton): (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. The records are available only for the month of January, during which month 290 immigrants arrived at ports of entry giving Alberta as their destination. These were of the following racial origins. The records available do not show in every case the country from which the immigrants came.

Austrian i

British-

English 50

Irish 14

Scotch.. .. .. 22Welsh ' 4Croatian

2Dutch

iEsthonian

2Finnish

4French

3German

33Italian

3Jugo-Slav

3Lithuanian

4Magyar

23Polish

19Roumanian

3Russian

1Ruthenian

60

Scandinavian-

Danish 9

Norwegian 10

Swedish 8

Slovak 5

Swiss 1

Total 290

3. Some were admitted as domestics from the British isles coming under the auspices of the department. Some were admitted as moving under the railways' agreement, and others as joining relatives and friends.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMMIGRATION TO ALBERTA
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BIGGAR, SASKATCHEWAN, POST OFFICE

PRO

Mr. EVANS:

Progressive

1. What was the revenue from the post office of Biggar, Saskatchewan, for the past three years?

2. What salary was paid the postmaster at Biggar, Saskatchewan, for the past three years?

3. What was the rental of the building housing the post office at Biggar, Saskatchewan, for the past three years?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BIGGAR, SASKATCHEWAN, POST OFFICE
Permalink
LIB

Peter John Veniot (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Mr. VENIOT:

1, 2 and 3.

Year

Revenue Salary and allowance

$8,706 87 Salary $3,211 00

Night allowance

200 00Forward allowance

504 00Money order com

810 39Postal note com

30 80Rent allowance

688 00

Total

Questions

Year

1928-29

Revenue Salary and allowance

$10,767 14 Salary $3,21100

Night allowance

200 00Forward allowance

405 74Postal note com

29 75Money order com

855 40Rent allowance

688 00Total $5,389-89

$11,195 20 Salary including compensation for

money order business S4,021 00Night allowance

183 26Forward allowance

370 09Postal note com

35 55Rent allowance

719 00Total

$5,328 90

. ALBERTA RURAL MAIL ROUTES

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BIGGAR, SASKATCHEWAN, POST OFFICE
Permalink
UFA

Edward Joseph Garland

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. GARLAND (Bow River):

.

1. What is the total number of rural mail routes in the province of Alberta, and what are their respective locations?

2. What mileage was covered by rural mail courier in each route?

3. What is the amount paid to each of these couriers for their service in connection with each route?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BIGGAR, SASKATCHEWAN, POST OFFICE
Permalink
?

Mr. YENIOT:

1. 2 and 3. 173 rural routes; locations,

mileage per trip and amounts paid per annum as follows:-

Mileage

Name of route per Cost

trip

$ cts.

Alix No. 1 ... 27 423 69Balzac No. 1 ... m 425 00Balzac No. 2 ... 25f 470 00Barons No. 1 ... 37-9/10 700 00Big Valley No. 1 ... 30 550 00Blackfalds No. 1 ... 33* 700 00Biackie No. 1 ... 441 1,400 00Byemoor No. 1 ... 25 500 00Byemoor No. 2 .. . 28 520 00Calgary No. 2 ... 60 1,196 00Calgary No. 4 . .. 39 800 00Carmangay No. 1 ... 34 850 00Carstairs No. 1 ... 46 1,000 00Cayley No. 1 ... 26* 700 00Cayley No. 2 ... 24* 520 00Cochrane No. 1 ... 47 8 00 per trip or $832.00 per annum.Craigmyle No. 1 ... 36 648 00Craigmyle No. 2 ... 27* 553 93Craigmyle No. 3 .... 37* 725 37Crossfield No. 1 .... 38 60 00 per month or$720.00 per annum.Delburne No. 1 .... 21* 375 00Dc Winton No. 1 .... 42* 900 00Didsbury No. 1 .... 40 1,000 00Didsbury No. 2 .... 42| 1,100 00Eckville No. 1 .... 31 850 00Eckville No. 3 .... 36* 450 00

Mileage

Name of route per Cost

trip

Elnora No. 1.. Endiang No. 1 Endiang No. 2 Excel No. 1... Excel No. 2...

Fishburn No. 1

Ghost Pine Creek No. 1..

Halkirk No. 1

Halladay No. 1

Hanna No. 1

Hanna No. 3

Hanna No. 4

High River No. 1

High River No. 2

Huxley No. 1

Innisfail No. 1

Knee Hill Valley No. 1...

Lousana No. 1

Macleod No. 1

Midnapore No.l

Nevis No. 1

Nobleford No. 1

Okotoks No. 1

Penhold No. 1...

Red Deer No. 1... Red Deer No. 2... Red Deer No. 3... Red Deer No. 4...

Scapa No. 1

Scapa No. 2

Swalwell No. 1 - Three Hills No. 1. Three Hills No. 2

Trochu No. 1...

Vulcan No. 2....

Alliance N o; 1 - Ardrossan No. 1.. Ardrossan No. 2.. Barrhead No. 1.. Bashaw No. 1 - Bentley No. 1 - Bentley No. 2-

Bittern Lake No. 1

25 S cts. 520 00

28* 484 00

26 520 00

29*1 96 00 per

26*/ month or

26 $1,152.00 per annum. 500 00

26* 750 00

42 624 00

40 600 00

46* 799 00

38* 580 00

24 450 00

40* 666 12

58 1,300 94

25-3/10 520 00

34 1,056 13

26* 780 00

21-3/4 425 00

42-2/5 735 00

65 1,050 00

29-5/8 450 00

24* 58 50 per

35 month or $702 00 per annum. 1,500 00

44 733 33

52 1,200 00

42 600 00

26 500 00

32 500 00

23* 350 00

30 520 00

27 546 00

34 900 00

26* 650 00

26 476 00

46 1,000 00

45* 730 00

28 485 34

22 400 00

26 500 00

28 500 00

40 1,872 00

27 5 00 per trip

29* or $780 00 per annum. 850 00

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BIGGAR, SASKATCHEWAN, POST OFFICE
Permalink

REPARATIONS-CANADIAN IMPORTS

LAB

Herbert Bealey Adshead

Labour

Mir. ADSHEAD:

How much of Canada's imports from Germani is assigned under the Young plan to payment or reparations?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   REPARATIONS-CANADIAN IMPORTS
Permalink
LIB

Charles Avery Dunning (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. DUNNING:

None. Under tihe new plan established by the agreement with Germany of the 20th January, 1930, embodying the Young plan with modifications, Canada's share of reparations, which has no relation to its imports from Germany, will be credited in cash (in currency other than marks) with the bank for international settlements which is to 'be established at Basle, Switzerland.

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   REPARATIONS-CANADIAN IMPORTS
Permalink

REPARATIONS-CLAIMS

IND

Mr. NEILL:

Independent

1. Has the government received a number of claims too late to be included under the Reparations Payment Act of 1929?

2. Is it the intention of the government to have these claims investigated and pay those which are found to be justified?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   REPARATIONS-CLAIMS
Permalink
LIB

Mr. RINFRET: (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

1. Yes.

2. The Reparation Payment Act of 1929 made no provision for these claims.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   REPARATIONS-CLAIMS
Permalink

PORK AND PORK PRODUCTS-IMPORTATIONS

CON

Mr. SENN:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What quantities of bacon and hams, fresh pork and pork in brine were imported into Canada from the United States during the calendar year 1929?

2. What proportion of such imports were made by Canadian packing companies, or others than Canadian packing companies?

3. Have such imports of American hog products been graded, stamped, or labelled, to enable the Canadian consumer to judge as to quality and country of origin?

4. What was the customs valuation per pound on American hog products mentioned above, for the year 1929?

5. What was the average wholesale price at Montreal and Toronto, on similar products for the year 1929?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PORK AND PORK PRODUCTS-IMPORTATIONS
Permalink
LIB

Mr. RINFRET: (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

1. Canada's imports of baoon and ham, fresh pork and pork in brine from the United States, oalendar year 1929 were:

Pounds

Bacon and hams, shoulders and

sides, cured 6,853,104

Pork, fresh, chilled or frozen.. 1,007,490 Pork, barrelled, in brine 11,759,811

2. No information available.

3. No.

4. Canada's average import value per pound on United States hog products imported, calendar year 1929, was:

Per pound cents

Bacon and hams, shoulders and

sides, cured 14.2

Pork, fresh, chilled or frozen... 15.8 Pork, barrelled in brine 11-3

Note: The above figures represent the

average fair market value or the price thereof per pound of certain hog products when sold for consumption in the principal markets of the United States whence and at the time when the same were exported direiotly to Canada.

5. Average wholesale price of certain hog products at Montreal and Toronto, calendar year 1929, was:

Montreal Toronto per per

Pound Pound

cents cents

Bacon, smoked light, 6-8

pounds 31.9 28.4

Ham, smoked light, 12-16

pounds

29.3 29.2Shop hogs, (90-110)

20.2 20.2Mess pork

20.2 20.4

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PORK AND PORK PRODUCTS-IMPORTATIONS
Permalink

PICTOU ISLAND CABLE

March 19, 1930