June 8, 1929

COMMITTEE ON STANDING ORDERS


Mr. ROBERT McKENZIE (Assiniboia, for Mr. Morin, St. Hyacinthe) presented the ninth report of the select standing committee on standing orders. He moved that the report be concurred in.


LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I am informed that this

report contains a request for the remission of money. When money has been paid to the officers of the house and the bill is not proceeded with or is not in order, that money automatically reverts to the Receiver General and can be refunded only by the Minister of Finance bringing in an estimate to that effect. Therefore, I think this motion should stand.

Motion stands.

Topic:   COMMITTEE ON STANDING ORDERS
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YUKON MAIL CONTRACT


On the orders of the day:


CON

George Black

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GEORGE BLACK (Yukon):

Mr. Speaker, as there probably will not be time to have a question answered1 in the regular way, I would ask the Postmaster General to state how many tenders have been received for the Yukon mail contract, the names of those who have tendered, the amount of each tender, and the successful tenderer.

Topic:   YUKON MAIL CONTRACT
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LIB

Peter John Veniot (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. P. J. VENIOT (Postmaster General):

Mr. Speaker, the bon. member for Yukon (Mr. Black) consulted with me before deciding to ask this question, and I have an answer prepared. Nine tenders have been received, as follows:

Gorst Air Transport Limited-$750 per round trip carrying 1,000 pounds of mail each way with at least 50 round trips per season, $37,-500.-And any trips in excess of 50 will he carried for $650 per trip (round), 1,000 pounds.

The department asked that tenders be submitted for the carrying of 62,000 pounds of mail. This tender would amount to $45,300 for 62,000 pounds. The following tenders were for the full tonnage of mail:

Thomas Cecil Richards Whitehorse, $44,000. P. Martin and J. R. Alguire, $45,000.

John L. McLennan, A. Dubois and E. E. Hickey, $49,750. .

J. E. Greenfield and J. E. Pickering (Greenfield and Pickering) Whitehorse, $56,000. Christian Gloslie, $56,900.

George Camden Smith, Whitehorse, Yukon; $57 250.

Greenfield and Pickering, Whitehorse, (J. E. Greenfield and J. E. PickeTing), $60,000. Robert Lowe, Whitehorse, $60,000.

Those are the nine tenders. The question was to whom the contract would be awarded.

The contract was awarded to the lowest tenderer, namely, Thomas Cecil Richards, Whitehorse, $44,000.

For the information of the house I may say that since they brought uip the question of carrying increased poundage, I have looked into the matter and it appears that a certain quantity of second-class matter accumulates during the winter time at Dawson or Whitehorse and is not transferred to the Yukon until some time in the spring or summer. I am endeavouring to make arrangements with the man who has been awarded this contract under the general call, to have that extra accumulated mail taken over at certain periods as it accumulates, perhaps once a month, and, if possible, twice a month. If that cannot be done in the regular way by the trail, we will endeavour to have it done by aeroplane so that when the spring arrives there will be very little, if any, accumulated mail for that section of the country.

The question has been raised of having that mail service carried out by aeroplane. I have not accepted that suggestion for the reason that if we accept the proposition of transporting mail to the Yukon entirely by aeroplane, we shall be taking away from the people of the Yukon the assistance they are now getting through a mail contract, of keeping the trail open in the winter .time. By this system of transportation of the mail we aid that territory by keeping open the winter trail, and I thought it in the interests of the people there, while permitting a certain amount to be carried by aeroplane, to continue the old system of getting the mail through in order to assist those people by keeping the trail open during the winter.

Topic:   YUKON MAIL CONTRACT
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DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT AMENDMENT

CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved the second reading of and concurrence in amendments made by the Senate to Bill No. 313, to amend the Dominion Elections Act. He said: The hon. member for Quebec South (Mr. Power), the chairman of the committee, will, I think, be in a better position than I am to explain the amendments to the house.


LIB

Charles Gavan Power

Liberal

Mr. C. G. POWER (Quebec South):

There are a few amendments which are really corrections of typographical errors which have crept into the printed copy. One amendment of a very serious nature is the following. The clause reads:

Dominion Elections Act

Any appointment made by the chief electoral officer may be made by reference to the title of office of the appointee.

The Senate in their revising capacity have thought well to make it read:

By reference to the title of the office.

There is some discussion amongst authorities learned in the law as to whether or not we should say a man has the title of office or the title of the office. In view, however, of the importance of the legislation, I would not suggest to the house that we appoint managers to consult with the Senate as to whether this matter was seriously discussed with them. The other amendments are not of any consequence and I suggest that the house accept them.

Topic:   DOMINION ELECTIONS ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN SENATE AMENDMENTS
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Motion agreed to, amendments read the second time and concurred in.


DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL REVENUE


The house in committee of supply, Mr. Johnston in the chair. National Revenue-salaries and contingencies, $795,840.


UFA

Henry Elvins Spencer

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. SPENCER:

Yesterday we had a good deal of discussion with regard to clearance papers for vessels carrying liquor to the United States. If the government carried out the expressed wishes of this parliament in 1926 and refused clearance papers to such vessels, what difference would it make to the revenue of this country? If clearance papers were refused, would it cost a great deal, and if so, how much, in the minister's estimation, for any increased force that would have to be engaged to do this work?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL REVENUE
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LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Hon. W. D. EULER (Minister of National Revenue):

I am not sure -that I can give anything like an accurate estimate of the amount of revenue that would be lost if clearances were discontinued. It might not be very great. The committee, of course, understands that all excise is paid on liquor when it leaves the distilleries. The collections last year of liquor cleared for the United States amounted to $12,421,000. If those clearances were discontinued, I do not think it would at all follow that a large amount of liquor would not go to the United States, and whether it entered the United States by way of clearance or without a clearance, that liquor, if it came from Canadian distilleries, would still have paid us revenue, but it would not then appear under the heading of clearances to the United States, because clearances would

not be granted. It would appear, no doubt, as domestic consumption. The liquor would be purchased, I suppose, from the government stores in Ontario or from the liquor commission in Quebec. It might be exported and yet it would not appear under clearances to the United States, so that we could not calculate what amount would be lost. It would all depend upon how much the exportation to the United States would foe reduced by the discontinuance of clearances.

The other question, I understand, was how much it would cost

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL REVENUE
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UFA

Henry Elvins Spencer

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. SPENCER:

For an extra force to try to prevent people from breaking the law with regard to importing liquor into the United States.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL REVENUE
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LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

I cannot say definitely. I have heard it estimated at anywhere from $1,000,000 upward a year. It would depend upon the size of the preventive force you would require to establish. You might have to put boats on the lakes in order to watch vessels going out illegally without clearances.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL REVENUE
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UFA

Edward Joseph Garland

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. GARLAND (Bow River):

Will the minister give the house the increase in the preventive service in the last three years?

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL REVENUE
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LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. ELTLER:

In the land forces in 1927,

there were 142 employees, and in 1928, 342. It was in 1928 that the chief reorganization took place. Last year there were 318 employees, a slight reduction, as compared) with the previous year. The personnel of the shipping crews amounted in 1927 to 283; 1928, 649; 1929, 644. To the latter should be added 48 men for two new vessels now building, one of which I understand will soon be in commission. The number of employees on cruisers and patrol boats in 1927 was 16, and in 1928, 39.

Topic:   DEPARTMENT OF NATIONAL REVENUE
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June 8, 1929