June 4, 1929

BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE


FIRST AND SECOND READINGS OF PRIVATE! BILLS


LIB-PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Liberal Progressive

Mr. J. L. BROWN (Lisgar):

I beg to move:

That for the remainder of the session all private hills from the senate when received from that house be read a first and second time and referred forthwith, and that standing order 105 respecting the posting of hills be suspended in reference thereto.

Mr. ,T. S. WOODSWORTH Winnipeg North Centre): Mr. Speaker, this is only one means of evading what is a distinct responsibility of this house, and I take most decided objection to setting aside the rule in this case.

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UFA

William Irvine

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. WILLIAM IRVINE (Wetaskiwin):

I understand the hon. member to be giving aotice of motion, Mr. Speaker, and that to move the motion now requires unanimous

consent.

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LIB

John Frederick Johnston (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

Mr. DEPUTY SPEAKER:

Under the rules, as no notice was given of this motion, unanimous consent is required before the motion can be put. The motion will have to stand.

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LIB-PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Liberal Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

Then may I ask that the

motion serve as a notice of motion?

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?

Charles Stephen Booth

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

Then it goes in

with the regular motions?

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LIB
?

Charles Stephen Booth

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

It goes in with the rejcul ir notices of motion?

31S6

Post Office Signs

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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

No. It goes in with the routine motions. It has to do with procedure only.

Motion stands.

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POST OFFICE SIGNS

LIB

Peter John Veniot (Postmaster General)

Liberal

Hon. P. J. VENIOT (Postmaster General):

The hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett) inquired on the orders of the day on Friday last whether or not the^e was any accuracy in the report that the enamelled post office signs that were formerly printed in blue on a white ground had been withdrawn and signs with red letters on a white ground substituted therefor. In reply to his inquiry, I wish to give the following details:

The enamel post office signs printed in blue on white background are still in use on about 11,000 post offices, and will continue to be issued to all post offices except those situated on main highways.

In 1923 the Post Office Department introduced a red enamel sign with the words "Post Office" and the name of the post office in white letters thereon, for use only on post office buildings situated on main highways only. Applications to tender on 731 of these signs were issued to eight firms and only three of these firms submitted quotations, namely, The W. F. Vilas Company, Cowansville, Quebec; the Thomas Davidson Manufacturing Company, M'Ontreal, Quebec; and the Mc-Ofaty Manufacturing Company, Montreal, Quebec.

As the tender from the W. F. Vilas Company, Cowansville, was the lowest received, the contract was awarded to that firm. This sign, which shows the words "Post Office" and the name of the post- office serves a twofold purpose:

(1) It designates a post office.

(2) It gives the name of the place, thus

assisting tourists. ,

Since the introduction of the sign in 1923, numerous requests ha,ve been received for the extension of its use, but the department has confined the issue to post offices situated on main traffic highways only; therefore, the blue lettered white enamel sign bearing only the words "Post Office" is still being issued to all offices not situated on main tourist traffic highways. There is no contract pending for the purchase of additional signs.

Yesterday in conversation with the leader of the opposition I promised that I would have the tenders produced. The staff is now busy copying them, and I will hand them to my hon. friend as soon as they are ready, if that is satisfactory.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Quite so.

{Mr. Woodsworth.]

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PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READINGS-SENATE BILLS


Bill No. 337, for the relief of Edward Ernest True.-Mr. Garland (Carleton). Bill No. 338, for the relief of Glennville Wesley Potter.-Mr. Ladner (for Mr. Boys). ' Bill No. 339, for the relief of Elizabeth Mitchell.-Mr. Ladner (for Mr. Boys). Bill No. 340, for the relief of Edith May Enfield.-Mr. Donnelly (for Mr. Howden). Bill No. 341, for the relief of Lillian Elizabeth Barton.-Mr. Ladner (for Mr. Boys). EIGHT HOUR DAY On the orders of the day:


LAB

Herbert Bealey Adshead

Labour

Mr. H. B. ADSHEAD (East Calgary):

I

should like to ask the. Minister of Labour (Mr. Heenan) what progress, if any, has been made in connection with legislation for an eight hour day.

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LIB

Peter Heenan (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. PETER HEENAN (Minister of Labour):

The matter is still under consideration.

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CANADA'S FINANCIAL POSITION


On the orders of the day:


June 4, 1929