May 31, 1929

INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS COMMITTEE


Mr. CAMERON R. McINTOSH (North Battleford) presented the. third report of the select standing commitee on industrial and international relations, as follows: The select standing committee on industrial and international relations beg leave to present the following as its third report. Your committee has had under consideration a resolution which was adopted by the House of Commons on February 13, 1929, as follows:- That the question of granting family allowances should be studied, taking into consideration the respective jurisdiction of both federal and provincial parliaments in the matter, and that the said question should be referred to the Committee on Industrial and International Relations, with instructions to inquire into and make report. The following witnesses appeared before your committee to give evidence:- Rev. Father Leon Lebel, S.J., teacher of philosophy, LTmmaculee Conception, Montreal,



Mr. Gerald E. Brown, Assistant Deputy Minister of Labour, Ottawa, Ont.; Mr. Joseph Daoust, shoe manufacturer, Montreal, P.Q.; and Miss Charlotte Whitton, of Ottawa; Mrs. Mildred Densit, of Montreal; and Mr. Robert E. Mills, of Toronto; representing the Social Service Council of Canada. Your committee begs to submit the evidence of these witnesses on the subject matter of investigation, and recommends that (a) as this proposal is new in Canada, and requires more careful consideration, no immediate action shall be taken; and ' (b) that before the next session of parliament the question of jurisdiction in matters of this nature as between the Dominion and the provinces be considered by the government; (c) that 500 copies in English and 500 copies in French of this report and evidence be printed in blue book form, and that standing order No. 64 be suspended in relation thereto.


MARINE AND FISHERIES COMMITTEE


Mr. WILLIAM DUFF (Antigonish-Guys-borough) presented the second, third and fourth reports of the select standing committee on marine and fisheries, as follows: The select standing committee on marine and fisheries beg leave to present the following as their second report: Your committee, to whom was referred for their consideration, the convention for the protection, preservation and extension of the sockeye salmon fisheries in the Fraser river system, which was signed at Washington on the 27th clay of March, 1929, on behalf of His Majesty for the Dominion of Canada, by the plenipotentiary named therein, have taken the said convention under consideration and bog leave to recommend that the house do approve of the same. The select standing committee on marine and fisheries beg leave to present the following as their third report: Your committee have had under consideration Bill No. 26, an Act to amend the Fisheries Act. and have agreed to report the said bill with amendments. _ A'our committee has ordered that the said bill be reprinted as amended. The select standing committee on marine and fisheries beg leave to present the following as their fourth report: Following the consideration of Bill No. 26, an Act to amend the Fisheries Act, and in view of amendments made by your committee to said bill, your committee beg leave to recommend the adoption of the following departmental regulations in respect to the lobster and smelt fishing seasons: That the lobster fishing seasons as now established by order in council be as follows: 1. Charlotte county, N.B., November 15-June 8. 2. St. John county, N.B. November 15- May 23. 3. Remainder of Bay of Fundy to Burns Point Digby country January 15-June 29. 4. Burns Point to Herring Point, Lunenburg county, March 1-May 31. 4. (a) Herring Point to Cole Harbour, Halifax county, December 1-December 30; March 1-May 15. The late Mr. Lanctot



5. Cole Harbour to Red Point, Richmond county, including strait of Canso, May l-Junc 30. 6. Red Point to Cape St. Lawrence, Inverness county, May 16-July 15. 7. Cape St. Lawrence to south side river St. Lawrence, except Magdalen islands, and a portion of Northumberland strait, May 1-June 30 8. Portion of Northumberland strait from river Philip, Nova Scotia to Chockfish river New Brunswick, and Victoria harbour to West-point, Prince Edward Island, August 16 to October 15. 9. Magdalen islands, May 10-July 20. 10. North shore, Gulf of St. Lawrence, May 20-July 31. That the smelt fishing seasons as now established by order in council be as follows: In Nova Scotia; For gill nets, October 15 to the last day of February following, except in a portion of Richmond county, where it is October 1 to January 31. For bags nets, November 25 to the last day of February following, except in Northport and Tidnish rivers, where it is November 1-January 15. In Prince Edward Island; For gill nets, October 15-February 15. For bag nets, November 25-February 15. In New Brunswick: For gill nets, October 15-February 15. For bag nets, November 25-February 15, except in Baie Verte and Port Elgin rivers, it is November 1-January 15. In Quebec: For gill nets, September 1-February 15. For bag nets, November 25-February 15. For drag seines, September 1 to close of navigation. Your committee also recommend the adoption of the recommendations of the sub committee appointed to report on clause 5 of Bill No. 26, as amended: That, in place of section 5 of the said bill, which was stricken out as amended in committee, the minister be asked to regulate the number and use of trawlers under chapter 73, clause 46, R.S.C., by issuing to said beam trawlers a license to operate, and that regulations may be made by the Governor in Council prescribing the form of license, the evidence to be furnished on the application for the license, the number of licenses at any one time, the conditions under which same will be issued, and any other provision respecting same; That all said trawlers so licensed be owned and registered in Canada; That no beam or otter trawler be permitted to fish within twelve miles of the headlands of the Canadian coast; and That the department use every effort to encourage line fishermen, both inshore and offshore, to increase the production of fish to meet any increased demand.


THE LATE MR. ROCH LANCTOT

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, hon. members of this house learned yesterday afternoon, I am sure with sorrow, of the death at his home at St. Constant, Quebec, of Mr. Roch Lanctot, member for Laprairie-Napier-ville. Mr. Lanctot had been in ill health for [Mr Duff.]

some time past; indeed, he was unable to be present at all during this session of parliament and was absent during the latter part of the last session. His death therefore, was not unexpected. At the same time, I am sure it will bring a feeling of sadness to the hearts of all present to realize that we shall not again see within this chamber or about the corridors of parliament, his familiar figure.

Mr. Lanctot was in his sixty-fourth year. In years of representation in parliament he was one of the oldest members. He came into the House of Commons after the general elections of 1904 and was again returned in the elections of 1908, 1911, 1917, 1921, 1925 and 1926, a continuous service, as a member of parliament, of some twenty-five years. During the whole of that time Mr. Lanctot was very faithful in the discharge of his duties as a member, in attendance upon the sittings and work of the house and in representing in parliament the interests of his constituents and, in particular, the interests of the agricultural classes with which he was specially identified. It was characteristic of his concern for ,the people and their welfare that, in addition to being a member of parliament he should have continued to interest himself in municipal affairs. He was, 'at the time of his death, mayor of the parish in which he lived.

Mr. Lanctot was a true son of the soil. He was born in the country; he came to Ottawa for his early education, but thereafter returned to the farm and devoted himself to rural pursuits. He was not only a son of the soil but a lover of the soil and was true to the soil. Had he lived in France he would have been spoken of as a peasant proprietor; had he lived in Great Britain he would have been referred to as one of the yeomen of the country, the class of men who in both these lands are the backbone of the nation, and who are known throughout the world as the salt of the earth. In Canada he brought to the rural life of our country what was best in the rural life of these older countries, with which through blood or birth he was associated. A true representation of the type of man of which Mr. Lanctot was an outstanding example is given, it seems to me, by Gray, in his Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard:

Some village Hampden, that, with dauntless breast,

The little tyrant of his fields withstood,

Some mute inglorious Milton here may rest,

Some Cromwell guiltless of his country's blood.

The late Mr. Lanctot

Mr. Lanctot had many of .the characteristics of a Hampden. He was a man of sturdy independence and of sterling integrity; one who would not submit to arbitrary measures; who was fearless and courageous; prepared to stand alone for a principle in which he believed. He had many of the qualities of a Milton. He possessed a deep religious conviction, a strong faith. He was a lover of nature and there was about him, in his love of the simple and beautiful things of life, in his broad human sympathies and great friendliness of heart, not a little of the poet and the philosopher. He had, too, many of the attributes of a Cromwell. He was one who had a hatred of caste and of class; he was a great believer in the commonwealth, the commonweal, and at all times and on all occasions he stood for the rights of the people. This is the man who has passed away from our midst.

Speaking more particularly of the party to which he belonged, may I say that we had in him one of the firmest of upholders of Liberal principles. He was an intimate friend and strong supporter of Sir Wilfrid Laurier during the time that Sir Wilfrid was the leader of the Liberal party. In the ten years that it has been my privilege to be in the leadership of the party, he accorded to me a like friendship and an equally loyal support. Personally I feel his death very deeply. I am sure that feeling is shared in equal measure by all who sit on this side of the house, and I believe it is felt in great measure by all members of parliament, irrespective of party.

May I ask you, Mr. Speaker, to convey to his widow the sympathy of this house in her great bereavement. The 'house I am sure will feel sympathy for the constituency as well, the constituency which has lost a member who has represented it continuously and faithfully for so long a period of time. Perhaps nothing more worthy could be expressed of his name and his fame than to say he was as much respected and beloved by members in this house of parliament as he was honoured by the constituency which over a quarter of a century gave him an unbroken confidence.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, may I, on behalf of those who are associated with me to your left as well as on my own, express my great sympathy with the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) and his party in the loss they have sustained by the death of a beloved colleague? Mr. Lanctot possessed those qualities that endeared him greatly to those with whom he was associated, and I can

readily understand the reason for the moving sentences with which the Prime Minister expressed the sense of the loss sustained by him and his party in the passing of Mr. Lanctot. It was my privilege to know Mr. Lanctot for many years. I did not know him nearly so intimately as the Prime Minister and his colleagues did, but I knew enough of him to realize something of his sturdy character, sterling qualities and the devotion he gave to the service of his country. It may wel be said that he was desirous at all times of adding to his store of knowledge. Perhaps some members of the house will recall a speech that he made on one occasion in which he indicated that he came here a young man desirous of learning and that he had learned much by his experience in this house.

He was a very devout man and a son of his church in the true sense. I think from a brief conversation I had with him that he would describe himself as a Canadian with all that it involves-a son of the soil who loved his native province with a devotion that was sometimes touching, one who loved the soil as only perhaps a Canadian can who is proud of his country, proud of its achievements, and looks forward to its future with great hope.

He was a man of real integrity of character, and his views were not easily disturbed once he had arrived at a conclusion. While my hon. friend the Prime Minister described him as a very strong supporter of his party, I am bound to say that in the discussions that I have had with him, not less than in some of his public utterances, there was a strong indication that while his views were generally in accord with those of the Prime Minister, he held very conservative principles and I think most of those who knew him well will agree that that was so.

I am glad to associate myself with the Prime Minister in the sympathy that he has expressed for Mr. Lanctot's family, who have lost a loving and devoted husband and a father whose memory will be cherished with pride and satisfaction. He has rendered service to his country. His character and his achievements will serve as an example to those who come after him in the community in which he lived. His love of his country was manifested in every possible way in which it could be done within the sphere of his influence. The quotation which the Prime Minister has made from the poet Gray I would supplement with this other stanza:

No farther seek his merits to disclose,

Or draw his frailties from their dread abode,

(There they alike in trembling hope repose,)

The bosom of his Father and his God.

Business o] the House

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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. ROBERT GARDINER (Acadia):

Mr. Speaker, it was with regret that we heard of the death of Mr. Lanctot late yesterday afternoon. Mr. Lanctot was for many years a very very faithful member of this house and I am sure that he served his constituency well. We in this corner of the house desire to associate ourselves with the remarks of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) and the leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett) in paying tribute to the memory of the late Mr. Lanctot, and we also wish to express our sympathy to his widow and his family.

Miss AGNES C. MACPHAIL (Southeast Grey): May I be allowed to voice my deep

appreciation of the work of Mr. Lanctot, of his very attractive qualities and of his sterling worth? He had a charming personality. He had two things in common. He had a deep love of the people who live on the land and till the soil, and he was extremely interested in the peace of the world. With me he believed that if we continued to train our boys and girls in military methods, we would continue to use military methods. For all of these reasons I want personally to associate myself with the three members who have spoken in appreciation of the work which Mr. Lanctot did for the coming generations in this country.

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BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE


king's BIRTHDAY-SATURDAY SITTINGS


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

The motion on the order

paper with respect to Saturday sittings in order to be moved at this time will require the unanimous consent of the house. Before asking for that, may I say that in now presenting the motion I am doing so with a view to hearing hon. members express their views and feelings on the wisdom of sitting to-morrow. I recognize that we have had a pretty hoit week so far as the temperature is concerned, and a good many I imagine are feeling its fatigue and exhaustion, none more so than the members of the administration. However, we are quite prepared to sit to-morrow and continue with the work of the house with a view to hastening the termination of the session if such appears to be the wish of hon. members.

May I say in regard to sitting on Monday that last year, as I recollect it, the house sat on the King's birthday but adjourned during the afternoon in order that hon. members might attend the garden party given by Their Excellencies in honour of His Majesty's birthday. We had thought of following a similar

procedure this year but again, if Mr. Speaker would permit it, I would like to have an expression of the views of the house and the government -will seek to be guided in its final decision in the matter by what appears to be the general view.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I will put the motion. It is moved by the Prime Minister:

That on Saturday, the first day of June, 1929, and every Saturday thereafter until the end of the session, the house shall meet at eleven o'clock in the forenoon and the order of business and procedure shall be the same as on Fridays.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

It is undoubted, Mr. Speaker,

that the notice of motion now given by the Prime Minister has only become necessary because it was found that the first motion was not sufficiently 'broad to cover the matter, for it was originally intended to deal with to-morrow as well as every succeeding Saturday until the house prorogued.

I think we are all desirous of doing our best to expedite the business of parliament. We certainly should not sit for three sittings to-morrow. Whether or not we should sit until six o'clock to-morrow is a matter in respect to which those who sit to the left of the Speaker are entirely in the hands of the majority of the house. If the majority of the house so desire, we certainly are willing to expedite business by sitting.

With respect to Monday, I think the course suggested by the Prime Minister is one that might well be followed. We can have a sitting in the morning, adjourn for the afternoon, and sit in the evening from eight until eleven. I see no reason why that should not be done, and those associated with me are quite willing to assist in carrying out that idea.

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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. ROBERT GARDINER (Acadia):

So far as the sittings on Monday are concerned, it is agreeable to us to sit in the morning and in the evening, as the Prime Minister and the leader of the opposition suggest, leaving the afternoon free for those who desire to attend the garden party. But to sitting on Saturdays we have very strong objection. We have been having three sittings every day all week, and we have other business in our offices that we must attend .to, and with three sittings a day we have not very much opportunity to take care of that business that our constituents expect us to take care of. Saturday is the only day we have left in which to do that business.

I want to draw the attention of the house to a very important point. The members from the maritimes and we from the west.

Mixing of Wheat

have to sit here week in and week out. We cannot go home on Friday night and come back on Monday night like most of the members from Ontario and Quebec. It is the practice of this house not to transact important business on Friday or Monday; no important votes are ever taken on a Friday or a Monday. The consequence is that we who have to sit here all week can only mill around, if I may use that expression, until the other members come back. We get tired of this kind of business. We do not think it is fair. Then when we come to the end of the session there is a great rush, against which we have always protested. As far as we are concerned we will not consent to sitting on any Saturday during the rest of this session. I understand that this motion is not in order, Mr. Speaker, inasmuch as it was not placed on the order paper in time. Therefore I raise objection against the passing of the motion.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

If objection is raised, I

must declare that it is valid, because the motion is out of order unless there is unanimous consent.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

It is understood then that the house will sit on Monday morning and adjourn on Monday afternoon. I therefore move that this motion be withdrawn with the consent of the house.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Resuming again at eight o'clock on Monday?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes,

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May 31, 1929