April 18, 1929

REPORTS OF COMMITTEES


First report of the joint committee on the printing of parliament.-Mr. Marcil. Second report of the select standing committee on standing orders.-Mr. Morin (St. Hyacinthe).


THE LATE HON. J. W. EDWARDS


Right Hon. WT. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister): Mr. Speaker, it is seldom that this House of Commons has witnessed a more sudden passing of one of its members than that which has taken from our midst the Honourable Dr. J. W. Edwards, member for Frontenac-Addington. Not twenty-four hours ago, honourable members on all sides of the house were glad to have the opportunity of expressing their pleasure at Dr. Edwards' return to his accustomed seat in this chamber, after an absence of but a day or two, occasioned by what at the time was regarded by many as a severe though not serious indisposition. It is now but too evident that Dr. Edwards must have known, even on Monday last, that his days were numbered. In the circumstances his coming back into the house yesterday afternoon was but one more example of great personal courage and of a sense of public duty which were characteristic o>f the whole of his public life. That the House of Commons has been deeply touched by the death of one who has had a long association with its affairs, was apparent this morning when, despite the lack of opportunity of having public intimation made of the funeral service which was held in the forenoon, most of the members of this house, and, I venture to say, all who were aware of the service, were present in person to pay their last tribute of respect to his memory. That tribute, and the one which was paid by his fellow-members yesterday, is much more real and adequate than anything which it would be possible to express in words. At the same time, I may, perhaps, be permitted, speaking more particularly for those of us who sit on this side of the house, to say how much we, in common with hon. members opposite, feel the loss which our country has sustained in the death of one who, though still in his sixty-fourth year, had had a long career of public service, in the course of 1674 . COMMONS The late Hon. J. W. Edwards which recognition of his abilities found expression in his appointment as a minister of the crown. As one who was a graduate in arts and medicine of one of our leading Canadian universities, and who 'had followed the profession of teaching as well as that of a physician, Dr. Edwards with his native ability was well qualified to take an important part in the public life of this country. That those who knew him best were of this view is evidenced by his return to parliament in 1911, 1917, and 1925 and 1926, and by his appointment as a minister of the crown in 1921, to which I have just referred. We who were his fellow members in the House of Commons also shared that knowledge. I confess that those of us who sat immediately opposite to our late friend felt, at times, that some of his criticisms and censures were unduly severe ; that they proceeded from a sincere motive and from an undaunted courage, none of us doubted. There was, however, another side to the doctor's nature which was apparent to us all, and by which I am sure he would most wish to be remembered; it was his wide knowledge of public affairs, his ability and fearlessness as a public speaker, and, above all else, a great faithfulness in the discharge of his public duties as a member of parliament. While his loss to the commons will be great, it will be particularly felt by hon. gentlemen opposite, and I detsire, on behalf of the members of the government to extend to my hon. friend, the leader of the opposition and to those who sit about him, our sincerest sympathy in the loss which he and the Conservative party have sustained in the passing of one of its foremost members. There is one other expression of sympathy which I know all hon. members will wish to have made at this time, and which perhaps you, Mr. Speaker, will be kind enough to convey, and that is a mesage of profound sympathy to Mrs. Edwards and to her son and daughters in their overwhelming bereavement. I am sure few things we have witnessed have touched any of us more than the constant devotion, one to the other, of Dr. and Mrs. Edwards. Through all the storm and stress of his political life she was an ever faithful companion. I can see them now as they walked together toward these parliament buildings but a day or two ago, and I shall always recall the kindly smile which greeted me as we passed. (Mr. Mackenzie King.] It was that greater mellowness which came with years and which helped to reveal in increasing measure a keen sense of humour and a genuine kindliness of heart that won for Dr. Edwards the place which he had in the esteem and regard of members of this house. It will be remembered more and more as we leave behind the harsher aspects of the conflicts of party debate which, after all, are but of the day.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, the very touching tribute which the right hon. the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) has paid to our fellow' member is greatly apreciated by those who sit to your left. Doctor Edwards was our colleague, and perhaps we who were more intimately associated with him better understood his nature and appreciated his merits, but the observations of the Prime Minister leave no room for doubt that in this house he had made the influence of his personality strongly felt, and as the yeaTs passed, his true wTorth was but the better recognized. We mourn Doctor Edwards as one of the stalwarts of our party, one whose exposition of the principles of the party with which he was associated was at all times given with conviction, with earnestness and sincerity, and for that reason our grief is more than mere passing sorrow.

While we have lost a great party leader and might say with one of old, "A Mighty Prince has this day fallen in Israel," the loss to his constituents and to his country must not be under-estimated. No constituency was more loyally or more faithfully served by the member representing it in this house than the constituency represented by Doctor Edwards. His profession enabled him to have a very singular hold upon the affections of his constituents, for every medical man who is a member of the house realizes that he has a great advantage in being able to speak to bis constituents in terms denied to many others of us. That Doctor Edwards was greatly beloved by those he represented many of us have reason to know, for we have seen manifestations of their affection in more ways than one.

While the loss to our party and to his constituents is great, I feel that the loss to this Dominion is greater still. I know of no man who had a greater love and affection for his country and a more real devotion to its well-being than Doctor Edwards. He had a firm faith and a profound conviction that

The late Hon. J. W. Edwards

this country was destined to play a very great part, among the peoples of the world. He yielded to no man in his confident faith and belief that our true destiny was to be found within the empire of which he was so devoted a servant, and at all times, whatever might be the matter engaging his attention, he made reference to that fact.

I think you will agree with me, sir, when I say that in losing Doctor Edwards we have lost a great member of parliament. I cannot recall of whom that observation was made, but certain it is that it was made with respect to one who about two centuries ago played a great part in the parliamentary history of England. Doctor Edwards was a great House of Commons man. He believed in our

traditions. He had faith in representative government; he 'believed in the institutions of parliament, and respected and revered them. He had regard for forms, not for form's sake, but because he believed as most of us do, that in the maintenance of those forms we have the best guarantee for the preservation of the institution which we call parliament.

Then there was that side of his life which was so little known to many of us until we knew him more intimately-he was a great friend. His loyalty to his party was known to all, but his devotion to his friends was little understood. He was honoured by thousands of his fellow-Canadians by being placed in a position of very great authority in a powerful organization in this country, and yet I recall his saying to me that no man could point to a single observation that he had ever made in which he attacked any man's religion or denied to any one of his fellow-citizens the right to worship his own God under his own vine and fig tree. He had that tolerance which sometimes was denied to him. He had it to a singular degree. His love for his friends was very strong, and in this House of Commons, though sometimes his courage and the strength of his convictions found expression in terms that some of our friends took exception to, yet upon analysis, stripped of the surroundings under which the words were uttered, I think few could find cause for complaint or for just criticism.

We have indeed lost a friend, loyal, devoted and faithful friend, one whose service to his country cannot be measured by the accumulation of material possessions, but who has left behind him by his example and by the magnificent addresses which he delivered from

the Atlantic to the Pacific a feeling of faith in his country, based upon a stalwart Cana-dianism, coupled with a firm belief in the destiny of our empire and of this Dominion. These things will not easily nor soon be forgotten and as the years pass on I am satisfied that the feeling which was manifested yesterday when he returned to this House will be recalled as indicating the true measure of esteem and regard in which he was held by his fellow members. I recall, as the Prime Minister has mentioned, the words he spoke to me in the hospital only two days ago, and his appreciation of the manifestation of interest in his well-being shown by those whom he regarded as his political opponents, their inquiries as to his health and the hopes they expressed for his ultimate recovery, touched him greatly. I feel certain that his coming back to this house yesterday was influenced largely by a desire to express to those who had been so kind and had taken such an interest in his well-being his appreciation of their interest in his recovery.

I can say nothing more except this, that we do sincerely appreciate the observations that have been made by the Prime Minister, and we grieve with the devoted wife and family in the loss they have sustained. I should like to join with what my right hon. friend the Prime Minister has said in that regard, for only the day before yesterday I saw sitting beside the doctor's bed his devoted wife. Such relations are indeed an inspiration to every man who sees in them the development of the best in family life which, after all, is the foundation and the strength of all the institutions of our country. Love of wife and family, devotion to the companion of his life and to his children, were strongly manifested in our deceased colleague. It might be said of him, that though dead he still liveth amongst us. While there may be acute differences about many matters, there can be no difference of opinion as to the sincerity of his motives, the singleness of his purpose, the probity of his conduct, the integrity of his character, his great love for home and wife and children, his generous affection for his constituents and kind-hearted regard for his fellow men, his devotion to his country, his love for his empire and respect for this house of which he was so long a member.

We will long mourn him as a faithful and devoted friend whose loyalty was beyond question, whose devotion was beyond cavil, and whose single purpose in life was to serve

The late Hon. J. W. Edwards

his country well and who loved his fellow-men to the fullness of his great heart. I am sure too that we had too little appreciation of the breadth of his vision, the greatness of his intellect, and the power that he wielded throughout this country for the wellbeing of the commonwealth. Perhaps the words of a great poet truly express our sentiment:

He has outsoared the shadow of our night;

Envy and calumny and hate and pain,

And that unrest which men miscall delight,

Can touch him not, and torture him again.

Topic:   THE LATE HON. J. W. EDWARDS
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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. ROBERT GARDINER (Acadia):

Mr. Speaker, when the house rose last evening at six o'clock we did not anticipate that we would 'be called upon to mourn the loss of one of its prominent members. When we saw Dr. Edwards in the chamber yesterdhy afternoon we all hoped that he had fully recovered from his indisposition of Monday, but unfortunately we are now called upon to mourn his death.

The late Dr. Edwards had taken a very prominent part in the public life of this country for many years past. He was a man of strong convictions, and he was not afraid to voice those convictions on all occasions, and he showed a fearlessness in debate which it would be well for most members of this house also to display.

He was a great humanitarian. Those who had an opportunity of knowing him only slightly became aware of the tremendous interest that he took in the inmates of our penitentiaries, and it was one of his life-long ambitions to see that the men and women who for the time being were restrained of their liberty should be given a better opportunity to become useful members of the community than had been accorded them in the past.

Primarily, on behalf of the prairie provinces, may I express our appreciation of the deep interest which the doctor took in our welfare. We have heard him many times in this house debate the question of the return of our natural resources, and he discussed it on many platforms. I am sure that the western people appreciate very fully the tremendous amount of labour which he expended on our behalf in order to see to it that the western provinces were placed on an equality with the other provinces of the Dominion. I am sure we all regret that he had not lived to see the fruition of his labours.

We in this corner of the house desire to be associated with the remarks of the Prime Minister and of the leader of the opposition in conveying to Mrs. Edwards and to the family our sincere regrets on this occasion.

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QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


CUSTOMS PROSECUTIONS IN PRINCE COUNTY, P.E.I.

CON

Mr. MACDONALD (Kings):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. How many cases for infringement of the Customs and Excise Acts were prosecuted in Prince County, Prince Edward Island, during the last fiscal year?

2. What are the names of the justices of the peace before whom such cases were heard?

3. How many convictions were procured?

i. In how many cases was an attorney employed by the department, and what are the names of the respective attorneys?

5. What remuneration was paid to each of such attorneys for services?

6. How many customs and excise officers have been employed in Prince County during the last year, and what are their names and respective salaries?

7. Was any payment made to said officers out of moneys received from the sale of seized liquors? If so, what amount and to whom?

8. How many appeals were taken to superior court, and what wrere the results of such appeals?

9. What attorney was employed by the department in prosecuting such appeals, and what amount was paid to such attorney for his services ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS PROSECUTIONS IN PRINCE COUNTY, P.E.I.
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LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of National Revenue)

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

Mr. Speaker, in order to give the information asked for in this question a great deal of time and labour would be required, as the records of the information desired are not kept according to counties. We could give the information for the whole province of Prince Edward Island. If the hon. member would be content with such information we would be glad to give it to him in the form of a return.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS PROSECUTIONS IN PRINCE COUNTY, P.E.I.
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Answered.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS PROSECUTIONS IN PRINCE COUNTY, P.E.I.
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WILFRED D. BOURGEOIS

CON

Mr. PRICE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. How many years' service did Wilfred D. Bourgeois have to his credit, as fishery-guardian, in Cocagne district. Kent county, New Brunswick, and also on fishery patrol boat Pontiac, on Northumberland straits?

2. Were his services satisfactory? If not, why was he permitted to continue?

3. Did he apply for appointment as fishery overseer for Kent county and did the Civil Service Commission recommend him?

4. What information was laid against him, if any, of what nature was the complaint and by whom was the information laid?

5. On what grounds was he rejected and upon whose recommendation?

6. Did Wilfred D. Bourgeois serve in France during the war?

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WILFRED D. BOURGEOIS
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LIB

Mr. CARDIN: (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

1. He was not employed on a yearly basis. He was engaged the following number of days in the following years:-

Days

1920- 21 May 24-Mar. 31 2651921- 22 Apr. 1-Mar. 31 2881922- 23 April 11 daysAug.-Nov. 65 "

761925- 26 Nov. 21-30

81926- 27 Aug. 13-Nov. 7

87

Engineer on C. L. " Pontiac "

1927- 28 Sept 1-Oct. 9 39

2. Though they were so regarded by the fishery overseer for the district, a commissioner who inquired into the efficiency with which he discharged his duties in 1921 and 1922 did not find that they were efficiently performed.

3. Yes.

4. The report of the commissioner referred to in No. 2, was on record. Also the member for the constituency stated that the appointment of Mr. Bourgeois would not inspire cooperation on the part of the fishermen and would not be in the best interest of the service.

5. The best interest of the service. Answered by No. 4.

6. It is understood he did. The man selected is also a returned soldier and was equally rated by the civil service examiners with Mr. Bourgeois for the position.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WILFRED D. BOURGEOIS
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WARDEN SHIP OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PENITENTIARY

CON

Mr. McQUARRIE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. When did the position of warden of the British Columbia penitentiary become vacant?

2. When did Inspector Jackson assume duty as acting warden?

3. Has the said Inspector Jackson while acting as warden been residing at night at the Georgia hotel or any other hotel in Vancouver?

4. What expenses have been incurred by the said Jackson since becoming acting warden?

5. Did the said Jackson make the investigation and report on which the late warden. Lt.-Col. Cooper, was asked for his resignation?

6. Was the warden's residence at the said penitentiary burned at night while the said Jackson was in charge of said penitentiary but at a time when the said Jackson was sleeping in the said Georgia hotel in Vancouver?

7. Was the said residence a total loss?

8. What was the value of same?

9. How did the fire originate?

10. W'as any insurance carried?

11. How many escapes have there been from the said penitentiary during tlie^ time the said Inspector Jackson has been acting warden ?

12. When did the position of deputy warden become vacant?

13. When was the Civil Service Commission

asked to fill the said vacancies? _

14. Will appointments be confined to residents of the province of British Columbia?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARDEN SHIP OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PENITENTIARY
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LIB

Mr. LAPOINTE: (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

1. February 17, 1928.

2. February 25, 1928.

3. Yes, Inspector Jackson resides at the Georgia hotel in Vancouver, at night.

4. Total expenses-five thousand four hundred and thirteen dollars, and fifty-five cents ($5,413.55).

5. Inspector Jackson made reports in connection with two investigations held into the management of the penitentiary at New Westminster by ex-Warden Cooper. Ex-warden Cooper was not asked for his resignation.

6. The Warden's residence at British Columbia penitentiary was discovered to be on fire at about two a.m. on February 7, 1929. Inspector Jackson was sleeping at the Georgia hotel, Vancouver, that evening. He was at the fire before it had assumed serious proportions.

7. Yes.

8. It is difficult to place a fair valuation on the warden's house. It was built early in the nineteenth century, and was for a time the residence of the governor of British Columbia when same was a crown colony. It was condemned many years ago on account of " dry rot." British Columbia newspaper accounts value it at about five thousand dollars ($5,000).

9. The fire is believed to be of incendiary origin.

10. No. The general policy of the government is not to insure any of its properties.

11. Inspector Jackson has not been deputy warden. During the time he has been in charge of the prison as acting warden, there has been one escape.

12. May 31, 1928.

13. The warden, 26th March, 1928: The

deputy warden, not yet.

14. No.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WARDEN SHIP OF BRITISH COLUMBIA PENITENTIARY
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RADIO COMMISSION

CON

Mr. CHURCH:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. When will the report of the radio commission be presented to parliament?

2. Will any legislation be introduced this session based on the recommenation thereof?

3. Will there be any change in the granting

of station licenses which expire the end of April ? _

4. What steps will the government take to eliminate the advertising nuisance which now exists ?

5. What regulations to protect the public will be afforded during the coming year?

6. Does the government propose to continue the present system on May 1st next, re the granting of those iicenses?

7. Have any complaints been received from radio fans about the advertising nuisance, and regarding what stations, and will the complaints be tabled?

8. What has been the cost of the radio commission, and what salaries, living allowances and travelling expenses have been paid each member of the commission and officials?

167S

Questions

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   RADIO COMMISSION
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April 18, 1929