March 21, 1929

ROYAL ASSENT

LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the house that I have received the following letter:

_. Ottawa, March 21, 1929.

Sir,

I have the honour to inform you that the Right Honourable Mr. Justice Duff, acting aa deputy of His Excellency the Governor General, will proceed to the Senate chamber this day at 5.45 p.m., for the purpose of giving the royal assent to certain bills.

I have the honour to be, Sir,

Your obedient servant,

James F. Crowdy,

Assistant Secretary to the Governor General.

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REPORT OF COMMITTEE


First report of the select standing committee on public accounts.-Mr. Casgrain (for Mr. Jacobs). Death of Marshal Foch


DEATH OF MARSHAL FOCH

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

Mr. Speaker, it is appropriate that at this time and in this place mention should be made of the sorrow with which Canada, in common with all parts t>f the British Empire, and in common with the nations which were allied and associated with France in the Great War, learned of the loss which the world has sustained in the death of Marshal Foch. It is unnecessary to review either the noble life of Marshal Foch or the incidents of his great career; they are known to all. Suffice it to say that never before in the history of mankind was the fate of so many nations entrusted so completely to the judgment of one man. That so great a trust was wisely reposed, is everywhere acknowledged. In expressing, therefore, to France our sympathy in her national bereavement, we give expression as well to a sense of world loss in which we also share.

It was my privilege, on the occasion of the visit of Marshal Foch to Canada in 1921, to extend to him, on behalf of the Canadian people, a welcome to the capital of our country. May I be pardoned if I venture to repeat to the house, from the report of what was then said, words with which I concluded my remarks, and which, if they possessed aught of appropriateness at the time, have an added significance in the existing circumstances of to-day. They are repeated in the belief that a word of just appreciation to the living is worth many eulogies upon the dead. Seeking to express the feelings of the Canadian people I said to Marshal Foch:

"It is, however, not alone because in the hour of supreme conflict in the world's greatest of wars, millions of warriors looked to you as their leader, or because a war swept world hails you to-day as a deliverer, that we most honour you. Rather is it that in your singleness of vision and humility of spirit we perceive the secret of all guiding genius worthy of the name.

Who is the happy Warrior? Who is he

That every man in arms should wish to he?

-It is the generous Spirit, . . .

Who, doomed to go in company with Pain,

And Fear, and Bloodshed, miserable train!

Turns his necessity to glorious gain; . . .

He labours good on good to fix, and owes

To virtue every triumph that he knows.

In Foch, the man, we discern the character of the happy Warrior. He who, whether amid adversity or triumph, loves mercy, seeks to do justly, and walks humbly with his God. To have had among us one who is truly great, a hero with a hero's soul, is to inspire within our country more of reverence for the source

of all true greatness. For this inspiration, which we shall ever hold in remembrance of this visit, we thank you, too, with all our hearts.

As Canadians, we honour your illustrious name; your immortal fame we shall ever cherish. May the light that never faileth lead you on!"

That prayer, Mr. Speaker, would appear to have been answered. We are told in the press despatches that among the last requests of the great soldier was that he might be moved into the sunlight. That wish has been fulfilled, not with the aid of his physician, but by the hand of the Creator.

May I add, Mr. Speaker, that the government has given instructions that the flag which flies over these parliament buildings shall be flown at half mast during the time of the funeral of Marshal Foch, as a mark of national respect to the memory of this great and good man.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, we who sit to

your left desire to associate ourselves with the very moving observations that have been made by the right hon. the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), for we realize that in the passing of Marshal Foch there has departed from this world one of its very greatest citizens. He was great not only as a military genius, not only because in a moment of great peril, when he was entrusted with grave responsibilities, he discharged them in a manner wholly satisfactory to those who had reposed their confidence in him, but he was great because of the possession of those qualities which one of our own great writers has referred to as the earmarks of true greatness. He was a man of great humility, with a high sense of duty, a fine regard for his obligations to his fellow-men, and above all, with a true respect of his obligations to his Creator. We are told that at moments of the direst stress and strain, when the fortune of armies hung in the balance, it was his custom to repair to a little chapel and there to offer his devotion through Mother Church to his Creator. For one possessed of such power and occupying such a high and responsible position, to be mindful at moments of great crisis of his obligations to his God was characteristic of this great soldier and truly great man.

We do indeed grieve and sympathize with France in the death of her greatest soldier, one whom we have reason to regard not only with the highest esteem, but more, with almost affection because in a great crisis of the war it was to the Canadians he turned

Death of Marshal Foch

as the spear head of his attack, realizing that in their valour, in their bravery and their courage, he had the instrument best suited to accomplish the purpose which he had in mind. That in itself was a wonderful tribute paid by a great soldier to the valour and courage of our Canadian soldiers.

We grieve to-day with practically the whole world. It is an odd circumstance but it is a fact that the deceased marshal had never heard a gun fired in anger, until after the Great war broke out. Until then he had had no military experience in the field. He had been simply a student of war, and his two military textbooks are perhaps the two greatest books on war that the world has seen, for he applied to modern conditions the science of Napoleon, and in so doing made victory possible.

I remember having heard in England that a number of soldiers were regretting that Field Marshal Earl Roberts was not acquainted with the German language, and was therefore unable to appreciate the great works that had been produced by some of the masters of war in the German empire. But Earl Roberts remarked that he did not think it essential that he should be thus qualified because there was a colonel on the staff college of France whose works he did understand, and who he believed in the event of there being a great war within a limited number of years must be the man in whom the armies of many nations would repose their confidence. The foresight that characterized the view of Earl Roberts at that time was amply justified by the result.

The affection in which the late Marshal Foch was held in Great Britain is evidenced by the fact that our sovereign conferred upon him the Order of Merit, and indeed Foch was a Field Marshal of the British army at the time of his death. No greater honour could have been conferred upon a man who was not a British subject than was conferred upon Marshal Foch by the sovereign of the British Empire.

It is fitting that we in this parliament of Canada, the oldest and the greatest of the overseas dominions, should associate ourselves with the citizens of the great republic where he was bom and of which he was such a distinguished citizen, associate ourselves also with the motherland and the other overseas dominions and with the other nations who were associated and allied with us in the Great war, in their grief at the passing of one whose, genius, whose foresight, whose steady nerve, whose devotion to duty, whose calmness in the great moments of the war

[Mr. Bennett.}

enabled him to snatch victory where defeat seemed imminent, and made the path of duty the path of glory, as was said by one of our own great poets when speaking of Nelson. And so to-day we associate ourselves with the right hon. the Prime Minister in the tribute that he has paid to this great figure which has just been removed from amongst us. We grieve with his native land, but we rejoice that a soul so great has passed to his eternal home.

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PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. JOHN EVANS (Rosetown):

Mr. Speaker, we in this part of the house wish to associate ourselves with the sentiments that have been expressed by the right hon. the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) and the hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett) in their tribute on the death of a world hero. In Marshal Foch the world had a hero, not one of the foolhardy kind, but one whose courage was born of faith and of the guidance sought from the One in whose hands the destiny of all nations lies. Being a man of faith, he was also true to duty. He came forth at a time when the allies needed somebody in whom they could place their trust. Marshal Foch was a patriot of the first order, not one that sought glory particularly for himself or even for the French nation, for he had the cause of humanity at heart.

In considering the life of Marshal Foch let Canada to-day, with her two races, learn the lesson of cooperation, as our parent nations did in the time of their anguish when they made common cause in the task of winning the war. The name of Foch will go down in history, not particularly as that of a French patriot but as one who made humanity's cause his own. It is at times like this that the significance of all our actions and the eternal bearing which they have is brought home to us. Perhaps we can do nothing better now than to look back over the years leading up to the war, and in a national way do some real heart-searching and thus strive to find out if we can whether we were, either personally or nationally, in any way responsible for that great struggle which took away so much of the cream of humanity. To-day we mourn the death of a great and a good man.

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LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES MARCIL (Bonaventure) (Translation):

Mr. Speaker, I trust the house will allow me-being one of its oldest members-*to thank, on behalf of the Frenchspeaking people of Canada, the right bon. Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King), and the distinguished leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett), for the so well deserved tribute paid

Grading of Grain-Mr. Campbell

to the great field-marshal Foch. If the citizens of English origin in this country manifest both admiration and veneration for the memory of this distinguished man and illustrious soldier, such admiration and veneration are doubly felt by those in whose veins flow the same blood as that which flowed in the veins of Ferdinand Foch.

We, of French ancestry, have always sought the "entente cordiale" between Great Britain and our former motherland. We most anxiously hoped for this entente, under Edward VII-the great arbitrator of peace in Europe-and we finally realized it with the great world war of 1914. We were doubly honoured on that Sunday morning in December, 1921, when Ferdinand Foch visited Ottawa to officially thank the Canadian people for its participation in the war. He had then gloriously crowned his victory, and had what is more the very great satisfaction of having prevented further carnage the moment that honour had been vindicated.

The hon. leader of the opposition has just told us that Field-Marshal Foch was mindful of his obligations to his God, and that, in the midst of the greatest battles, it was his custom to repair to a little countryside chapel and there invoke the aid of his Creator. He gave us a beautiful example of piety, that Sunday morning in December, 1921, when in leaving the railway station, he drove to the Basilica to hear holy mass, kneeling in the choir beside His Grace the Archbishop of Ottawa. He performed this religious duty previous to receiving the welcome tendered to him by the people. We have a vivid recollection of his visit to the University of Ottawa, the seat of French culture, and furthermore he duly paid his respects to the representative of our Sovereign in Canada.

No more need be said. I think it was but proper that a French voice be heard in this house so as to thank those wh'o paid tribute to the great departed soldier. What we are saying to-day will be re-echoed in France, in Paris. Even at present, the government of the French Republic is making arrangements to pay the late Field Marshal Foch the supreme honours paid to her great men, to those who have well served their country.

I wish to thank the leaders of the three parties-since there are three parties in the house-for their participation in this display of sincere friendship and bonne entente we have shown to-day, by paying tribute to the great generalissimo who has just passed away.

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GRADING OF GRAIN

WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE


The house resumed from Wednesday, March 20, consideration of the motion of Mr. Kay for concurrence in the third report of the select standing committee on agriculture and colonization.


PRO

Milton Neil Campbell

Progressive

Mr. M. N. CAMPBELL (Mackenzie):

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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LIB

James Malcolm (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mir. MALCOLM:

Mr. Speaker, I want to ask the hon. gentleman a question. He has made a charge-

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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PRO

Milton Neil Campbell

Progressive

Mr. CAMPBELL:

I have only a few moments at my disposal.

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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LIB

James Malcolm (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MALCOLM:

I think, Mr. Speaker will give the hon. gentleman extra time. He has stated that in his opinion the Department of Trade and Commerce has failed to administer the grain act. I want him to substantiate that charge with some evidence.

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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PRO

Milton Neil Campbell

Progressive

Mr. CAMPBELL:

Mr. Speaker, it is unnecessary for me to go over again the facts that I placed before the house yesterday and the facts that were adduced by the hon. member for Bow River (Mr. Garland). Surely those facts prove that the grain act has not been properly administered.

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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LIB

James Malcolm (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MALCOLM:

The hon. member for Bow River stated yesterday that his criticism was directed against the judgment of the Board of Grain Commissioners. He quoted a telegram addressed by me to the board, and he distinctly stated that he heartily agreed with the opinion therein expressed.

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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PRO

Milton Neil Campbell

Progressive

Mr. CAMPBELL:

Mr. Speaker, I read the very same telegram yesterday afternoon. Surely the minister will admit that the Board of Grain Commissioners are a part of his department; therefore their failure properly to administer the grain act is a failure on the part of the department. He cannot possibly separate the responsibility of the Board of Grain Commissioners from the responsibility of his department.

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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LIB

James Malcolm (Minister of Trade and Commerce)

Liberal

Mr. MALCOLM:

Mr. Speaker, if the hon. gentleman admits that the moment the question referred to was called to the attention of the minister, the minister wired the commission his opinion, which is satisfactory to the hon. member, bow can he argue that my department failed in carrying out the act?

Topic:   GRADING OF GRAIN
Subtopic:   WHEAT-INSPECTION, SHIPMENT AND PROTEIN CONTENT-REFERENCE TO COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
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March 21, 1929