February 15, 1929

UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. GARDINER:

It is possible, when there is a change of ministers, that the new minister will not utilize the private secretary of the former minister. I know of such a case at the present time, and I would like to know if the former private secretary would be in a position to secure a position in the civil service.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

There is nothing in the

act to prevent any minister using the private secretary of a former minister. Where a minister retired for some personal reason it is quite likely that the incoming minister would use the services of the private secretary. However, I think my hon. friend will agree that when there was a change in government it would' not be fair to ask the minister, of another party, to use the secretary who had served under a former government.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. GARDINER:

I recall a case where a

minister of the present government retired and the secretary was not kept on by the next minister. I want to find out if this legislation would be pertinent to that particular case. If it is merely to cover the present and future private secretaries, I am quite content.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

I think it is only fair to

let the incoming minister be the judge in such matters.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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CON

James Dew Chaplin

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CHAPLIN:

I would suggest that the

minister answer the question asked him.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

Taking my own case, there was a very excellent man in the department but he could not act as my private secretary because he did not understand French. I hope my hon. friend has enough confidence in the stability of the present ministry to feel sure there will be no sequence to this bill for a great number of years.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. GARDINER:

I am afraid the minister does not understand my question. I am quite content with this legislation if it is only to be applicable to present or future private secretaries, and I asked the minister to state whether that individual, who is not now a private secretary, would be eligible under the statute for a position in the civil service.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

It does not apply to former private secretaries, but only to secretaries acting as such at the present time.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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UFA

Robert Gardiner

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. GARDINER:

That is all I wish to

know about that. I would like the minister to tell the committee what salary a private secretary would receive when he would go back into the service as a chief clerk.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

The average salary for a private secretary at the present time is $4,080, which includes the last flat increase which was given two years ago. The position of chief clerk, which is proposed in this bill, would pay a salary ranging from $3,120 minimum to $3,720 maximum. This follows out approxi-

Military Pernion Act

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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Section agreed to.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I desire to express, on

behalf of that person who will hereafter occupy this office, my very sincere appreciation of the minister's explanation. I had not heard of this provision until I saw it in the bill, but I think it is a very fitting recognition of the duties that may be rendered by some person as private secretary to whomever may occupy this position. I say this in justice to my hon. friend's usual courtesy and fair-mindedness in this regard.

Bill reported, read the third time and passed.

Topic:   CIVIL SERVICE ACT AMENDMENT
Subtopic:   PERMANENT APPOINTMENT OF PRIVATE SECRETARIES
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WAR REPARATIONS PAYMENT OF $2,500,000 TO CUSTODIAN


Hon. FERNAND RINFRET (Secretary of State) moved that the house go into committee to consider the following proposed resolution: That the Minister of Finance be authorized to place to the credit of the custodian, out of the reparation money paid into the treasury for losses sustained during the late war, a sum not exceeding $2,500,000 and that .provision he made as to the method and scale of payments.


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I understand

it is the wish of hon. gentlemen opposite not to go on with this resolution to-day, but to take it up some time next week.

Topic:   WAR REPARATIONS PAYMENT OF $2,500,000 TO CUSTODIAN
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

If you please.

Motion stands.

Topic:   WAR REPARATIONS PAYMENT OF $2,500,000 TO CUSTODIAN
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MILITARY PENSION ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. J. L. RALSTON (Minister of National Defence) moved that the house go into com-rpittee to consider the following proposed resolution: That it is expedient to amend the Militia Pension Act in respect to the computation of the amount of pension payable to officers retired compulsorily or seconded, to be based upon the average annual amount of pay and allowances during the three years immediately preceding retirement, and to amend the procedure for computing the pension for an officer who has served as a member or associate member of the defence council for a period of not less than three continuous years.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Explain.

Topic:   MILITARY PENSION ACT AMENDMENT
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LIB

James Layton Ralston (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Mr. RALSTON:

The object of the bill

which will be founded upon this resolution is as set out in the resolution. The first part

introduces a principle which will change the existing order so far as the pensions of officers are concerned. As hon. gentlemen know, the provisions of the Superannuation Act are that civil service pensions shall be based on the average of the salary for the last three years of service. This same principle applies to the pension payable to non-commissioned officers and men, but for some time the pension payable to officers has been based on the amount they receive at the time of their retirement. This permits a situation whereby pressure may be brought to bear to increase the salary just before an officer retires, in order that the pension might be increased. It is sought to bring the pension payable to officers under the same principles as apply to civil servants, noncommissioned officers and men.

I do not think the second part of the resolution is a very important matter. The members of the defence council are generally staff officers or senior officers who are appointed under the regulations for four years. These positions are generally regarded as the highest which can be attained in the service. At the end of the four-year period, or whatever extension there is, they have to go back to some position which pays a lower salary, with the result that the amount of their prospective pension is cut down. The proposal is to allow those officers who have attained sufficient seniority and efficiency in the service to take positions as members or associate members of the defence council, to have their pensions, when they retire, based on the average of the three years' salary received by them as members of the defence council.

Topic:   MILITARY PENSION ACT AMENDMENT
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February 15, 1929