June 6, 1928

SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR 1928-9


A message from His Excellency the Governor General, transmitting supplementary estimates for the year ending March 31, 1929, was presented by Hon. J. A. Robb (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the house, and referred to the committee of supply.


REPORT OF COMMITTEE


Second report of the joint committee on printing of parliament-Mr. Denis (Joliette, for Mr. Marcil).


GRADING AND INSPECTION OF WHEAT

REPORT OF COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE AND COLONIZATION


Hon. J. E SINCL.AIR (Queens, for Mr. Kay) presented the ninth report of the select standing committee on agriculture and colonization, as follows: The select standing committee on agriculture and colonization begs leave to submit/ its ninth report as follows: , Your committee have had under consideration a resolution and order of reference dated February 16, 1928, whereby it was resolved: That whereas the protein content is an important factor in the value of wheat, "Therefore be it resolved that in the opinion of this house, the National _ Council of Industrial and Scientific Research in conjunction with the Board of Grain Commissioners be asked to investigate and report on the feasibility of utilizing the protein content of wheat as a basic factor in the grading of that product. And further be it resolved that this resolution be referred to the committee on agriculture and colonization for consideration and for such suggestions in connection with the grading and inspection of wheat as it deems advisable to pass on to the said national council and Board of Grain Commissioners." Grading oj Wheat-Report of Committee Pursuant to the said resolution and order of reference, your committee has agreed to the following conclusions, which it has passed on to the said national council and the Board of Grain Commissioners, viz: 1. From a price standpoint baking strength is an important element in wheat, and in the Canada Grain Act definitions of our higher grades, baking strength is determined by two factors-variety and percentage of hard red vitreous kernels. 2. In the resolution submitted to your committee it is proposed to amend the Grain Act so as to determine baking strength by the two factors-variety and quantity of protein-the latter to be determined by a chemical test and to be expressed in percentages. 3. In Canada, Great Britain, the United States and probably most other countries that consume Canadian wheat, baking strength is an important factor in determining its value; by strength is meant the quantity and quality of protein. 4. Except in the case of durum wheat, which at present is graded in a class by itself, and possibly one or two other varieties that are grown in relatively small quantities, the protein in the contract grades can be assumed to be of good quality. 5. All things considered, the amount of gluten, that is, of protein, seems, in the light of present day knowledge to be the nearest approach to an ideal index of baking strength available. 6. The cost of making the protein tests would range from 50 cents to 75 cents, and is not considered a serious difficulty notwithstanding the fact that laboratories would necessarily have to be installed at all inspection points. We would suggest that data be obtained as to cost of installing and maintaining laboratories. 7. The time required to make an individual test would be from one and a half hours to two _ hours. However, as daylight is not required for laboratory testing, and as a large number of tests may be conducted simultaneously, under sufficient organization operating 24 hours a day, no difficulty would be encountered in testing of cars and no delay in despatching cars to terminal points may be anticipated. 8. The definite proposal contained in the resolution could be put into effect in so far as car-lot shipments are concerned, but your committee is not yet satisfied that wheat sold locally in wagon-loads could take advantage of this scheme. A practice in vogue among members of the Kansas wheat pool whereby the farmer and elevator man forwarded samples jointly to the laboratories would seem to point the way to a solution of the difficulty concerning street wheat and this system should be investigated. 9. The introduction of protein as a factor in wheat grading would be an incentive to grow the best milling varieties of wheat. This we consider of great importance. 10. According to Mr. L. H. Newman, Dominion cerealist, Ottawa, and in the opinion of this committee, the following varieties are classed as desirable:-Early Red Fife. Marquis, Ruby, Red Bobs, Selections, Renfrew, Kitchener, Garnet and Reward. 11. It is highly desirable that the cereal division of the federal Department of Agriculture, and the several provincial governments working jointly, continue in their efforts to zone Canada's wheat area with a view to advising as to the variety, or varieties, most likely to prove satisfactory in each case. 12. So far however, as our export trade is concerned, there was not sufficient evidence submitted to the committee relative to the effect of the proposed change in the basis of grading to warrant your committee recommending its adoption at present. However, your committee recommends that a full enquiry into this phase of the question be instituted. 13. Re: Garnet wheat-In so far as evidence would show we are of the opinion this wheat which has hitherto been excluded from No. 1 northern should be eligible for that grade. 14. Re: Complaints of Liverpool Corn Trade Association. Your committee believe that the complaint in the matter of No. 3 can be in some measure sustained, due principally to the inclusion in this grade of a large volume of improperly dried wheat. Respecting the complaints regarding the general lowering of the standard of respective grades other than No. 3, we find that the evidence does not bear out this complaint. Regarding the situation with respect to No. 3, we find that the Board of Grain Commissioners and the department are now fully alive to this situation. We recommend that steps be taken to prevent a continuation of this condition. ^ We recommend that the Department of Trade and Commerce and the Board of Grain Commissioners keep a careful check upon the quality of export wheat, and that samples of export shipments should regularly be secured and sent to the chief inspector and retained in his office for purpose of comparison; and also that the laboratory be required to make baking tests _ and report on samples of shipments regarding which complaint has been made. 15. The committee recommends: (a) temporary interchange of inspectors between the several inspection points in the western division. (b) Uniformity of standards of grades from year to year is most necessary and for the purpose of comparison standard samples should be preserved for at least five years. 16. In order that the high quality of our export wheat be maintained, and in order to discourage, as far as possible, the growth of undesirable varieties of wheat, we would urge that one or more seed warehouses be estab-lished^ for the purpose of collecting and distributing seed of approved varieties, and that an experimental flour mill of sufficient size be established in order that experimental work in milling and baking may be conducted on a scale that will give results in line with those obtained in commercial mills. The committee would suggest that the cost of construction and equipping these facilities may well be taken from surpluses of revenue over expenditures in the administration of the Grain Act and the revenue from terminal elevators overages in the western inspection division. 17. The committee recommends that the protein map prepared by Dr. Birchard, exhibited to the committee, be printed for distribution and that a similar map be prepared by the research laboratory for distribution as early as possible in each year. 18. This committee recommends that inspectors be appointed at all transfer points between the head of the lakes and the seaboard, whose duty it will be to prevent any mixing of wheat so that the quality and condition of grades as fixed by final inspection will be maintained. International Relations



19. Your committee recommends that the said National Research Council and the Board of Grain Commissioners report, as^ by the said resolution instructed, to the Minister of Trade and Commerce, and that the said report be made before the next session of parliament. A copy of the printed evidence taken by the committee, in respect to the foregoing subject, is appended hereto for the information of the house. All of which is respectfully submitted. W. F. Kay, Chairman.


FOREIGN CONSULS IN CANADA

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I desire to lay on the table certain correspondence with respect to the granting and withdrawal of exequaturs to consuls in Canada. This information was requested by the hon. member for Labelle (Mr. Bourassa).

Topic:   FOREIGN CONSULS IN CANADA
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INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS

CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE


Mr. C. R. MctINTOSH (North Battleford): I beg to move, seconded by Mr. Neill: That the fourth report of the select standing committee on industrial and international relations be concurred in.


CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. H. H. STEVENS:

There is just one word that I should like to say in regard to this report and to draw it to the attention of the Prime Minister and the government. I am not objecting to the main sentiment expressed in the report. I think the real intention of the report is simply to indicate that there is a problem and that it should be further studied. I gather from reading the whole report that was really what the committee had in mind, but in section 2 there is a very positive declaration:

That we accept and endorse the principle of unemployment insurance.

The point I am drawing to the attention of the Prime Minister is this. It is quite true that in the subsequent paragraph that declaration is qualified by pointing out that the matter is within provincial jurisdiction and there are one or two other qualifications. For instance, the committee indicate that there is an insufficiency of data to determine to what degree unemployment exists and the committee are also unable to make any estimate of the cost. Such qualifications follow the declaration, but in my opinion a declaration of this kind going out from parliament with its unanimous endorsation will convey to the public at large the impression that parliament has endorsed and consequently will be

bound to implement by legislation a definite unemployment insurance scheme. That I think would be misleading. It ought to be made clear that such a declaration by parliament at this time is limited by the obvious limitations indicated in the subsequent paragraphs.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I agree with my hon.

friend that if it were to 'be assumed that the report carries with it an obligation on the part of the government to implement by legislation any of its resolutions or expressions of view, it would not be advisable that the report should be endorsed by the house. The government regard the statement with respect to principle as purely and simply an expression of opinion and, having regard to other phases of the report not as one imposing any obligation on the federal administration.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Wininpeg North Centre):

I think anyone who has read the report will recognize that whilst certain limitations are expressed with regard to the immediate adoption of the principle, whilst according to the law officers of the crown the obligations primarily rest with the provinces and whilst we have not yet sufficient information to enable us to work out a scheme, there is also in the report the opinion of the law officers that it is quite possible for us in regard to unemployment insurance to follow the lines already adopted in regard to old age pensions. Therefore it seems to me that we are not going very far in adopting this report, when, after all, we are committed under the treaty of the League of Nations to put into legislation unemployment insurance. I think that principle of unemployment insurance was adopted by the Conservative party at their last convention at Winnipeg and I hope the hon. member for Vancouver Centre (Mr. Stevens) is not going back on the platform of his party. Then, may I suggest to the Prime Minister that if endorsing the report does not mean that we are going to implement it 'by legislation, we may as well kill the report to-day. We do not want to go on giving the public the impression that we are going to do something-forever expressing pious resolutions and then failing to implement them. Although I am tremendously in favour of getting something on the record with regard to unemployment insurance, if this report means simply another pious hope on the part of the government that something will at some time be done, let us to-day kill the resolution for concurrence and then the public will know where the government stands.

International Relations

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice):

Reading the report of the committee I find the following:

That the evidence of the Justice department makes it clear that the responsibility for such legislation rests on the provincial authorities, it being within their jurisdiction under the provisions of the British North America Act, but that it would be within the power of parliament to contribute, by grant, to such provinces as adopted such legislation, following the precedent set in the matter of technical education, highway construction, and, more recently, the Old Age Pension Act.

Then I find that section 7 states:

In order that this matter might be further dealt with, your committee recommends to parliament that at the next session this question be again referred to the committee on industrial and international relations.

I have no objection at all to adopting this recommendation. It is made clear that the matter is a provincial one. Of course the hon. member for Winnipeg North Centre is a little aggressive in these matters. He would like us to enact legislation which would not be within our jurisdiction.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

If the hon. member will permit me, it is also made clear by the report that it is quite competent for parliament to proceed along the lines followed in connection with old age pensions.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

To help; to make grants. That is why the committee has reported that the matter should be further dealt with at the next session of parliament.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

Quite so.

Topic:   INDUSTRIAL AND INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS
Subtopic:   CONCURRENCE IN REPORT OF COMMITTEE
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June 6, 1928