May 30, 1928


On the orders of the day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

As hon. members are

aware, the house will not sit on Monday of next week. My attention has been drawn to the fact that a number of hon. members will desire to leave the city early on Saturday afternoon or evening for the week end. Before the hon. leader of the opposition (Mr. Bennett) left for the west, I had a word with him with respect to having morning sittings begin next Saturday, and I understood the hon. gentleman was agreeable to that. I have just learned from my friend the acting leader of the opposition (Mr. Guthrie) that he understands .that will be satisfactory to the members of his party. If it is agreeable to hon. members generally, I should like to move the necessary motion at once, so that hon. members may arrange their plans accordingly; if ther.e is any desire to debate the motion, I would let it stand as a notice. If J;he house is agreeable, I move that we return to Notices of Motion.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink
LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

By leave of the house.

Motion agreed to and the house reverted to the order "Notices of Motion."

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING moved:

That on and after Saturday, the 2nd of June instant, until the end of the present session, the house shall meet at eleven o'clock in the morning of each day, except Sundays, and that in addition to the usual intermission at six o'clock p.m., there shall be also an intermission from one to three o'clock p.m.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink
CON

Hugh Guthrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Do I understand there is a sitting arranged for Saturday of this week?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes, Saturday morning.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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CON

Hugh Guthrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

And Saturday afternoon? Mr. MACKENZIE KING: Yes.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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IND

Joseph Henri Napoléon Bourassa

Independent

Mr. BOURASSA:

Does it mean that we

shall adjourn from one to three, or from one to two on Saturday?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

From one to

three.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
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CON

George Reginald Geary

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GEARY:

Does the house sit Saturday evening?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I think it may be understood that the house will not sit Saturday evening. We may adjourn early in the afternoon.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   MORNING SITTINGS
Permalink

Motion agreed to. Chicago Drainage Canal


APPLICATION OF DUMPING DUTY

BRITISH COLUMBIA STRAWBERRY CROP


On the orders of the day:


CON

William Kemble Esling

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. K. ESLING (West Kootenay):

Mr. Speaker, on Monday last the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King) stated that council would act on the advice of the Minister of National Revenue the very moment that the minister gave to council reasonable grounds for restricting importation-referring probably to natural products. Now, I am in receipt of a telegram from Preston stating that the 1928 strawberry crop to the value of 865,000 will be ready for the market in a few days, and that the growers will foe subject to serious loss if they are compelled to market this crop in competition with surplus berries from the United States. May I ask the Prime Minister if this will be considered a reasonable ground for passing an order in council to restrict the importation of surplus berries?

Topic:   APPLICATION OF DUMPING DUTY
Subtopic:   BRITISH COLUMBIA STRAWBERRY CROP
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING:

I may say to my hon. friend, Mr. Speaker, that while I might have one view of what is a reasonable ground, some of my colleagues might have another. I would not be able to say what view council as a whole would take until the matter comes before us there.

Topic:   APPLICATION OF DUMPING DUTY
Subtopic:   BRITISH COLUMBIA STRAWBERRY CROP
Permalink

STRUCTURAL STEEL WORKERS' STRIKE


On the orders of the day:


CON

Thomas Langton Church

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. T. L. CHURCH (Toronto Northwest):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to ask the Acting Minister of Labour (Mr. Elliott) what has been done or will be done to adjust the very serious strike of structural steel workers employed on an important public work in Toronto. A week ago the minister stated he would have a reply ready. What is the situation?

Topic:   STRUCTURAL STEEL WORKERS' STRIKE
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May 30, 1928