April 10, 1928

EXCHEQUER COURT ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 190, to amend the Exchequer Court Act. He said: This bill is offering some slight amendments on matters of procedure. For instance, there are now two judges of the exchequer court, the chief justice and a puisne judge, and this bill is for the purpose of making it clear that either the president of the court or the puisne judge may exercise the power which in many statutes is conferred upon a judge of the exchequer court. There is also a section of the act which provides that the practice and procedure in suits, actions and matters in the exchequer court shall be regulated by the practice and procedure in similar suits in His Majesty's high court of justice in England. That provision was made in 1877, and since then the practice and procedure in the high court of justice in England has been amended in many respects. This bill is for the purpose of having those same amendments apply to our exchequer court. The bill will also give to the judges of the court the right to make general rules and orders, instead of only the chief justice as formerly. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT


Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 191, to amend the Criminal Code. He said: This bill is for the purpose of reintroducing a bill which passed this house on three or four occasions but was rejected by the senate. It is for the purpose of repealing a clause which was inserted in the Criminal Code in the session of 1919 concerning unlawful associations, the printing of seditious books, and so forth. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


INTERPROVINCIAL AND INTERNATIONAL TRAFFIC IN INTOXICATING LIQUORS


Hon. ERNEST LAPOINTE (Minister of Justice) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 192, respecting interprovincial and international traffic in intoxicating liquors.



Geneva Slavery Convention He said: This bill provides that in any province where there is in force an act in virtue of which it is unlawful to sell or have in possession intoxicating liquors without authority or permit of the government of the province or of any board, commission or other governmental agency authorized to issue such permit or grant, it shall be unlawful to import liquors Otherwise than through the governmental agency, board or commission which has the control of the sale of liquor in the province. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


DOMINION FOREST RESERVES AND PARKS ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. CHARLES STEWART (Minister of the Interior) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 193, to amend the Dominion Forest Reserves and Parks Act. He said: The object of this amendment is merely to withdraw from the forest reserves in Manitoba and Saskatchewan certain areas which have been examined by our soil surveyors and have been approved of as fit for agricultural purposes. It is proposed to withdraw one quarter section of land from the Riding Mountain forest reserve in Manitoba, and in Saskatchewan, an area of 21 square miles from the Big River forest reserve; also 6.65 square miles from the Fort a la Come forest reserve; one-half section from the Pas-quia reserve; one half section from the Porcupine No. 2 reserve; one quarter section from the Pines reserve; 2.25 square miles from the Keppel reserve, and .63 of a square mile from the Nisbet reserve. All of these small withdrawals consist of lands which have been applied for and found suitable for settlement. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. CHARLES A. DUNNING (Minister of Railways and Canals) moved the first reading of Bill No. 194, to amend the Canadian National Railway Act. He said: The object of this bill is to bring the Canadian government railways more completely under the jurisdiction of the railway commission than is now the case. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


PRIVATE BILLS

FIRST READING-SENATE BILL


Bill No. 168, for the relief of Daisy Myrtle McPherson.-Mr. Pettit.


GENEVA SLAVERY CONVENTION


Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister) moved that the house go into committee to consider the following proposed resolution: That it is expedient that parliament do approve of the slavery convention signed at Geneva on the twenty-fifth of September, one thousand nine hundred and twenty-six, and which was signed, on behalf of Canada^ by the Canadian representative duly authorized to that effect; And that this house do approve of same. He said: Mr. Speaker, as the resolution indicates, this international convention was approved by the seventh assembly of the League of Nations. It was signed by the Right Hon. Sir George Foster, under authority of an order in council of Canada, passed on August 7th, 1926. The matter was fully discussed by the Assembly of the League of Nations, and Canada's representatives were present during the discussion. The convention contains twelve articles, which may be summarized as follows: The contracting parties undertake to prevent and to suppress the slave trade and to bring about the complete abolition of slavery in all its forms. For this purpose they shall give to one another all possible assistance and undertake to prevent compulsory or forced labour from developing into conditions analogous to slavery. Disputes arising from this convention, if not settled by direct negotiations, shall be referred to the Permanent Court of International Justice or to some other court of arbitration. Slavery is defined as being the status or condition of a person over whom any or all of the powers attaching to the right of ownership are exercised. The slave trade includes all acts involved in the capture, acquisition, or disposal of a person with intent to reduce him to slavery or with a view to selling or exchanging him and all acts of trade or transport in slaves. The convention will come into operation for each state on the date of the deposit of its ratification or of its accession. It is in order that the convention may be made applicable to Canada in this formal way that the present resolution is introduced.


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hen. R. B. BENNETT (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, I cannot but feel that it is idle to ask this house to give its

Harbour Commissions

ratification and approval of any measure unless that measure has been printed and in the hands of hon. members for a sufficient time to enable them to study its provisions. We should be something better than mere rubber stamps in a matter of this kind. While the right hon. Prime Minister's explanation makes it abundantly clear that this is a convention to which parliament can give its assent, the fact remains that we should not be asked blindly to approve of any treaty without having had an opportunity to consider its terms and fully understand all its implications. At a later time I shall certainly avail myself of an opportunity to say something with respect to the whole procedure which is followed by this country in regard to the League of Nations, but this is not the time or place to speak of it. However, I do suggest to the Prime Minister that these treaties should be printed and in the hands of hon. members before they are asked to give their approval.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I am sorry my hon. friend was unavoidably absent from the house before the Easter recess. Had he been present he would recall that at that time I did lay on the table copies of this convention both in English and French. Of course I agree entirely with my hon. friend that the house should have all documents before it in order to study their terms. The conventions have been printed for some time in the proceedings of the League of Nations, and, as I say, they were formally presented to the house in printed form before the Easter vacation.

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I am aware that the right hon.- gentleman laid them on the table at the time, but I think that is not sufficient to enable members to have full knowledge of their terms. The documents should be printed and in our possession before we can be in a position to express our views thereon.

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

They are

printed and distributed in both English and French.

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April 10, 1928