March 16, 1928

UFA

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. KENNEDY:

The minister read a few letters, and while I did not catch all they conveyed I understood that the communication from the Dominion Textile Company intimated that the reductions would not mean much to the consumer but did mean a good deal as between the various manufacturers using yarns.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

Not yarns, no. They claimed that they would lose $600,000 per annum of which about $64,000 would embrace yarns. The rest represented a loss in protection on their product.

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Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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UFA

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. KENNEDY:

We shall see in Hansard just what the letter says. Has the minister received a letter from the Wabasso Company

complaining about these changes?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

No.

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UFA

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. KENNEDY:

My objections yesterday were based largely on the added1 protection given the Wabasso Company. I also stressed the argument in regard to forties and finer which previously were on the free list and are now made dutiable in the rates the minister proposes. I believe they were to be 10 per cent under the intermediate and 15 per cent under the general.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

And free under the preference.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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UFA
LAB

Herbert Bealey Adshead

Labour

Mr. ADSHEAD:

As one who was a new

member last year and who was under what was perhaps a delusion, that the tariff was going to be taken out of politics and that the tariff advisory board would bring in something concrete and definite whereby we might arrive at some conclusion, I must say that I am disappointed in the work of that body. I have a great deal of sympathy with the minister in his attempt to do all over again the work which the board has done or ought to have done, and I have much more sympathy with myself and others who are trying to wade through the mass of evidence which has been taken and to do over again for ourselves what the tariff board should have done. Last year when the tariff board was under discussion I suggested that we should have a sort of Hansard of the board's proceedings. The hon. member for Weybum (Mr. Young) supported that suggestion-and he belongs to the party opposite. The Minister of Finance said that this could not be done, but he did promise that if any hon. member wished to have a copy of the evidence submitted regarding any particular item or application it should be available. A number of us applied for the evidence and we waited patiently in the expectation that between sessions we might study it so as to be able to come to some conclusion as to what should be done in relation to the tariff. One objection to the proposal I made was lack of money, and for that reason we could not get a satisfactory report of the work of the tariff board. It seems to me that the suggestion made by my hon. friend (Mr. Stevens) is a reasonable one, that at least a precis or synopsis of the proceedings of the board should be given to members of the house, even if we have not a statement of the board's conclusions. This, I think, is due the house, and I trust the minister will take the matter into serious consideration. Such a synopsis would enable us to consider the question intelligently, as we cannot do at present. I am sure I cannot now arrive at a very definite conclusion without wading

Ways and Means-Customs Tariff

through all this evidence, even after following the example of the Minister of Finance and sitting up until eleven o'clock at night for weeks as he sat up until two o'clock in the morning for months.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

Mr. Chairman, yesterday the

hon. gentleman opposed these items from two different angles. The item as submitted to parliament was what might be termed the fact finding of the board; it was their suggestion that this change should be made in the tariff, on the ground that these finer counts were a good deal more expensive to manufacture and that they should be placed in a position equal to that of the less expensive yams.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

Where are we to find that recommendation ?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

I am telling my hon. friend

now as a member of parliament, on my responsibility as a member. After having consulted officers of the department, that was the representation made to me. I passed that representation on to my colleagues and have their authority to present it to parliament.

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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

I am asking the question

because there is no record of it. I am not questioning my hon. friend's word at all.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

My hon. friend is quite right; there is nothing in print concerning it. There were some three 'hearings held in connection with this cotton inquiry, covering several weeks; witnesses from all sides came before the board, those who advocated higher protection as well as others. Hon. gentlemen must remember that the mills all asked for more protection; I think I make no mistake in saying that. If you look at the evidence you will see that most of the mills urged that they should have more protection. There were also those who thought they should not have more protection, and indeed representations were made that the protection already existing should be reduced. At the conclusion of that inquiry a statement was made by Mr. Daniels, whose letter I read in which he stated that his company will lose over $600,000 yearly largely through the reduction of the duty on the finished fabric. On November 22, Mr. Daniels made this statement, which may be found at page 964 of the evidence taken before the board at the November hearing:

I appreciate very much the way in which you have received our application, and the very fair-minded way in which your criticisms have been handed out. ... we will be very glad to let you have any information of any kind that will help you reach an equitable decision.

[Mr. Adshead.i

On that point we have every confidence in the board, and you can count on our whole-hearted support.

Hon. gentlemen yonder protest against this increased protection, but the rates under consideration are all reductions. The very rate we are now considering, item 522, is a reduction ; item 522a is a reduction also. After listening to my hon. friend the leader of the official opposition yesterday I saw the difficulty in connection with item 522b, and he more than any person else protested against this protection. When we reach that item I am going to move that this be made free under the British preference, so why are we delaying?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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CON

Hugh Guthrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Can the minister tell

me where the importation comes from?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

I am told that in the past

about one-third has come from Great Britain and under the proposed change it is reasonable to assume that most of it will come from the mother country.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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UFA

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. KENNEDY:

I have here the figures

of the importations of yams number 40 and finer, up to March 31, 1926, and I find that we imported in that year from the United Kingdom 789,393 pounds of this material, while from the United States in the same period of time we imported 1,942,456 pounds.

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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

That is nearly half.

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LIB

Pierre-Ernest Boivin

Liberal

Mr. BOIVIN:

What was the value in

dollars and cents?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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UFA

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. KENNEDY:

We will take the year 1922. In that year we imported from Great Britain 1,125,451 pounds of this material valued at $1,115,769, and from the United States 1,240,100 pounds valued at $1,266,305. From 1922 to 1926 there is a steady increase in the importation from the United States with a corresponding decrease from the United Kingdom.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

While my hon. friend is on his feet I would remind him that during that period they were all on the same basis, and now it is proposed to make it free under the British preference to give the business to the United Kingdom.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
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March 16, 1928