March 16, 1928

UFA

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. KENNEDY:

Would this explain the

situation? At page 176 of the Trade of Canada I find that the total imports of cotton products from the United Kingdom have been fairly steady from 1922 to 1926, amounting to over $300,000 annually. From the United States, which is the other large country of exports to Canada, our importations have dwindled from 1922 on, having fallen from $1,366,257 to a little over $500,000. It seems that where the imports are steady and competition keeps up, the rate is maintained under the British preference and lowered under the general, where the country from which we have been importing largely has been losing in business. There is a general tendency to balance things in that way.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

Item 732 under the old

schedule is of considerable interest. It concerns coated and sized cloth, when imported by manufacturers for use only in their own factories in manufacturing sensitized blue or black print cloth. The old rate was 10, 124 and 15 per cent. The new rates will be 224, 25 and 30.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

Imports, 10,000.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

What factories are making that in Canada now? What is the production in Canada?

1448 COMMONS

Ways and Means-Customs Tariff

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

I have not that information.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

The minister has presented a figure given him by his assistant.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

My hon. friend will admit that the rates are low enough.

Mr. STEVEN'S: Unquestionably this item is used by the wholesale manufacturers of clothing; it is a class of clothing very commonly made and considerably used, and there must be a large production of it. It is rather interesting to know what is produced in Canada if there is such a small amount imported.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

I will read the item, and then my hon. friend will understand. That kind of clothing would not be very good with the

weather twenty below zero:

Coated and sized cloth when imported by manufacturers for use only in their own factories in manufacturing sensitized blue or black print cloth.

That is for drafting purposes, I think,-the making of plans. I would not be surprised but that the importations represented by the $10,000 were used in making some of the plans for the new buildings we are putting up.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

Before we pass from this particular item I am going to make another appeal to the government to separate from it item 575a under the old schedule, covering cotton clothing. As I said before, this is a necessity to the working man, because khaki and blue duck all come under this heading. I do not see why we should place certain other kinds of cotton duck on the free list while the very kind used by the working man is under such a high duty. I would ask the minister to take item 575a out of that group and reduce it to say 5 per cent, 10 per cent and 15 per cent.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

That is the large item of importation; under that item we imported goods to the value of $1,531,008. The reduction is from 32i per cent to 25 per cent under the treaty rate and from 35 per cent to 30 per cent under the general rate.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. EVANS:

And an increase of 2^ per cent under the British preference.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

No, my hon. friend cannot get away with that; there is no increase.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
PRO

William Russell Fansher

Progressive

Mr. FANSHER (Lambton):

According to the figures given by the hon. member for Peace River, most of the goods imported come under the British preference, and in that there is no reduction. This seems to go to show that the tariff revision is made on ia protective basis,

or there would have been a reduction in the British preference, under which there is the largest importation.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

The hon. gentleman misquoted the figures; the large importation comes under the general tariff, and that is where we made the reduction.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
UFA

Donald MacBeth Kennedy

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. KENNEDY:

The point is that the importation from Great Britain is steady, while the importation from the United States has been decreasing for the last five years, although it is still large.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

This will give them a better chance to come in, then; is that the idea?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

John Anderson Fraser

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FRASER:

In the last two items why do you increase the tariff on hammocks and window shades? Under the British preference the increase is from 20 per cent to 22J per cent, while the rate under the intermediate and general tariff is decreased. Is not that in direct contradiction to the statement made this afternoon that you were increasing the British preference?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

No.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

John Anderson Fraser

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. FRASER:

That statement has been made repeatedly.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

Our policy is to increase the British preference on the large items, but this is a small and practically obsolete item.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1927, AMENDMENT
Permalink

March 16, 1928