February 16, 1928

SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO QUESTIONS CONCERNING RETURNED MEN AND DEPENDANTS

LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

A special committee was

appointed yesterday to consider problems affecting returned soldiers. The number comprising the committee was fixed at seventeen. Apparently seventeen is an infraction of the rule, which would limit the number to fifteen. 1 move, therefore:

That the provision of standing order No. 65, under which no special committee may, without leave of the house, consist of more than fifteen members, be suspended in connection with the resolution passed by this house on February 15, appointing the special committee on pensions and returned soldiers' problems.

Topic:   SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INQUIRE INTO QUESTIONS CONCERNING RETURNED MEN AND DEPENDANTS
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Motion agreed to.


CRIMINAL CODE AMENDMENT


Mr. E. R. E. CHEVRIER (Ottawa) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 45, to amend the criminal code (greyhound races). He said: The object of the bill is to amend the criminal code for the purpose of placing greyhound racing on the same basis as horse racing as now carried on in Canada. Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk).


BUTTER IMPORTATIONS

LIB

Mr. CAYLEY:

Liberal

1. From what countries is butter being imported into Canada?

2. How many pounds were received from each country ?

3. What was the increase of total imports of butter in 1927 over 1926?

4. What were Canadian and British prices of butter for 1927?

5. How many pounds of butter were exported out of Canada in 1925, 1926 and 1927, respectively ?

6. Can butter be produced more cheaply in countries exporting butter to Canada than in Canada? If so, why?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUTTER IMPORTATIONS
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

1, 2 and 3.

Quantity of Butter imported into Canada, by countries, years ended December 31, 1926 and 1927, with increase or decrease, 1927 compared with 1926.

Years ended December 31 Increase + Decrease-1926 1927 1927 compared with 1926Countries from which Imported Pounds Pounds PoundsUnited Kingdom 2,798,697 2,007,830 . - 790,867United States 99.127 104,236 + 5,10962.720 - 62,720Australia 2,995,740 376,096 - 2,619,6448 - 8448 - - 448Fiji 4,760 + 4,760Italy 9 4- 9Newfoundland 110 410 + 300New Zealand 3,193,382 8,714,985 + 5,521,603Syria 1.650 490 - 1,160Trinidad and Tobago 3 + 3Total imports 9,151,882 11,208,819 + 2,056,937

4.

Butter-wholesale prices at Montreal for 1927. (Quotations middle of Month)

1927 Cents per pound

January 43

February 42

March 46

April 39

May 38

June 36

July 36

August 38

September 41

October 42

November., 40

December 40

Privilege-Mr. Woodsworth

Butter-wholesale quotations London, England (Commercial Times) (Middle of Month).

1927 Argentine Dutch New Zealand Danish

Converted at Pai [DOT] to cents per pound

January ,. 30.8-34.7 39.9-40.3 32.1-39.9 37.7-38.1February .. 32.1-34.3 42.9-43.3 35.1-39.4 40.7-41.1March .. 30.8-33.0 37.7-38.1 32.6-35.6 38.6-39.0April ,. 31.3-33.9 38.1-38.6 31.7-35.6 38.6-39.0May .. 31.7-33.4 33.0-33.9 33.0-36.0 34.3-35.1June , . 32.1-35.6 33.4-34.3 33.4-37.7 34.7-35.1July .. 30.8-35.1 33.0-33.9 29.1-35.1 34.3-34.7August ,. 31.3-36.0 36.0-36.4 34.3-38.6 37.7-36.0September . . 37.7-38.1 40.7-41.1 36.0-40.3 41.1-41.6October . . 33.4-38.1 41.6-42.0 36.0-40.3 41.1-42.0November .. 33.9-37.7 43.3-43.7 34.7-40.7 44.6-45.0December ,. 31.3-35.1 42.1-41.1 32.1-34.7 39.0-5. Exports of Butter from Canada (Calendar Years, 1925, 1926 and 1927) 1925 1926 1927Pounds Pounds PoundsCanadian Produce. 26,646,535 9,814,000 2,696,000.Foreign Produce.. 840 800 2,100Total Exports. 26,647,375 9,814,800 2,698,100

6. In the case of New Zealand-probably yes. As to other countries-not in a position to express opinion.

Butter can probably be produced more cheaply in New Zealand than in Canada owing to the fact that lush pastures are available there for twelve months in the year, thus saving a great deal of work harvesting forage and quite possibly lowering production costs as compared with Canada.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BUTTER IMPORTATIONS
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COST OP CARRYING NEWSPAPERS

CON

Mr. GEARY:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What was the cost of carrying newspapers

by mail during each month from January 1, 1926, to date? .

2. What was the revenue derived from the [DOT]carrying by mail of newspapers during each month from January 1, 1926, to date?

3. On what date did the reduced rates -authorized by parliament in 1927 come into effect?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COST OP CARRYING NEWSPAPERS
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LIB

Mr. VENIOT: (Postmaster General)

Liberal

1. The cost of carrying newspapers is approximately $8,500,000 per annum.

2. 1926 1927

January $149,104 06

February . .. 125,22 1 42 146,227 09March .. 130,067 13 149,011 25April . .. 137,300 93 133,038 97May . .. 138,300 57 134,572 35June . .. 136,301 31 131,505 61July . .. 133,156 25 114,124 25August .. 134 .284 35 116,248 57September.. .. .. 138,322 94 118,358 47October . .. 149,872 61 127,114 %November.. .. .. 148,876 32 122,105 54December.. .. .. 156,868 92 131,510 89

3. 16th April, 1927.

PRIVILEGE-MR. WOODSWORTH On the orders of the day:

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COST OP CARRYING NEWSPAPERS
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Winnipeg North Centre):

I desire to direct attention to an entirely misleading, I may say, false, statement, with reference to what I said the other day during the debate on national banking, which is contained in the Toronto Evening Telegram of February 14 in what purports to be an account of the proceedings of that date, despatched by the special staff correspondent. I find that under the guise of a report a vicious attack on myself. Under the special heading " Rebellion Suggested " I read:

But his language grew stronger as he went along, and he pictured the whole of the national credit drifting into the hands of two or three men and then recorded his sad conviction that, "If anything would justify armed rebellion against the established condition of affairs, I think such conservation of the banking system is the one thing that would justify it."

Strange, isn't it, how these peaceful little chaps-most of them pacifists-are always ready to talk red rebellion. Makes you wonder, if said rebellion ever did come, whether they'd fight or raise wheat to feed the fighters.

All that I said in this connection will be found recorded in Hansard' at page 389.

Some hon. gentlemen may remember a rather remarkable statement made during the election of 1925 by Sir Clifford Sifton. He said:

"We are rapidly approaching that condition in which two or at most three banks will be doing the whole of the business of the Dominion and you will have the spectacle of about three men sitting on the whole of the funds of the people of Canada deposited in the banks and deciding to whom they will loan these funds." And again:

"If anything would justify an armed rebellion against the established condition of affairs I

Royal Architectural Institute

think such a consummation of our banking system is the one thing that would justify it."

An hon. Member: Sedition.

Mr. Woodsworth: Somebody suggests that

this is sedition. Well, such an utterance might be seditious in the mouths of some of my comrades in the working class, but I suppose it is comparatively safe for Sir Clifford Sifton tg make this statement.

I suggest that the members of this house ought in some way to be protected against misrepresentation of the proceedings of the house and of what is said by those who take part in them.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   COST OP CARRYING NEWSPAPERS
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ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE


On the orders of the day:


CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. J. W. EDWARDS (Frontenac-Addington):

May I call attention to an

article appearing in the Ottawa Evening Journal of yesterday?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Oh, oh.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EDWARDS (Frontenac):

I may say

for the information of my hon. friends opposite that this is not a comic journal. The article in question refers to a very important convention which is to be held in this city to-morrow and the next day, namely, that of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada, with representatives from coast to coast. I see in this article that the only person mentioned as representing the Department of Public Works is a gentleman holding a very minor position. This is an important convention and I should like to know from the Minister of Public Works (Mr. Elliott) whether his department will be represented by its chief architect or, if not by him, at least by some of its senior architects.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ROYAL ARCHITECTURAL INSTITUTE
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February 16, 1928