April 14, 1927

QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.) ^DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR-MEDIATION WORK


LIB

Joseph-Alexandre Mercier

Liberal

Mr. MEBCIER (Laurier-Outremont):

In how many disputes was the intervention of the Department of Labour sought and mediation work done,

1

(a) Under the provisions of the Conciliation Act, from 1900 to date?

(b) Under the provisions of the Railway Labour Disputes Act, from 1903 to date?

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LIB
LIB

*REPARATIONS COMMISSIONER-INTERIM REPORT

CON

Mr. CANTLEY:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is the so-called interim report of the reparations commissioner final in respect to the 1,497 awards mentioned therein?

2. Does the reparations commissioner agree with a statement made in the House of Commons that the so-called interim report was subject to revision in the final report on the 13 remaining claims?

3. Has the final report of the reparations commissioner on the 13 remaining claims been delivered to the Secretary of State or to his department?

4. Has the commissioner advised when the final or supplementary report will be ready?

5. Is the government aware of the fact that a great number of these claimants are in impoverished circumstances?

Questions

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Subtopic:   *REPARATIONS COMMISSIONER-INTERIM REPORT
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. RINFRET:

That was replied to on Monday.

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Subtopic:   *REPARATIONS COMMISSIONER-INTERIM REPORT
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Answered.

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Subtopic:   *REPARATIONS COMMISSIONER-INTERIM REPORT
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WALTER H. KIRCHNER

UFA

Mr. SPENCER:

United Farmers of Alberta

1. What reason was given by the Vancouver harbour commission for the dismissal of Walter H. Kirehner, accountant, Ballantyne pier, Vancouver, British Columbia?

2. Was he an efficient worker?

3. How long was he in the service of the Vancouver harbour commission?

4. Is he a war veteran?

5. Was his successor a returned soldier? _

6. What salary did the accountant preceding

Mr. Kirehner receive? _

7. What salary did Mr. Kirehner receive for performing similar duties?

8. What salary did Mr. Kirehner receive before asking for an investigation of his charge against the Vancouver harbour commission of exploiting the labour of non-political returned soldier employees?

9. What reason was given by the Vancouver harbour commission for temporarily withholding twenty-five dollars ($25) per month for eight (8) months from Mr. Kirchner's salary?

10. Have portions of salaries earned by other employees of the Vancouver harbour commission been similarly withheld?

11. Was any recompense made or suggested

to Mr. Kirehner by the Vancouver harbour commission for their action in withholding a portion of his salary for eight months? .

12. When Mr. Kirehner assumed the duties of accountant, Ballantyne pier, why was the title of "accountant" added to the employee performing the junior duties of cashier?

13. Did the cashier who was given the additional title of "accountant" perform any of the accounting duties of the Ballantyne pier?

14. Was the cashier of Ballantyne pier capable of performing the duties of accountant of the Ballantyne pier?

15. What is the title of the cashier of the Ballantyne pier to-day?

16. Was the salary of the cashier of the Ballantyne pier increased from one hundred and sixty dollars to one hundred and eighty dollars per month at the time he received the additional title of "accountant"?

17. Was the increase of twenty dollars per month given to the cashier as extra remuneration for supposedly performing accounting duties in addition to his duties of cashier?

18. Were the duties for which the cashier received additional remuneration performed by Mr. Kirehner?

19. What authority have the Vancouver habour commissioners to turn over portions of a salary earned by one employee to another?

20. Is the position of accountant senior to that of cashier in the Vancouver harbour commission?

21. Has it been the general practice of the Vancouver harbour commissioners for employees performing senior duties to come under the jurisdiction of men doing junior work?

22. Why were such conditions imposed upon Walter H. Kirehner?

23. Were such conditions imposed upon his predecessor or his successor?

24. On or about the 10th September was the comptroller of the Vancouver harbour

commission instructed by the commissioners to draw up a recommendation covering Mr. Kirchner's case, and what was that recommendation?

25. Was the recommendation by the comptroller minuted?

26. Has the government of Canada no jurisdiction over the actions of the Vancouver harbour commissioners against returned soldiers?

27. Did Walter H. Kirehner appeal to the Minister of Marine and Fisheries for justice?

28. Is the action of the late Vancouver harbour commissioners against Walter H. Kirehner endorsed by the government of Canada ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WALTER H. KIRCHNER
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UFA

Henry Elvins Spencer

United Farmers of Alberta

Mr. SPENCER:

As this will probably be

the last day of the session, I trust the answer to this question will be sent to me at my home address.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   WALTER H. KIRCHNER
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OTTAWA JOURNAL

CON

Hon. Mr. EDWARDS (Frontenac-Addington) :

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What amounts were paid to the paper now known as the Ottawa Journal, by the several departments of the government, during the calendar years 1911 to 1926?

2. What amounts have been paid to the Ottawa Journal by the government during the years 1911 to 1921, for space leased for government purposes in the Ottawa Journal building?

3. What was the floor space rate paid by the government to the Journal in the years mentioned, and what was the average floor space rate paid for the use of other privately owned buildings?

4. Is the government at present leasing any part of the Journal building, and, if so, what is the jmarly rental?

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Subtopic:   OTTAWA JOURNAL
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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret (Secretary of State of Canada)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. RINFRET:

Auditor General's Department:

1. The amount paid by this office, out of Legislation-Elections, to the Ottawa Journal during the calendar years 1911 to 1926 was $209.25.

2, 3 and 4. No information. Department of t'he Interior:

1. 1911.. .. $ 452 40

1912.. .. 1,175 00

1913.. .. 962 40

1914.. .. 1,260 80

1915.. ..

1916.. ..

1917.. ..

1918.. .. 345 96

1919.. ..

1920.. ..

1921.. ..

1922..

1923.. ..

1924.. ..

1925.. ..

1926.. ..

$8,121 69

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Questions

Department of Marine and Fisheries:

1. 1911.. .. Advertising Subscriptions $10 80

1912.. .. 10 80

1913.. .. 10 80

1914.. .. .. $63 00 10 80

1915.. .. 10 80

1916.. .. .. 5 00 30 72

1917.. .. 24 48

1918.. .. 24 48

1919.. .. 24 48

1920.. .. 24 48

1921.. .. 24 48

1922.. .. 24 48

1923.. .. 24 48

1924.. .. .. 10 60 24 48

1925.. .. 24 48

1926.. .. .. 55 60 24 48Total.. ., 134 20 $463 72 329 522, 3 and 4. No information.

Public Archives:

From 1917 to 1926 $218.16 for subscriptions to the Journal.

Department of Indian Affairs:

1. $146.40.

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Department of Justice:

1. For subscriptions $745.53.

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Department of Mines:

1. 1914-15 advertising in Greater Ottawa

Number, Journal Printing Co. $200. 1920-21

advertising Peat committee $56.70.

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Department of the Post Office:

1. 1911 ..$ 6 60

1912 .. 51 20

1913

1914

1915

1916

1917

1918

1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924

1925

1926

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Civil Service Commission:

1. 1911 to 1917 inclusive-nil.

1918 $ 96 44

1919

72 961920

235 001921

38 411922 1923

54 671924

48 601925

55 291926

64 41

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Department of Immigration and Colonization:

1. $985.12.

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Privy Council.-Subscription to Morning Journal:

1924 $ 9 00

1925 9 00

1926 9 00

Total $27 00

Department of Health:

1. 1919

1920

1921

1922

1923

1924 9 00

1925

1926

2. 1919

1920

1921 Nil

3. 1919

1920

1921 Nil

4. No.

The Act respecting the Department of

Health assented to the 6th June, , 1919.

Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establish-

ment:

1. 1920 00

1921 00

1922 80

1923 40

1924 00

1925 .. 22 851926 .. 24 12Total 17

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Questions

Department of Public Printing and Stationery:

1. 1911 to 1915 inclusive nothing

1916 $ 42 60

1917 to 1919 inclusive nothing1920

28 001921 nothing1922

20 801923

31 201924

29 311925

28 201926

27 60Total $207 71

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Department of Trade and Commerce:

1. 1911 $ 10 801912

7 201913

7 201914

7 201915

7 201916

7 201917

13 201918

18 481919

18 001920

18 001921

18 001922

12 201923

12 481924

12 241925

12 481926

12 482, 3 and 4. No informtaion.

Department of Public Works:

1. 1911 $ 195 001912

914 311913 1,013 201914

1,306 101915

810 001916

514 181917

922 331918

473 211919

978 511920

1,040 121921

921 871922

36 481923

42 961924

42 961925

42 961926

170 222. Year-Period-Amount: 1914, 12th January to 12th October, $9,424.26; 1915, 12th October, 1914 to 31st December, 1915, $15,297.31; 1916, 1st January to 31st December, 1916, $12,565.68; 1917, 1st January to 31st December, 1917, $12,565.68; 1918, 1st January to 12th January, 1919, $12,975.53; 1919, 12th January to 31st December, 1919, $13,320 83;1920, 1st January to 31st December, 1920, $13,740.68; 1921, 1st January to 31st December,1921, $13,740.68.3. (a) January 12, 1914, to January 12, 1919, 70 cents per square foot; January 12, 1919, to January 12, 1924, 78 cents per square foot; January 12, 1924, to June 30, 1925, 96 cents per square foot, (monthly tenancy).

(b) Average floor space rate paid for space in building of a similar nature, 75 cents per square foot.

4. No.

Department of the Secretary of State:

1. $595.46.

2, 3 and 4. No information.

Soldiers' Settlement Board:

1. $ 37 SO

119 20

2, 3 and 4. No information. Royal Canadian Mounted Police:

1911 nil

1912 nil

1913 $ 8 60

1914 nil

1915 nil

1916 nil

1917 nil

1918 nil

1919

24 001920

6 001921

22 001922

12 121923

9 001924

9 001925

16 501926

9 00

Questions

Department of Railways and Canals:

Fiscal year Advertising Subscriptions Total 1911 $ 3 60 $ 3 601912 3 60 3 601913 3 60 3 601914 3 60 3 601915 3 60 3 601916 3 60 3 601917 30 00 30 001918 6 24 6 241919 59 81 59 811920 50 21 50 211921 42 96 42 961922 55 94 319 141923 55 95 55 951924 49 72 121 321925 61 08 196 081926 71 22 241 62Total $504 73 $1,144 93

Note-The above does not include the Canadian Government Railways.

Department of External Affairs:

1. 1911

1912 $10 80

1913 3 60

1914

1915

1916 10 80

1917 17 50

1918 69 45

1919 75 90

1920 53 16

1921 35 92

1922 88 44

1923 73 46

1924 11 50

1925 78 70

1926 62 98

2. Nothing paid by the Department of External Affairs.

3 and 4. No information in connection with the Department of External Affairs.

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Subtopic:   OTTAWA JOURNAL
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TOBACCO PRODUCTION

LIB

Mr. HEPBURN:

Liberal

1. What is the present production of tobacco

in *

A. Canada,

B. Ontario,

C. Quebec?

2. What is the farm value of annual tobacco crop?

3. What is the growth and present status of export trade?

4. What commercial types of tobacco are grown in Canada?

5. Is Canadian grown leaf used in domestic manufacture? If so, to what extent?

.

6. Are there any districts in Canada not growing tobacco which may be suitable, in view of the increasing export trade?

7. What steps are being taken to increase our export trade?

8. Through what channels has the work of the department been instrumental in forwarding the tobacco industry to date?

9. What are the possibilities of increasing our export trade?

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Subtopic:   TOBACCO PRODUCTION
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LIB

Hon. Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. A. For all Canada about 28,000,000 to 35,000,000 pounds.

B. Ontario-20,000,000 to 25,000,000 pounds.

C. Quebec-8,000,000 to 10,000,000 pounds.

2. Slightly over $7,000,000 in each of the last two years, to the growers.

3. The export is practically all in raw leaf form and has increased very rapidly during the last five years, from 200,000 pounds in 1921 to more than 5,000,000 pounds in 1926.

4. A. Ontario-Burley, flue cured, Green River, dark fire cured.

B. Quebec-Cigar binders, cigar fillers, rough cut pipe smoking.

5. At the present time more than half of the leaf used in manufacture is grown in Canada. Adding to this that portion smoked in the raw leaf state it is estimated that 70 per cent of the tobacco consumed in Canada is grown in Canada.

6. Two years experimental results indicate that the C'kanagan valley, B.C., may be able to produce export leaf of superior quality.

7. A. Improving the quality and increasing the quantity of export types in established growing districts.

Customs Regulations-Toronto

B. Testing out export types in districts not now growing tobacco commercially.

C. Publicity through exhibits, etc., to acquaint the British trade with the merits of Canadian leaf.

8. Introducing and acclimatizing superior varieties suitable to Canada and Canadian trade. .

B. Selecting and improving varieties for Canadian conditions.

C. Testing commonly used varieties and eliminating sorts of inferior commercial value, thus assisting in raising the types and standards of Canadian leaf.

D. Raising large quantities of high quality seed of approved types.

E. Cultural methods in the production of plants and growing the crop as a result of experimental work have materially changed and enormously improved in Ontario and Quebec.

F. Fertilizers. Results of experimental work on fertilization have given farmers reliable information on the proper mixtures and most economical application for different types and on different soils.

G. Experiments and demonstrations in the most efficient and economical handling of tobacco crops in suckering, topping, harvesting, curing, stripping, sorting and packing have had, and are having, a marked influence towards improving the quality of Canadian leaf for domestic and export purposes.

H. The. tobacco division during the past nine years has repeatedly demonstrated on the British and other foreign markets the quality and types of leaf produced in Canada. This has had a marked effect in creating interest and confidence in Canadian leaf by British buyers and to no small extent has been responsible for the rapid growth in our export trade and still greater growth in the demand for Canadian tobacco, from other countries.

9. Of the countries importing tobacco the United Kingdom alone imports about 200,000,000 pounds of raw leaf annually. The British tariff gives colonial leaf a preference of 25 per cent of the import duty or approximately 50 cents per pound; hence the British market alone offers enormous possibilities.

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Subtopic:   TOBACCO PRODUCTION
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OFFICIAL MOTOR CARS

April 14, 1927