April 13, 1927

CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

I was paired with the hon. Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe). Had I voted I would have voted for the amendment.

Topic:   OBJECTION TO MOTION TO CONCUE IN THE REPORT OF RAILWAY COMMITTEE
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CON

William Earl Rowe

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ROWE:

I was paired with the hon. member for Beauce (Mr. Lacroix): Had I

voted I would have voted for the amendment.

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Topic:   OBJECTION TO MOTION TO CONCUE IN THE REPORT OF RAILWAY COMMITTEE
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CON

Charles Hazlitt Cahan

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CAHAN:

I was paired with the hon. member for Cartier (Mr. Jacobs). Had I voted I would have voted for the amendment.

Topic:   OBJECTION TO MOTION TO CONCUE IN THE REPORT OF RAILWAY COMMITTEE
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CON

Leslie Gordon Bell

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BELL (St. Antoine):

I was paired with the hon. member for Beauharnois (Mr. Raymond). Had I voted I would have voted for the amendment.

Topic:   OBJECTION TO MOTION TO CONCUE IN THE REPORT OF RAILWAY COMMITTEE
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CON

Lewis Wilkieson Johnstone

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. JOHNSTONE:

I was paired with the hon. member for Stanstead (Mr. Baldwin). Had I voted I would have voted for the amendment.

Topic:   OBJECTION TO MOTION TO CONCUE IN THE REPORT OF RAILWAY COMMITTEE
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LIB

Edmund William Tobin

Liberal

Mr. TOBIN:

I was paired with the hon. member for West York (Sir Henry Drayton). Had I voted I would have voted against the amendment.

Topic:   OBJECTION TO MOTION TO CONCUE IN THE REPORT OF RAILWAY COMMITTEE
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Motion agreed to.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


PENSION ACT ADMINISTRATION

CON

Mr. YOUNG (Toronto Northeast):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is the Pension Act administered by the Board of Pension Commissioners or by the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment ?

2. If the provisions of the act are given effect in part by the Board of Pension Commissioners and in part by the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment, what part is within the respective jurisdiction of the department and the board, and what parts if any, are under the board and the said department jointly?

3. Hon- is the degree of pensionable disability ascertained, and in such ascertainment what part is the responsibility of the board and what part, if any, is the responsibility of the Department of Soldiers' Civil Re-establishment?

4. By whose authority are pension examination or re-examination carried out?

5. Has the Department of Soldiers' Civil Reestablishment any control over the Board of Pension Commissioners as to administration or otherwise ?

6. Is the Board of Pension Commissioners entirely independent of Soldiers' Civil Re-estab-Iishment ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT ADMINISTRATION
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?

Hon. Mr. KING (Kootenay):

1. The relations between the Board of Pension Commissioners and the Department of Soldiers Civil Re-establishment are defined by P.C. 2722 of the 17th August, 1921, which provides that:-

...the Board of Pension Commissioners shall, through the department, lay down the policy to be followed in the administration of the provisions of the Pension Act."

2. The board is a court of judicature rather than an administrative body. It determines questions of eligibility, of degree of disablement, and is the sole authority competent to

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award or refuse pension. The department pays the pensions awarded by the board, arranges for the routine medical examinations of pensioners and prospective pensioners and is generally responsible for the administrative work involved in giving effect to the decisions of the board and in collecting and collating evidence relating to pensionability. No parts of the act are administered jointly by the board and the department.

3. The degree of pensionable disability is ascertained by the medical examiners and specialists employed by the department, who have been specially trained in assessment work by the medical advisers of the board. They examine individual pensioners and make recommendations as to the degree of disablement. The medical advisers of the board review such recommendations and place them before the board, which approves, rejects or amends them as to it appears proper. The department is responsible for the accuracy and completeness of the medical reports and examinations presented to the board and in respect of investigation reports made by departmental officials for the information of the board.

4. The treatment branch of the department recommends the review dates for medical examinations and the board approves or amends such recommendations. In certain circumstances, the board calls for special medical examinations at other than the regular review dates.

5. Answered by No. 1

6. Yes.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PENSION ACT ADMINISTRATION
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CANADIAN BEEF CATTLE

LIB

Hugh Allan

Liberal

Mr. ALLAN:

L Is the government aware that the beef cattle mdustry is in bad shape in Canada?

2. Does the government anticipate any improvement in the near future?

3. Why has the export of beef cattle to Ureat Britain fallen off in the past 15 months?

4. Is the government doing anything to overcome tins very unsatisfactory situation?

o How many cattle were exported to the United States in 1926?

6. IIow many cattle were exported to Great Britain in 1926?

7. Is the government aware that the transatlantic freight rate on cattle has been reduced to ?15? If so will this rate be in effect this summer from Montreal and Quebec?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BEEF CATTLE
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LIB

Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. The average price of the rank and file of cattle marketed during 1926 was higher than in any of the previous four years, and the market has since 1922, shown a very definite upward tendency. The total value of livestock publicly marketed in 1926 exceeded $47,500,000, as compared with approximately

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$43,000,000, in 1925, $37,000,000 in 1924, $36,000,000 in 1923, and $37,000,000 in 1922. The year 1925 was considered by the rank and file of producers to be the best year experienced in any of the past twenty-five years. At most markets in Canada, the average prices received for the various classes of cattle, marketed in 1926 were in excess of those marketed in 1925.

2. During the present year, the market for good classes of cattle, as well as the ordinary sorts of stock, is either strongly on the upturn, or steady.

3. The price spread as between the British market and the Canadian domestic market has been too narrow to allow of extensive export. The cause for this narrowness has been the poor condition of the British market, due to a depressed industrial situation, as compared with the relatively strong price situation existing in Canada under a keen domestic inquiry, and steadily improving industrial conditions.

4. The government has no control over the state of the British cattle and meat trade conditions.

5. The number of cattle exported from Canada to the United States in 1926 was 92,962 head.

6. The number of cattle exported from Canada to Great Britain in 1926, was 79,985 head.

7. Yes. When this freight reduction was announced, it was understood that it applied to exports from winter ports. We have not been advised as to whether this rate will be extended to include the summer months.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN BEEF CATTLE
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HONEY PRODUCTION

LIB

Mr. HEPBURN:

Liberal

1. What is the annual production of honey in Canada ?

2. Is honey produced to any extent outside of Ontario and Quebec ?

3. Has any honey been exported from Canada in recent years?

4. If so, to what country or countries?

5. How does Canadian honey compare with honey from other countries, (a) in colour; (b) in flavour; (c) in body or density?

6. Is honey graded by the federal Department of Agriculture, (a) for export; (b) for domestic use? _

7. What is the federal Department of Agriculture doing to help develop the production of honey in Canada?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   HONEY PRODUCTION
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LIB

Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. In 1925 the production was 21,000,000 pounds; in 1926 it was slightly less.

2. Yes, in the year 1925 Ontario produced about 10,000,000 pounds, Quebec between 3,000,000 and 4,000,000 pounds, Manitoba

slightly over 4,000,000 pounds, Alberta and Saskatchewan several hundred thousand pounds and the maritimes a small quantity. The production in Alberta's irrigated areas is increasing enormously.

3. There has been considerable export since the year 1925 which now amounts to between 2,000,000 and 3,000,000 pounds per annum from the province of Ontario alone, this being exported largely by the Cooperative Honey Producers' Association. Quebec also has established a small export in clover honey.

4. Exports are mostly to Great Britain but there is also some to Germany, Holland, Denmark and other continental countries.

5. Canada's honey in colour, flavour and body is unsurpassed by other countries exporting to Great Britain. This naturally applies to superior grades. As evidence of this, Canadian honey has taken premier honours in the London show for several years.

6. (a) No official grading; (b) No grading. In explanation of the above, it is only fair to state that the federal department has been assisting the Ontario exporters who had large stocks for export, to the extent of inspecting their honey before it was exported and basing the inspection on sound honey of good quality and according to the grades adopted by that association.

7. The federal department of Agriculture is doing a considerable amount of work toward the development of the honey industry in Canada. Among the present activities are the following:

1. Experimental and demonstration apiaries scattered all over Canada on Dominion experimental! farms.

2. Investigating new areas by placing out apiaries from these branch farm apiaries.

3. Improving the raising of bees now kept in Canada through selection of proper strains, breeding of superior queens, and so forth.

4. Investigating more suitable methods for different parts of Canada in the feeding, methods of establishing apiaries, methods of strengthening colonies, methods of wintering, methods of swarm control, the prevention of robbing, and distribution of disease, extermination of disease, etc. In addition thereto experiments and demonstrations are continuously made in the handling of honey and general management problems.

5. Assistance in inspection of honey for export as above mentioned.

6. In addition to the above the compilation of bulletins, annual reports, pamphlets, press articles and a very heavy correspondence shows a great demand for information in regard to honey throughout Canada. The bee division works closely in cooperation with

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provincial apiaries toward assisting them in their general educational work, service work, etc.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   HONEY PRODUCTION
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ALBION R. FOSTER

CON

Hon. Mr. JONES:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Has Albion R. Foster of Hartland, New Brunswick, been appointed to a position in the customs service?

2. If so, by what authority was the appointment made, and what is the nature and character of his duties?

3. What is the amount of his remuneration (a) for services, (b) for expenses, and how much has been paid to him to date ?

4. Is his employment temporary or permanent?

5. Was the Civil Service Commission consulted as to his employment?

6. Is the said Albion R. Foster the same Albion R. Foster who was the Liberal candidate in Carleton-Victoria in the last federal election ?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   ALBION R. FOSTER
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April 13, 1927