March 7, 1927

PRIVATE BILL

FIRST READING


Bill No. 118, respecting certain patents of James MoCutcheon Coleman,-Mr. Jacobs.


EXCISE ACT AMENDMENT


Hon. W. D. EULER (Minister of Customs and Excise) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 119 to amend the Excise Act.


?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Explain.

Topic:   EXCISE ACT AMENDMENT
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LIB

William Daum Euler (Minister of Customs and Excise)

Liberal

Mr. EULER:

This bill proposes no drastic changes. The amendments provide very largely for removing tracertainties which have been experienced in the way of interpretations of various clauses of the act. Beyond that, the other clauses are designed almost entirely to provide higher penalties for serious violations of the act. There is nothing else of importance in the bill.

Motion agreed to and bill read the first time.

Topic:   EXCISE ACT AMENDMENT
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BRITISH COLUMBIA VEGETABLE GROWERS

ALLEGED PREFERENCE TO ORIENTALS


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. S. F. TOLMIE (Victoria):

Mr. Speaker, I have in my hand a letter from the firm of Hayward and Scott, wholesale produce and commission merchants, Vancouver, B.C., in connection with the export of vegetables to the British troops in China. I will not take up the time of the House by reading it all, but I wish to read this extract:

We notice Mr. Tolmie's inquiry and reply of Mr. Motherwell as to why white dealers and growers had no opportunity of quoting on potatoes supplied to the British forces in China.

We understand these orders were placed by Mr. Clarke who is the Dominion fruit inspector in Vancouver. The business was given to R. Robertson Company, and two shipments were made-R. Robertson Company shipping the first orders-buying both potatoes and onions from Chinese dealers. White dealers and growers had no opportunity of quoting on the first order. There were hundreds of tons of potatoes available in the hands of white dealers and growers, had they been given an opportunity to quote. The second order for potatoes which went forward on the last Canadian Pacific boat, Empress of Canada, sailing from Vancouver February 26, was also filled by R. Robertson Company.

The onions on the second order were supplied by Fraser-Wood Company. Some of the dealers heard this second order was being placed and called up Mr. Clarke, but received no encouragement from him-evidently it was a cut and dried proposition that Robertson Company was to receive this order-Fraser-Wood, however, brought a little influence to bear through Ottawa, and received the onion order.

This statement by Mr. Clarke and Mr. Robertson that it was impossible to supply potatoes and onions from white growers, is absolutely untrue, and also the statement that the time was too short to secure these goods, is also wrong. R. Robertson Company are brokers who do not carry any stocks. It may have been difficult for them to supply goods, but other dealers and growers who carry a stock on hand would have had no difficulty in filling these orders.

R. Robertson Company had the goods put up by Chinamen and these potatoes were grown by Chinamen. Messrs. Motherwell, Clarke and Robertson's assertions that white dealers and growers were unable to supply these goods is untrue.

There are thousands of tons of potatoes both in Vancouver and the adjoining districts grown by white growers and these could have been supplied, had they been given an opportunity of quoting. It surely does not look very consistent to have the Chinese supplying the ammunition to fight the Chinamen in China.

We are enclosing copy of a picture taken on the wharf showing these goods being delivered by the Chinese dealer in Vancouver.

Vermilion Wheat

I have also a picture of the dock showing a large number of potatoes in sacks, a truck loaded with potatoes alongside, with a Chinese chauffeur, and on the side of the truck appears the name Wong Fat. Has the minister any further information on this question?

Topic:   BRITISH COLUMBIA VEGETABLE GROWERS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED PREFERENCE TO ORIENTALS
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Hon. W. R. MOTHERWELL (Minister of Agriculture):

If my hon. friend had given

me an opportunity I might have had the documentary evidence with me. The first offer to fill this order for potatoes and onions was given, so far as my recollection goes, to a firm in the Okanagan valley, but they had not the goods and therefore we had to look for supplies elsewhere. We have not inquired into the colour of Mr. Robertson-I mean the colour of his skin, nor the colour of his politics, but I presume he is white. It never, however, occurred to me to inquire into the nationality of the growers who supplied these potatoes to Mr. Robertson. The second offer to have this order filled was given to Mr. Robertson as a responsible broker and I assume he got them where he liked as long as he complied with the conditions of the contract. There was only one thing upon which the British authorities, through the High Commissioner's office, insisted, and that was that all these goods would be examined carefully by the government inspector and that they must be of the proper quality. That condition was complied with. As regards the statement that some of these growers who supplied the goods to Mr. Robertson were Chinamen, that may be so. I do not know; I assume it is so; but when the overseas authorities wore buying wheat from the western provinces during the war I do not think anybody ever thought of asking who grew the wheat or what colour was the skin of the man who grew it. I do not want to magnify this or to make light of it; but with the Empress of Asia lying in the harbour scheduled to sail on a given date seven or eight days after the first communication, if the goods were not supplied on time and up to quality, the boat would sail without them. That is all I have to say at the present time, except that if it was an inadvertence not to find out in each case just who grew these goods and what was the nationality of the individual, then I must admit I was remiss, but that question was never put up to me by anybody.

Topic:   BRITISH COLUMBIA VEGETABLE GROWERS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED PREFERENCE TO ORIENTALS
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CON

Simon Fraser Tolmie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. TOLMIE:

I would like to ask the

minister if he will be good enough to make every effort to have any further orders filled * by white producers if possible.

Topic:   BRITISH COLUMBIA VEGETABLE GROWERS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED PREFERENCE TO ORIENTALS
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

We will surely give everybody, no matter what the colour of his skin is, an opportunity to supply these goods as long as the price and the quality are right.

Topic:   BRITISH COLUMBIA VEGETABLE GROWERS
Subtopic:   ALLEGED PREFERENCE TO ORIENTALS
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MARITIME CLAIMS

PROPOSED LEGISLATION ARISING OUT OF DUNCAN REPORT


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Hugh Guthrie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, may I express the pleasure which we all feel upon seeing my right hon. friend the Prime Minister back in his place in the House of Commons to-day? He has returned in apparent health, strength and vigour, and we are all glad to see him back. During his absence we have done some serious business in this chamber under the genial guidance of the Minister of Finance, but we always like to have the head of the government present during our deliberations.

Could the right hon. gentleman give us some idea as to when he proposes to bring down to this chamber legislation in regard to the Duncan report? I do not ask him to give me the exact date, but if he could give us the approximate date it would satisfy a considerable curiosity on this side of the House.

Topic:   MARITIME CLAIMS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED LEGISLATION ARISING OUT OF DUNCAN REPORT
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING:

May I thank my hon. friend for the cordial welcome he has given me on my return to the House and also thank hon. members of the House for the hearty manner in which they have received his generous words? Replying to my hon. friend's question, I hope early next week to make a statement on behalf of the government as to the legislation which it is intended to introduce arising out of the Duncan report.

Topic:   MARITIME CLAIMS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED LEGISLATION ARISING OUT OF DUNCAN REPORT
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VERMILION WHEAT

March 7, 1927