February 11, 1927

LIB-PRO

Robert Forke (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

If the hon. gentleman had

given me a little notice that he was going to ask this question I would have been able to reply to him much more fully. I am a new minister just starting out, and I was taken a little by surprise. The Canadian National Railway Company do undertake to find employment for immigrants they are bringing out to this country. I have heard that there has been unemployment in some of the towns in Canada. For instance, we had complaints from Calgary that a certain number of immigrants landed there by the Canadian National Railway were destitute. We made inquiries and found out that employment had been found for all these immigrants from whom we had complaints. I had a communication from the Minister of Labour (Mr. Heenan)-and I can assure my hon. friend that the Minister of Labour is always on his job, and that he keeps very close tab on me to see that I do not bring in any more immigrants than I should-to the effect that there was some unemployment, but I have

heard nothing very serious yet, and I am perfectly confident, Mr. Speaker, that there has been less unemployment this year than we have had for a number of years past.

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   GUARANTEED EMPLOYMENT
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. A. W. NEILL (Comox-Alberni):

Instead of putting it in the form of a question, might I advise the minister that the latest information I have is that there are over one thousand men in Vancouver to-day, or were recently, getting one dollar per day on relief work?

Topic:   IMMIGRATION
Subtopic:   GUARANTEED EMPLOYMENT
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BARNARDO HOMES


Mr. H. C. HOCKEN (Toronto West Centre: I would ask the Minister of Immigration whether he has considered the wisdom of rescinding that regulation of his department which prevents the Barnardo Homes Association from bringing out children.


LIB-PRO

Robert Forke (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal Progressive

Hon. ROBERT FORKE (Minister of Immigration and Colonization):

That is a matter of policy that I am not inclined to discuss in the House at the present time, but when the Immigration estimates come up or at some other convenient time I shall be prepared to go fully into any matters of that kind.

Topic:   BARNARDO HOMES
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INDIAN TRIBES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (Minister of the- Interior):

The hon. member for Vancouver Centre (Mr. Stevens) interrogated the Prime Minister yesterday in respect to the agitation going on in British Columbia in connection with Indian title and I did not happen to be in the House on the occasion of the interrogation. This matter 'has been before the government, I think, during the whole life of the recent administration and for some considerable time prior to that.

Topic:   INDIAN TRIBES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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CON
LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

Yes. During all that period we have endeavoured by negotiation and conference to see if a settlement could not be reached. We had not been so fortunate up to recently as to be able to say that a settlement was even in sight. But we have been making a special study of the whole question, because the provincial government, the federal government and the Indians are all interested in the matter. The adjustment of the reserve's, which was a burning question, is with some few exceptions almost completely settled. The representatives of the Indian tribes are pressing for a judicial investigation of the whole question of Indian title and asking that the matter be carried to the Privy Council.

Grand Trunk Pacific Ry. Co.

That request has not been granted, although it is receiving consideration. We have a committee of the government acting in cooperation with the Deputy Minister of Justice, working on the situation and endeavouring to reach a decision as to whether or not it would be wise to submit the matter for judicial investigation, with the privilege of carrying the whole question to the Privy Council.

Topic:   INDIAN TRIBES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

Might I ask the minister if he has given consideration to my suggestion that a small select committee of parliament be appointed to consider the matter? The minister may not be prepared to answer now, but I again make the suggestion, and only in the interest of bringing about some solution of the problem.

Topic:   INDIAN TRIBES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

I have given that matter some consideration, but we have already spent a great deal of money in bringing witnesses from British Columbia, and I really do not believe that any new evidence can be submitted; there are volumes of evidence already. If a committee of parliament would be helpful, without going to the expense of bringing two or three hundred witnesses from British Columblia, I would be inclined to ask for that assistance, but there has been so much investigation already, so much evidence taken and so much money spent on this controversial question, that I am inclined to think we had better have a try at a solution of the problem by the present committee and see if we cannot get together. We have managed to settle some of the more difficult problems that were engaging our attention. I do not say that we shall settle this one, but we at least want to make a little further attempt to settle it.

Topic:   INDIAN TRIBES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

I earnestly hope the minister will be able to settle it.

Topic:   INDIAN TRIBES OF BRITISH COLUMBIA
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ALBERTA COAL-TRANSPORTATION


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior)

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (Minister of the Interior):

The hon, member for Bow

River (Mr. Garland), I believe, is still awaiting an answer to a question he asked some days ago with respect to a governor general's warrant for $17,000 odd, which is to be found in the estimates, for the movement of coal from Alberta to Ontario. A governor general's warrant for this purpose was passed for the sum of $17,943.64 by the Conservative government just prior to their resignation in September. All of this amount was paid to the Canadian National Railways, and the Ontario government refunded to the Dominion government the value of the coal,

which amounted to $13,647.56. The actual cost, therefore, to the Dominion government for the movement of the test shipment of 2.000 tons was $4,296.08.

Topic:   ALBERTA COAL-TRANSPORTATION
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SUPPLY BILL


On the motion of Hon. J. A. Robb (Minister of Finance) Bill No. 58, for granting to His Majesty certain sums of money for the public service for the financial year ending the 31st March, 1927, was read the second time, considered in committee, reported, read the third time and passed.


GRAND TRUNK PACIFIC RAILWAY COMPANY


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February 11, 1927