February 8, 1927

LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Is it the pleasure of the

House to adopt the motion as amended?

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   *WEDNESDAY SITTINGS
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Carried.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   *WEDNESDAY SITTINGS
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Carried; the House

meets at three o'clock to-morrow instead of at two o'clock.

Topic:   BUSINESS OF THE HOUSE
Subtopic:   *WEDNESDAY SITTINGS
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THE COPYRIGHT ACT, 1921, AMENDMENT


Mr. L. J. LADNER (Vancouver South) moved for leave to introduce Bill No. 45, to amend and make operative certain provisions of the Copyright Act, 1921. He said: This very bill was exhaustively inquired into and a great deal of evidence was heard by a special committee of parliament 'which sat during the session before last. The terms of the present bill are practically the same as those of the bill which was reported by that special committee, and the measure is being reintroduced now. It consists mainly of minor changes with one exception concerning licensing clauses. In other respects the bill contains no matters of great moment. During the interval between the session before last and the present time- that is to say, during last session-I had occasion as proposer of the bill to confer with The late Mr. King, M.P. a number of organizations in different parts of Canada, particularly in Montreal and Toronto, and as a result some of the objectionable features of the original bill were modified. That aspect of the matter will, however, be discussed when the bill is considered in committee of the whole. Motion agreed bo and bill read the first time.


THE LATE MR. J. W. KING, M.P.


On the Orders of the Day:


LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING:

Mr. Speaker, when parliament met in December the constituency of North Huron was represented in this House by Mr. John Warwick King, of Bluevale, Huron county, who was first elected to parliament in the general elections of 1921, and who was again returned in the general elections of 1925 and 1926. To-day the. constituency as you have just reminded us, is without representation owing to the death of its member on January 14.

It is fitting, Mr. Speaker, that before the House resumes its duty we should give some expression of the sense of our loss, and of the sympathy which will be felt in all parts of the House with the relatives and friends who have been bereaved by the sudden death of our late member.

At the time of his death Mr. King had just entered upon his seventy-second year. He was born of Scotch parents at Smith's Falls, Ontario. He received his early education at Bluevale public school and at the collegiate institute of St. Catharines and of Collingwood and at the normal school in the city of Ottawa. For seventeen years he was a public school teacher in this province. He gave up teaching to farm in Huron county, and spent the last twenty years of his life as an agriculturist.

In politics Mr. King was originally a Liberal. He joined the Progressive party in the elections of 1921 and was on each occasion returned to parliament as a member of that party. In this House, while loyal to the party to which he had given his allegiance, he retained in full measure his Liberal convictions and sympathies, and wherever he felt justified in so doing, gave wholehearted support to my colleagues and myself. I mention this circumstance at the moment only because of the larger measure of loss which I feel we on this side of the House share in common with our Progressive friends.

Mr. King was of a quiet and retiring disposition. His voice was not often heard in debate, but his presence made itself felt in his frank and friendy intercourse with the

members, and in his exceptionally faithful attendance in the House. He was a man who made many friends and I should imagine very rarely made an enemy.

A very short time ago Mr. King suffered a great bereavement in the death of his wife, whose loss he greatly mourned. They had no family, but he leaves behind him immediate relatives and many friends by whom he will be greatly missed, and to whom this House will extend its fullest sympathy.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. J. W. KING, M.P.
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (Leader of the Opposition):

Mr. Speaker, this is the second

occasion within a comparatively brief space of time upon which the House has been asked to note the death of one of its members. Mr. King, the former member for North Huron in this House had, it is true, reached what is looked upon as the allotted span of life, but in appearance he retained many elements of youth and displayed great activity for a man of his years. During his career here he was most constant in his attendance, most diligent and assidious in the discharge of his parliamentary duties and while, as my right hon. friend has just said, his voice was not often raised in debate in this chamber, he was looked upon as a man of good judgment and strong common sense, a very valuable asset to this chamber and to the proceedings of this parliament. The loss of such a man will be felt here and perhaps in the constituency which he represented, more than in any other quarter. To his friends there and his friends here and to the relatives who survive him, we join in expressing our sincere sympathy.

Mr. JOHN L. BROWN (Lisgar): It is

perhaps fitting, Mr. Speaker, that a member of the group with which Mr. King was more directly associated should express on this occasion our appreciation of the loss we have sustained. When I say that I shall always remember with pleasure my intercourse with Mr. King, I believe *1 express the sentiments of the group to which Mt. King belonged in this House. We always found him a genial companion, a man of unimpeachable integrity and sound judgment, and his voice was heard in the councils of the group of which he was a valued member. Wte recognize that that group has suffered a loss; we recognize that this House and the people of North Huron have suffered a loss as well, and they will be indeed fortunate if they find a successor to Mr. King who will foe equally faithful to his duties, equally sound in his judgment and equally willing to give all his time and the best that is in him to the service of his constituency and his country. With the other members of our' group I wish to express a sense of the loss we have sustained.

Supplementary Estimates

Topic:   THE LATE MR. J. W. KING, M.P.
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PRO

John Evans

Progressive

Mr. JOHN EVANS (Rosetown):

Mr. Speaker, John King was a man greatly respected by the group to which he belonged from 1921 on, as indeed I think he was respected by all who knew him. He was in this House shortly before Christmas, and it was a shock .indeed to most of us to read in the papers of his death. This .is only another reminder that life is uncertain at the best. Although our friend has reached what is usually considered the allotted span of life, I believe he was still young in the strength of his ideals and in his hopes for the emancipation of his own class. We hope also that the people of North Huron will see fit again to elect a man with the ideals and integrity of character possessed by our friend who has passed away. I would like to convey the sympathy of this group to his friends and relatives.

set forth in proper order and you, Mr. Chairman, read them as if they were just one resolution. That, I think, is not the proper form of procedure.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. J. W. KING, M.P.
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Very well take the resolutions one by one: '

Payment of surplus funds of the Canadian wheat board (governor general's warrant of August 19, 1925), ?560,000.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. J. W. KING, M.P.
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

I think the minister ought to give us an explanation of these items. I notice that each amount is covered by a governor general's warrant, and, of course, the government will be most anxious to explain the use of governor general's warrants in view of criticisms of the past. These are all passed, I notice, in 1925-26, most of them in August, 1925. We ought to have an explanation of each item from the minister.

Topic:   THE LATE MR. J. W. KING, M.P.
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FURTHER SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR 1925-26


A message from His Excellency the Governor General, transmitting further supplementary estimates for the year ending March 31, 1926, was presented by Hon. J. A. Robb (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the House, and referred to the committee of supply.


SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR 1926-27


A message from His Excellency the Governor General, transmitting supplementary estimates for the year ending March 31, 1927, was presented by Hon. J. A. Robb (Minister of Finance), read by Mr. Speaker to the House, and referred to the committee of supply. Hon. J A. ROBB (Minister of Finance): This item has to do with the Department of Trade and Commerce and the minister, as hon. gentlemen perhaps know, is absent to-day in Sarnia. This amount is for a governor general's warrant issued in 1925. Hon. gentlemen will recall that the profits of handling wheat during a certain period were paid to the receiver general. At that time I was the receiver general and I resisted very strongly paying the amount back to the provinces. But my hon. friends opposite, and my genial friend alongside of me (Mr. Dunning), who was then Premier of Saskatchewan, insisted that this money belonged to the people who had produced the wheat. The governor* general's warrant is to meet that request.



The House in committee of supply, Mr. Johnston in the chair: „-?e20lvec* that a sum not exceeding $2,727,376.35, being amount of further supplementary estimates for the fiscal year ending March 31 1926, be granted to His Majesty for the fiscal year ending March 31, 1926.


CON

Hugh Guthrie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

What item are we on?

Topic:   SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR 1926-27
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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

The amount read by the Chairman covers eight items in all. I think that in this particular case each item should be read.

Topic:   SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR 1926-27
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CON

Hugh Guthrie (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. GUTHRIE:

Item 374, providing for the payment of surplus funds of the Canadian wheat board-governor general's war-ran of August 19, 1925-is the first as I understand it.

Topic:   SUPPLEMENTARY ESTIMATES FOR 1926-27
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February 8, 1927