May 26, 1926

WAYS AND MEANS

CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT


The House in committee of Ways and Means, Mr. Duff in the chair. Customs tariff-British preferential tariff


LIB

William Duff (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

Shall the resolution

carry?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink

Resolution agreed to. Customs tariff-Schedule A.


CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

I understand

that we have passed all the items embodied in this resolution and it now merely remains to consider the resolution as a whole. In the course of the discussion of the various items the hon. member (Mr. Cahan) and I both asked that the minister provide, in relation to the items affected by the West India treaty, that those items should1 come into effect only upon the ratification of that treaty. We urged that they be left in abeyance until such time as action one way or the other might be taken upon the treaty. The minister declared that he was following precedent in the course he proposed to take. I admit that he will find precedent for that course, but I assure him that he will not find any precedent for a situation analogous to the present. Under the former treaty with the West Indies, so far as I know, no damage was done to any Canadian industry, and everyone was in favour of the treaty. To-day the claim is seriously put forward that Canadian industry will suffer as a result of the tariff it is proposed to enact in relation to the West India treaty. At the moment I am referring particularly to the increase in duties on cocoa beans, and in order that my objection may be stated as concisely- as possible, I am going to read a letter which I have received from one of the manufacturers. The minister, I think, is perfectly familiar with the circumstances:

When the West Indies treaty is ratified we will have to pay two cents per pound duty on foreign grown cocoa beans, one and a half cents per pound on British grown cocoa beans, exclusive of West Indies kinds, and West Indies kinds wiW come in free.

We will not be able to use cocoa beans grown in the West Indies, except in very limited quantities. The price of Trinidad cocoa beans is always several cents per pound higher than Accra cocoa beans which are grown in British West Africa. We will, therefore, continue to bring in Accra cocoa beans, and will have to pay the duty of one and a half cents per pound on them. Cocoa beans from Jamaica we cannot use except in very limited quantities, because of their poor quality.

I pause here to ask the minister whether there is anything in the foregoing statement of fact with which he disagrees. I do not think there is; the minister does not reply. So that we have no issue on the question of fact that the manufacturers will now have to pay a duty of one and a hail-f cents per pound on the cocoa beans which they import from British West Africa; nor is the fact denied

Special War Revenue Act

that they will be unable to use the beans which will come in from the West Indies. The writer continues:

On from 80 to 85 per cent of the cocoa beans we will use, we will be forced to ipay a duty of one and a half cents per pound or tiwo cents per pound. Now, from 100 pounds of cocoa beans we only gat from seventy-five to eighty pounds of cleaned cocoa beans.

He goes on to indicate what the effect will be on the trade. We have had the discussion as to whether this tariff should be enacted or not, and all I intend to do now is to ask the minister to assure the committee that these duties will not be put into effect until the West India treaty becomes operative.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. ROBB (Minister of Finance):

Perhaps I might call my hon. friend's attention to the trade agreement between Canada and the West Indies, article 3 of which provides:

The Dominion of Canada undertakes to withdraw the benefit of the British preferential tariff from any British country which produces cocoa beans if that country does not extend a preference, satisfactory to the Governor in Council of Canada, to goods the p-oduoe or manufacture of Canada over like goods imported into such country from any foreign country.

We made that stipulation in our agreement with the West Indies: the preference will be withdrawn from British West Africa when this treaty becomes effective.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

It will not be

rione until then

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

No.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Looking down the list

of items in this resolution I notice quite a number of increases in the tariff, .general and intermediate, in some cases, I think, even in the British preference; at any rate there are increases in the general and intermediate tariffs on such items as meats, bananas and so forth. Is that all in pursuance of the policy of free foodstuffs?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

My hon. friend will observe

that there is a corresponding reduction in the British preference column.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Then the free foodstuffs chart was only for the purpose of meeting the wishes of Australia?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

Oh, no.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Or has the chart really

been pitched away?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink

Resolution agreed to. Customs tariff-Schedule B


LIB

William Duff (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

Shall the resolution

carry?

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink

Resolution agreed to. 5. Resolved, that any enactment founded on the foregoing resolutions number two and three shall be deemed to have come into force on the sixteenth day of April, one thousand, nine hundred and twenty-six, and to have applied to all goods mentioned in the foregoing resolutions imported or taken out of warehouse for consumption on and after that day, and to have applied to goods previously imported for which no entry for consumption was made before that day. Resolution agreed to.


PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

Mr. Chairman, what are

you considering? We do not know down here.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I may inform the hon.

member we have just been advised that the chart has been thrown away,-

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Oh, no.

Topic:   WAYS AND MEANS
Subtopic:   CUSTOMS TARIFF, 1907, AMENDMENT
Permalink

May 26, 1926