May 3, 1926

LIB

Pierre-Joseph-Arthur Cardin (Minister of Marine and Fisheries)

Liberal

Hon. P. J. A. CARDIN (Minister of Marine and Fisheries):

I may say, Mr. Speaker, that the matter has not come directly to my attention, but I will be only too pleased to investigate it and consider it most favourably.

Topic:   FISHERY AND FOREST AIR PATROLS
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CON

John Arthur Clark

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. A. CLARK (Vancouver-Burrard):

More or less in the same connection may I ask the Minister of National Defence if it is a fact that the air station at Jericho, in Vancouver, is being closed, and the cruising of timber in British Columbia also abandoned?

Forest Air Patrols

Topic:   FISHERY AND FOREST AIR PATROLS
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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT:

Before the hon. gentleman answers, Mr. Speaker, I should like to put a question in regard to the High River station about which I received a telegram only yesterday. There seems to be very great apprehension on the part of many citizens there that the forest protection service, which has been so efficient in days gone by, is going to be abandoned.

Topic:   FISHERY AND FOREST AIR PATROLS
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. E. M. MACDONALD (Minister of National Defence):

The whole question of the air service for Canada during the coming season is now under consideration. It is being given careful attention by the department.

Topic:   FISHERY AND FOREST AIR PATROLS
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AUDIBILITY OF DEBATE

PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. ROBERT FORKE (Brandon):

We have not heard anything at this end of the chamber of what has been going on; we do not know anything about it. I suppose we shall find by reference to to-morrow's Hansard what has happened.

Topic:   AUDIBILITY OF DEBATE
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LIB

Georges Henri Boivin (Minister of Customs and Excise)

Liberal

Mr. BOIVIN:

The hon. member has not missed much.

Topic:   AUDIBILITY OF DEBATE
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PRIVATE BILLS SECOND READING


Bill No. 93, to incorporate the Canadian Dexter P. Cooper Company-Mr. MacLaren (for Mr. Hanson).


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


GRAIN IN STORAGE-GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR EDMONTON

PRO

Mr. GARDINER:

Progressive

1. How many bushefls of wheat of each grade were there in storage in the Dominion government elevator at Edmonton at the beginning of the crop year 1924-25?

2. How many bushels of wheat of each grade were there in storage in the Dominion government elevator at Edmonton at the end of the crop year 1924-25?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GRAIN IN STORAGE-GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR EDMONTON
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. Nil. The elevator commenced operations in October, 1924.

2.

Dried one northern 4,590-50

Dried two northern 7,759-50

Two northern 9,012-30

Three northern 7,000-00

No. 4 wheat 57,605-50

Feed wheat 737-00

Rejected wheat 1,236-20

Smutty wheat 661-20

No grade wheat 6,297-10

Total 94,900-50

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GRAIN IN STORAGE-GOVERNMENT ELEVATOR EDMONTON
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STEAMSHIP SERVICE BETWEEN CANADA AND CUBA

CON

Mr. ARTHURS:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Are the following ships: Emperor of Havana; Emperor of St. John; Emperor of Fredericton; Emperor of Montreal; Emperor of Midland; carrying on a service between Canada and Cuba?

2. Were these ships formerly the property of the Canadian Merchant Marine? If so, what were their respective names at that time?

3. What was the cost of each, and the price at which each was sold?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STEAMSHIP SERVICE BETWEEN CANADA AND CUBA
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LIB

Hon. Mr. DUNNING: (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

1. Yes. These ships have been utilized in a service between Canada and Cuba during the past winter.

2. (a) Yes.

(b) Emperor of Havana, formerly Canadian Sailor; Emperor of St. John, formerly Canadian Warrior; Emperor of Fredericton, formerly Canadian Sower; Emperor of Montreal, formerly Canadian Trader; Emperor of Midland, formerly Canadian Adventurer.

3. Canadian Sailor, cost $690,409.84, sold for $40,000; Canadian Warrior, cost $819,671.26, sold for $40,000; Canadian Sower, cost $716, 856.63, sold for $40,000; Canadian Trader, cost $686,905.38; sold for $40,000; Canadian Adventurer, cost $717,467.49, sold for $40,000.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   STEAMSHIP SERVICE BETWEEN CANADA AND CUBA
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SHIPMENT OF HORSES FROM SASKATCHEWAN

CON

Mr. ROWE:

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Was an experimental shipment of horses made from the province of Saskatchewan to any other country during the year 1925?

2. Where were the said horses purchased?

3. By what government official were they purchased?

4. What prices were paid for said horses and what were the names of the parties from whom they wrere purchased ?

5. From what point were they shipped?

6. What was the point of destination to where they were shipped ?

7. In whose charge was this shipment made?

8. Is the man in whose charge they were placed a neighbor of Honourable Mr. Motherwell?

9. Have all the horses been sold?

10. If not, what has become of the balance of said horses?

11. What is the name of the man who was sent in charge, and his present address?

12. What was the total cost of transportation and all other expenses connected with the said consignment?

13. What was the total amount received from the sales of said horses?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SHIPMENT OF HORSES FROM SASKATCHEWAN
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LIB

Hon. Mr. MOTHERWELL: (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

1. Yes, an experimental shipment of horses, largely for advertising purposes, was sent to Europe in 1925.

2. In Saskatchewan and Alberta.

3. Mr. Jack Byers and Mr. R. E. Wilson, assisted by the provincial veterinarians of Alberta (Dr. Talbot), and of Saskatchewan (Dr. McLellan).

4. From Mr. D. J. Wylie, Maple Creek, Sask., 36 head at $35 each; from oiaf Olafson

Questions

of Mortlach, Sask., 7 head at $35 each; from Jas. Jackson of Orion, Alta., 1 at $75, 1 at $70, 1 at $35; from Fred Goodner, Orion, Alta., 1 at $52.50; from H. G. Rogers, Orion, Alta., 1 at $55; from Pete Cra'bb, Orion, Alta., 2 at $70, 2 at $50, 1 at $40, 1 at $55, 1 at $90, 1 at $75; from Pete Strand, Orion, Alta., 1 at $55; from Harry Peck, Orion, Alta., 2 at $75; from J. P. Biesterfeldt, Manyberries, Alta., 2 at $70; from Lawrence Biesterfeldt, Manyberries, Alta., 2 at $75; from Rex Peacock, Maple Creek, Sask., 1 at $70, 2 at $75, 1 at $65, 1 at $60; from H. H. Fauquier, Maple Creek, Sask., 2 at $55; from Geo. R. Hammond, Maple Creek, Sask., 1 at $45; Jack Redhead, Maple Creek, Sask., 1 at $40; Bridge Hartley, Maple Creek, Sask., 1 at $65, 3 at $70; E. Birchell, Maple Creek, Sask., 1 at $70; Harry Dowkes, Maple Creek, Sask., 1 at $70: J. J. Wilson, Maple Creek, Sask., 1 at $55, 1 at $50, 1 at $30, 1 at $25; Olaf Finneteg, Maple Creek, Sask., 2 at $65.

5. Moose Jaw, Sask.

6. Rotterdam, Holland.-It should be stated, however, that when it was first decided to undertake this experimental shipment of horses, it was intended to land them at Hamburg, Germany. After the ocean space had been booked, however, Germany announced the imposition of a duty on horses of 500 gold marks per head, Which, at 24 cents, amounts to $120 per head. It was felt that this duty was prohibitive, but, inasmuch as the horses had been bought, and space contracted for, that the shipment should go forward, but to a different destination, and Rotterdam was, we were advised, probably the next best market. Arrangements were therefore made to Ship the horses from Hamburg on arrival, to Rotterdam, Holland.

7. Mr. Jack Byers.

8. No.

9. Yes.

10. Answered by 9.

11. Mr. Jack Byers, Valjean, Sask.

12.

Freight $ 5,426 50Feed en route 1,342 59Insurance, marine 319 00Salaries and wages 1,500 35Living and travelling ex- penses 3,922 86Feed, stabling, drugs, extra help and sundries in Germany and Holland. 11,411 57Sundry Supplies in Canada 220 02$ 24,142 89Buying price of 84 horses 4,032 50Total.. ..$ 28,175 39

13. Disposal:

Sold in Europe .... 82 $7,181 00 Sold in Canada.. .. 1 80 00

Died in Europe.. ..1 -

Total.. .. 84 $7,26100

Notes :

1. The figures given in the replies to questions 12 and 13 are subject to revision, as some of the accounts are still being adjusted.

2. The low prices at which these horses had to be sold and part of the expenses are attributable to several causes, the principal being:-

(a) The putting into effect of the new duty of 500 gold marks on horses entering Germany as at October 1, 1925, the anticipation of which had caused the German market to be overstocked with horses from all sources of supply previous to the date of going into effect of the new' duty.

(b) The failure of forage crops in German territory adjacent to the Dutch and Belgian frontiers, with the result that horses in this territory were thrown on the market owing to lack of feed.

(c) The smallness of the shipment made it hardly worth while shipping the horses for marketing to Czedho-Slovakia or Russia where there seems to be the greatest demand.

(d) Shortly after arrival epidemics of ringworm and influenza broke out among horses, and practically closed off all sales, at same time running up expenses. Nevertheless, much advertising w7as done and Mr. Byers visited various countries getting in touch with governments or horse men, and induced many prospective buyers to visit the stables in Rotterdam with a view of giving them some idea of the type of horse available in Canada. As a result of this advertising, a number of inquiries have come forward from European countries, and one firm in Canada has several contracts under consideration for a large number of horses for delivery this year and next.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   SHIPMENT OF HORSES FROM SASKATCHEWAN
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May 3, 1926