April 23, 1926

CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Just the figures to

make up the total.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Secretary of State of Canada; Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

If it is only figures I

have no objection.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Those figures are taken from the document from which I have quoted. We imported $12,046,315 of books and printed matter. I had intended to say something about the advisability of placing a duty on American magazines coming into this country, because this item is made up to a considerable degree of American magazines.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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PRO

Thomas William Bird

Progressive

Mr. BIRD:

I thought my hon. friend was

going to comment on that list of articles.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Imports Into Canada, 1925

Agricultural and vegetable products.. ..$196,041,785 Animal products 45,703,203

Total ; $241,744,98*

The Budget-Mr. Nicholson

Including the following:

Live animals $ 2,408,507

Cheese (10,274,388 pounds value) 2,304,167

Eggs in the shell (2,721,606 dozen).. .. 957,708

Fruits 27,022,194

Grain and grain products 15,409,018

Hides and skins, raw 9,185,128

Lard and compounds (3,650,269 pounds). 513,341

Leather, unmanufactured 3,834,972

Leather, manufactured 3,405,864

Meats 4,984,456

Bacon and hams 181,562

Fresh pork 1,166,960

Pork in brine 1,041,029

Fresh vegetables 4,272,027

Canned vegetables 13,076,577

Raw wool 6,545,476

Woollen yarns 2,797,645

899,106,631

Miscellaneous woollen goods, manufactured or partially manufactured.. 3 46,595,874

Tweeds 3,065 564

Worsteds and coatings 12,487,601

Special Items

Books and printed matter $12,046,315

Chemical products 27,653,819

Fish 2,234,262

Grease for soap 1,049,463

Settlers effects 6,163,523

Settlers effects exported.. .. $7,540,201 Difference 1,376,678

My hon. friends referred to Saskatchewan and the west. I took the liberty of going through Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta two or three times in the last few years. In 1924 I motored 800 miles through Alberta; I met a large number of farmers, went to their homes and discussed their problems and my own. One afternoon I met a group of twenty-five or twenty-six farmers and their wives at a little gathering in a little town in Alberta and we discussed the common problems of Canada. I asked this question: Will you tell me, you men who have been in this country the time you have, what it is that is holding this wonderful province back? Why is it that you are literally standing still? Why was it necessary for the United Farmers of Alberta on one of the days that I was in that province, to hold a meeting, pass a resolution and send it to this government, pleading with them not to send any more men on to the land in western Canada until conditions changed? The answer came immediately: Because we have no markets. One man said: The only thing we can sell is wheat and we have to transport that across two continents practically in order to find a market for it. If one-half of the farmers are hailed out and the world supply is low and the price is high- we can make a living; but if there is a good 14011-1754

crop throughout the world the price goes down until we cannot make a living. I will say this to my hon. friends as one of those raw easterners who are looked upon with such ignominy by my hon. friends: I have lived in the open spaces of this country for forty-two years; if the growing of wheat is the destiny of western Canada, then western Canada has achieved its destiny because you are growing all the wheat you can find a profitable market for. If there is a member in this House, either of the government or of any of these two groups that can show me or the House- and I say he cannot-where you can market, an increase of fifty per cent in the wheat production of western Canada, I will apologize for everything I have said. But if you do make that increase you cannot find a market for it within the confines of the habitable globe.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
?

Mr. HO WHEN@

Does the hon. gentleman

know that we grow the best wheat in the world in western Canada and does he know that there is always a market for the best products and that there is no danger of our running short of a market for the wheat we grow in western Canada?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

I know that we grow

the best wheat in Canada in western Canada,

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

The best in the world,

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

Yes, the best wheat in the world in western Canada, and no one is prouder of the fact that we can grow the best wheat in the world than I am. But I do not know that the rest of my hon. friend's statement is correct, because I do know there have been years when you could not market your crop profitably in western Canada because you had too much wheat. One of those years was 1923, not so very long ago, when the price of wheat in the world market went down to a point where the western wheat grower himself said that it was impossible to grow wheat profitably. I will repeat my statement that if you increase the volume of wheat in western Canada by fifty per cent you cannot find a market for it within the confines ot the habitable globe.

Let me repeat what these Alberta farmers, real farmers, men who are endeavouring tc develop that country, said to me. They said: If we had a market for our cattle, hogs, butter, cheese and our vegetable products, this would be the Garden of Eden for the farmer. I asked them: Why is it that while the two cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul have been adding half a million people to their population and furnishing a market for the people in the northern

The Budget-Mr. Nicholson

and northwestern states, the cities of Winnipeg, Brandon, Moose Jaw, Regina, Saskatoon, Prince Albert, Edmonton and Calgary have added less than 100,000 to their population? The answer is simply this, that Minneapolis and St. Paul constitute the industrial centre for the northwestern states and for a large part of northwestern Canada due to the fact that we are encouraging United States industry to the discouragement of Canadian industry. Is there any reason in the world why Manitoba, Saskatchewan and Alberta, with all the illimitable resources they have, should not be industrial centres just the same as the northwestern parts of the United States? None whatsoever. Until the people in all of Canada see that the policy that this country should follow is the development of Canadian industry of every single type on a fair and reasonable basis, Canada will continue to stand still or drift backwards. That is the condition.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

What was the

position of the United States farmer just below the line at the same time?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

He was getting more

for his wheat.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

Why?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

If hon. gentlemen want to get the details they have only to consult Hansard, and if they do not want to accept the figures there given they may go to the Department of Trade and Commerce of the United States and have them confirmed.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. IIOWDEN:

Does the hon. gentleman think we could get more for our wheat by having a protective duty?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

This country would not import wheat anyway. I do not want to beg the question at all, and I will say that in my opinion we cannot enhance the price of wheat by a protective duty. But if wheat growing is to be the destiny of western Canada then I say that western Canada has reached its limit. I can tell my hon. friends what we might do-my hon. friend shakes his head. I will not argue the question further. If any hon. gentleman can submit any facts to disprove what I have said he is perfectly at liberty to do so, but I would ask my good friends to tell us where they could find a market for their wheat except such as they have at present. The world's market for wheat is limited; do not make any mistake about that. And let me assure hon. gentlemen that Russia and eastern Europe are not going to remain forever in the condition in which they have been recently.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

John Vallance

Liberal

Mr. VALLANCE:

Was Russia always in that position?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

No, and when Russia was in the world's market for wheat Canada was producing less than half the wheat she produced in 1924.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
LIB

John Vallance

Liberal

Mr. VALLANCE:

Yes, and the United States was exporting more wheat then than she is now. Not only that; we had not at that time the oriental market which is being developed to-day.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
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CON

Charles-Philippe Beaubien

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BEAUBIEN:

Does my hon. friend know that 1925 was the largest crop year we have ever had in the history of Canada?

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink
CON

George Brecken Nicholson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. NICHOLSON:

I have not the figures before me but I do not think my hon. friend is right. Now, western Canada must do the same as eastern Canada has done; she must create a market out there for agricultural products other than wheat. The western farmer must raise cattle, hogs, sheep and other products of this nature. I heard an hon. member make the statement in this House the other day that we raised enough cattle in the Dominion to supply 50,000,000 people. If that is evidence of the extent of the information hon. gentlemen have on subjects of this kind then I sympathize with them. Why, one industrial city the size of Hamilton consumes more beef cattle in a single year than the whole Dominion exported last year, and that was the greatest exporting year we have ever had.

Before I conclude I want to refer once more to the delegation that waited upon the government this afternoon. As one sat and looked into the faces of those men and listened to their plea, which was characterized by an entire absence of the slightest tinge of anything partisan, a plea for mere justice, a plea for hard-working Canadians to be allowed to live and labour in their own country, one could not help being impressed with their grievances. As I heard one greyhaired veteran relate the condition of the war veterans in the city of Oshawa, I recalled the experience I had some years ago when visiting the battlefields of France and Flanders. Going through that devastated area in 1920, I saw the trench systems, the dugouts, the shell craters, all bearing testimony to the heroism of our soldiers; and above all I saw what was literally a forest of crosses covering the whole area. As I looked upon this scene I asked myself why those 60,000 Canadians were lying there, and why they had made that sacrifice. Why did they leave their homes to lay down their bodies in a foreign country, and why was it that 450,000 other

The Budget-Mr. Ross (Moose Jaw)

Canadians made the potential sacrifice?-for they were all, every one of them, just as ready to give up their lives. Why was it that these brave men went and fought over there, so many of them dying in the struggle? It has been said that it was done for France. Well, that is true; it was to save France and Belgium. But the sacrifice meant more than that.

Topic:   THE BUDGET
Subtopic:   CONTINUATION OF DEBATE ON THE ANNUAL
Sub-subtopic:   FINANCIAL STATEMENT OF THE MINISTER OF FINANCE
Permalink

April 23, 1926