April 16, 1926

PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT

LIB

Charles Marcil

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES MARCIL (Bonaventure) moved:

That the first report of the joint committee of both houses on the Printing o-f Parliament be concurred in with the exception of the recommendation as to the printing of sessional papers Nos. 36, 84 , 88, 102 and 110.

Topic:   PRINTING OF PARLIAMENT
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Motion agreed to.


HUDSON'S BAY EXPLORATORY SYNDICATE


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

William Earl Rowe

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. E. ROWE (Dufferin-Simcoe):

I

beg to call the government's attention to an article which appears in this week's Financial Post and to ask a question with reference

thereto. The article to which I refer appears under the following headlines:

Offer Land on Hudson's Bay at Dollar an Acre to Cleveland Citizens.

Exploration Syndicate "Sponsored by Canadian Government" Seeks Memberships on Promise of Land Grant from Dominion-Radio Base and Aeroplane Station.

Will Raise no U.S. Flag on Discoveries.

I do not intend to inflict the whole article on the House but I should like to read some extracts from it. I quote:

"An organization of red-blooded Americans, cooperating with the Imperial Canadian government to encourage exploratory operations into Hudson's Bay and the Arctic Circle." This is the way "the Hudson's Bay Exploration Syndicate, Limited" of Cleveland, Ohio, describes itself.

The syndicate literature indicates that it is soliciting memberships at $2 apiece, and every member is promised an acre of land in the islands or territories contiguous to Hudson's Bay, "when, as if the intended land grants are made by the Canadian government to the syndicate."

The Hudson's Bay Exploratory Syndicate describes itsedf as an organization sponsored by the Canadian government and further sponsors for its operations, as listed, include organizations of much power and influence. They are:

"The Royal Geographic Society.

"The Ancient and Honourable Hudson's Bay Company.

"The Canadian Campfire Club of Cleveland.

"The Arctic Club of Cleveland.

"The MacMillan Polar Club.

"The National Geographic Society.

"The National Aeronautic Association.

"The Canadian-American Exploration Society, and many others."

Objects of the Syndicate

The objects of the syndicate are, by their literature, stated to be:

"To promote closer relations between two great Anglo-Saxon neighbours;

"To encourage the discovery of new territory in the Arctic Basin;

"To further co-operation between the United States and Canada in opening up to sportsmen the vast unexplored territory contiguous to Hudson's Bay;

"To establish headquarters an the Belcher Islands in Hudson's Bay for aerial operations into the unknown wilderness of the north;

"To secure accurate information relative to the Eskimos and Indian tribes;

"To found a permanent radio base in Hudson's Bay;

"To open a summer seaplane route from Cleveland direct to Hudson's Bay;

"To develop the spirit of exploration among its members and awaken a new interest in the possibilities of discovery and adventure throughout the largest remaining unexplored territory in the world, comprising upward of two million square miles."

"By special arrangement between the Canadian government and the Hudson's Bay Exploration Syndicate, Limited, a completely equipped radio station will be established by the syndicate on one of the Belcher Islands in Hudson's Bay," it is stated. "Already plans are under way to acquire

title to the largest fresh water lake, christen the same 'Lake Cleveland' and erect a radio station and se#*-

C.N.R.-Coal

plane base thereon. The lake is 64 miles long, from one to five miles in width and shaped like a hairpin. It is known to abound in fresh seaJl, fish, fowl and game of many kinds.

"With permanent radio and sea-plane headquarters in Hudson's Bay, constant communication with civilization is certain. It will be the most popular hot weather station in America.

"Plans are now under way to secure for the syndicate valuable concessions in the Belcher Island group. It is a sportsman's paradise, comprising about five thousand square miles of wilderness almost wholly unexplored.''

Further with regard to the airplane rate, the promise is made that "By the summer of 1927 the new sea-plane route from Cleveland to Hudson's Bay will be open. Any member of the Hudson's Bay Exploration Syndicate, Limited, can hop aboard at the Cleveland station in the morning, fly across Lake Erie, stop at North Bay on Lake Nipissing for luncheon and arrive at the Syndicate Camp on the Belcher Islands in Hudson's Bay in time for supper."

"The flying distance is a trifle over a thousand miles and the average speed should be 120 miles an hour, making it a delightful and fascinating daylight journey.

"From the syndicate sea-plane base on Hudson's Bay numerous air trips can be made into forests, lake and river regions never seen by white man. The possibilities for the adventurer, the explorer and the sportsman ore beyond comprehension."

Will Raise no Flag

It is assured that:

"By arrangement between the syndicate and the Imperial Canadian government no jurisdictional claims will be made to territory discovered through the efforts of the syndicate or its members, and no attempt will be made to raise the American flag and lay claim to the land for the United States. The syndicate realizes that diplomatic relations with the official Canadian government are at all times essential to its success and therefore yields to Canada the right of possession and ownership to all new (territories resulting from its exploratory operations."

Canada is going to make extensive grants to the syndicate, they state, and it is mentioned tliat for the concession of agreeing not to plant any American flags on any territory "discovered" that:

"In return for this concession the Imperial Canadian government will undertake to grant to the syndicate several large tracts of lands, and groups of islands in the Hudson's Bay region with permission to allot portions of the same to the syndicate members, under and by virtue of a special act of parliament."

Are any such negotiations or proposed arrangements as intimated in this article under way? If not, have any steps been taken to restrain the improper use of the Canadian government's name for advertising purposes?

Topic:   HUDSON'S BAY EXPLORATORY SYNDICATE
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LIB

Edward Mortimer Macdonald (Minister of National Defence)

Liberal

Hon. E. M. MACDONALD (Minister of National Defence):

I was not able to follow the article as the hon. member read it, but I gathered that it referred to some suggested proposal in connection with air-craft exploration. So far as I know no information has reached the government regarding any such project, but I shall read my hon. friend'3 question carefully and advise him later.

Topic:   HUDSON'S BAY EXPLORATORY SYNDICATE
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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS

TRANSPORTATION OF COAL


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Joseph Elijah Armstrong

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. J. E. ARMSTRONG (East Lambton):

f attended a sitting of the Board of Railway Commissioners this morning when the question was discussed relating to rates on the moving of coal by the railways east and west. On March 15 last a resolution was passed by this House, appointing a committee to investigate the question respecting lake and rail transportation, as well as the mining and delivery of coal. A number of questions must necessarily be disposed of before this matter can finally be dealt with, and I would ask the government when we may expect the committee to which I refer to be appointed. It is essential that the committee be constituted before the Board of Railway Commissioners' hearings are concluded, in view of the fact that a number of prominent men are likely to appear before the committee. These men should be given an opportunity to discuss various phases of the question before that committee.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION OF COAL
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I shall have to look at my hon. friend's question as it appears in Hansard, and reply on Monday. I understand that the hon. member refers to some resolution passed for the appointment of a committee. If I am right in that assumption I may say at once that if such a resolution was passed and the committee has not yet been appointed the government will see to its appointment forthwith, provided the whips of the respective parties will confer on the question of membership.

Topic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAYS
Subtopic:   TRANSPORTATION OF COAL
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SELECT STANDING COMMITTEES


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

William Garland McQuarrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. G. McQUARRIE (New Westminster) :

When will the standing committees

of the House get down to work? The session is getting on and so far we have had no meetings at all?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

The committees regulate

their own affairs and the government has no say in their arrangements. It is for the individual members of those committees to arrange for the sittings.

Topic:   SELECT STANDING COMMITTEES
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LIB

Ernest Lapointe (Secretary of State of Canada; Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. LAPOINTE:

Autonomy.

Topic:   SELECT STANDING COMMITTEES
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PARKING ON PARLIAMENT HILL


On the Orders of the Day:


PRO

George Gibson Coote

Progressive

Mr. G. G. COOTE (Macleod):

I would

call the attention of the Minister of Public

Carillon Power

Works to the number of automobiles that are parked in front of this building. Can some other parking space be provided for these cars?

Topic:   PARKING ON PARLIAMENT HILL
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April 16, 1926