March 18, 1926

LIB
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

What is the business for to-morrow?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

There is the

old age pension resolution, and one or two other resolutions that appear on the order paper.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I do not quite understand. The old age pension resolution is quite clear, but what about the other resolutions? Are they those that appear under government notices of motion?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Yes. There

are two or three of which notice was given to-day.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

All right.

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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

What disposition has been

made of my resolution which was moved a few moments ago?

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

There was no resolution. I submit that the House has been declared adjourned.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I said " carried ", but the hon. gentleman knows that after that there was an interchange between him and the Prime Minister.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The minister rose about two minutes after the motion for adjournment was carried.

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PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. FORKE:

I would venture at this time to remark that members in this corner of the House can take no part in this argument because we cannot hear a word of it.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Does Your Honour hold that a motion to adjourn has been made but is not yet carried?

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LIB
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The motion is not debatable.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. gentleman submitted a motion that a moment ago I said could not be put because the order paper was not exhausted. I said a moment ago that this motion could come up to-morrow.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

May I submit to you, Sir, just a few simple reasons? When the motion was submitted, I rose to a point of order. I pointed out that it was out of order and could not be proceeded with. I was upheld and consequently there was no motion made.

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LIB
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

But when? When there is a motion to adjourn before the House. That motion is not debatable and I rise again to a point of order that he cannot now propose it. We must decide the motion to adljourn.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The point is indeed a very fine one. Before the House adjourns every evening leaders on both sides, after the motion is put, speak on matters quite different from the motion to adljourn, and by the courtesy of the members, and by custom from time immemorial, no one has ever taken any objection to that. There is no question before the Chair at the present moment. The Minister of Finance evidently did not notice that the adjournment of the House had been moved and that I was about to declare the

Supply-Point of Order

motion carried. He then inquired about his motion, and I declared that the motion could not be moved. So this is a tempest in a teapot, if I may say so, with all due deference, and without any vindictive spirit. It is well known that every evening before the House adjourns, when the motion is put and often after it has been declared carried, the leaders in the House put questions to each other as to the business for the next day.

Motion agreed to and the House adjourned at 10.40 p.m.

Friday, March 19, 1926

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March 18, 1926