March 18, 1926

IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

How does the hon. member

propose to compel a citizen of the United States to do anything at all?

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EDWARDS (Frontenac):

I do not

know exactly how you will do it, nor do I know just how you are going to enforce this idea either. It is, however, possible to require goods coming into a country to be marked with the country of origin. Legislation along that line, I believe, exists in different countries; goods must be marked "Made in Germany," "Made in France," and so on; that is being enforced in various countries at the present time. If you apply this to eggs, why not apply it to other things? If this is a legitimate and proper way of protecting the poultry men of British Columbia in the production of eggs, why not apply the same principle to the sheep raisers of Alberta and protect them by specifying that all mutton and lamb imported into this country from New Zealand and Australia ^hall be stamped as coming from, those countries before it is allowed to be put on the market here? Why single out eggs more than anything else?

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

One thing at a time.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EDWARDS (Frontenac):

I assume

from that remark that my hon. friend would not very seriously object to applying the principle further; that if he succeeded in having it applied to eggs, he would not object to applying it to mutton, butter or anything else. But I doubt very much the practicability of anything of the kind. The practical way to deal with this matter, I venture to submit to the hon. member for Comox-Albemi-and I hope I shall not shock too severely his free trade tendencies-the reasonable course is to impose a duty on eggs coming into this count-try from the United States, Australia or any

14011-108J

other country, in order to give the poultry men of this country the protection to which they are entitled. If you do that, you will not have to adopt the roundabout way my hon. friend has suggested to protect the poultry men of the province from which he comes.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

David Spence

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. DAVID SPENCE (Parkdale):

I

would like to know if the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Motherwell) understands what the hon. member for Comox-Albemi (Mr. Neill) means. We all know that the container in which the eggs come is marked with the country of origin, but I think he now wishes each individual egg to be marked. How far are you going to go? What are we coming to? What is going to happen to the business men of this country anyhow?

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

This applies only

to imported eggs.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

David Spence

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SPENCE (Parkdale):

That is what

the resolution means, that each egg should be stamped. Do you not think you have given the business men of this country enough work to do already, keeping track of all the regulations and restrictions you have passed? The only thing they have left to do now is to pay the taxes you impose upon them; they have no other privilege in the world People in business in this country today are so sick and sore and tired they wish they were out of it. I never heard such nonsensical twaddle as this in my Life. Hon. members get up here and advocate the most extraordinary things; I never heard the like of them. I only wish the hon. member for Comox-Alberni would get the House to a state where it would clearly understand what the Minister of Agriculture and this government has put the country up against. It is the most difficult thing in the world to comply with all the laws they are responsible for enacting. No matter how desirous you may be of observing those laws you cannot comply with them. Too many restrictions are being imposed on the business world, so much so that the business world is getting sick and tired of the whole thing, and the responsibility rests with the government. We had difficulties when the Conservative party was in power, but under this government they have been increased ten-fold. If the government keeps going on in this way, people will quit business entirely and the business will have to be done in some other way.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

William Foster Garland

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. W. F. GARLAND (Carleton):

I really believe the hon. member for Comox-Alberni (Mr. Neill) is trying to benefit the poultry industry of Canada, but if this resolution is carried out that industry will be harmed in-

Marking of Eggs

stead of benefited. I agree with the hon. member for South Oxford (Mr. Sutherland) that there are already too many regulations in force with regard to the grading of eggs. Under the existing regulations eggs when they enter Canada, whether from China or other countries, are examined as they come through the customs. Not only are they graded, but the quality is marked on the cases, not on the eggs. I believe that is a sufficient safeguard if the idea is to protect our poultry industry.

As the hon. member for South Oxford says, if the Minister of Agriculture (Mr. Motherwell) would adopt some procedure whereby the householders would know what kind of eggs they were buying, it would be a step in the right direction. As matters are at present the householder may think he is buying a first grade egg when as a matter of fact it is an egg of the third grade and is not to be compared in quality with the egg it is supposed to represent. The present trouble is caused by too many regulations and too many grades. As to the requiring the dealer to stamp the eggs, I really believe he has so much to do at present that such a thing is out of the question. In the case of eggs coming from China or the United States they at least should be stamped by the producer in the country from which they come. If that were done the consumer would know when he was eating a Chinese egg, but the stamping should be done by the man in China.

The producers in Canada are not worrying about the competition caused by eggs from China. Those eggs cannot come through the customs as first grade eggs because they are too old to meet the requirements of that grade; therefore Chinese eggs must be classed as thirds. If people want to buy such eggs they should do so after the grade of third had been stamped on them and also the country of origin. That would remove a lot of the difficulty complained of. If the hon. member for ComoxnAlberni would exclude these inferior eggs from Canada altogether, or impose a sufficiently high duty, it would be a benefit to the Canadian poultry industry. The reason those engaged in that industry cannot make both ends meet is because of the unfair competition to which they are exposed, and the present multiplicity of grades. The grades should be properly arranged and simplified so that people will know what kind they are buying. A Canadian egg of the first quality will offer convincing proof of its merits.

Mr. HARRY J. BARBER (Fraser Valley): Let me say in the first place that I am in sympathy with the resolution. During a

previous debate I brought this matter to the attention of the House and in view of the fact that I come from British Columbia and have seen the working out of the act in that province, I feel that I can justly support the resolution. I do not think we need worry about the marking of the individual egg. I know one firm in the city of Seattle who claim that they have no objection to the marking of individual eggs for export into Canada, and the cost would not be over one-half cent per dozen. Therefore I think there is no need for concern over the question of the stamping of the individual egg. We have found in British Columbia that we have little or no trouble. There eggs when put on sale must be marked with the country of origin, so that when the customer comes to buy eggs he or she knows that they are from the United States, or from China, or whatever the country of exportation may be. That system has worked out well in my own province.

I returned from British Columbia this morning, and let me assure my hon. friend (Mr. Neill) that he is not going to solve all the problems of the poultryman through the instrumentality of his resolution. During my recent visit to British Columbia I travelled through some of the outlying districts, and they were bringing eggs in and selling them at the low rate of fifteen and twenty cents a dozen, and at the same time paying a big price for feed. In addition to the marking of eggs I think it is absolutely necessary that there should be an increase of duty. I believe the hon. .member said some time ago that he was quite favourable to bringing the Canadian tariff on eggs to a parity with that of the United States provided that it did not 'interfere with the policy of the Prime Minister (Mr. Mackenzie King). There is no doubt at all that the question of an increase of duty must be dealt with. An agitation in its favour is springing up throughout British Columbia. Deputations waited on me urging that course while I was there, and I have had communications

I think my hon. friend has also received some-in which the raising of the tariff is urged. In addition, the adoption of the eggmarking act of British Columbia was advocated. There is no doubt whatever that the existing situation in regard to eggs must be met, and it must be met by an adequate increase in the tariff. We have got to accord some protection to the poultryman. I am going to support the resolution, but I hope . before the session closes the government will grant some further protection to the poultry industry by making our tariff equal to that of the United States.

Marking oj Eggs

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

I did not like to interrupt Iny hon. friend during his remarks, but I should like to ask this question just for information: My hon. friend said that he had observed while in his constituency that eggs were coming in and selling at fifteen cents a dozen. Could he say from what country those eggs came?

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

Harry James Barber

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BARBER:

They were local eggs. I

was talking to one lady who was lamenting that all she could get that particular day was fifteen cents a dozen whereas -the week before she received twenty cents. Owing to the lack of protection and to the high cost of feed it is impossible to carry on the poultry business there with success. In fact people are disposing of their flo-cks in that particular district at the present time.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Shall the resolution be

adopted? Carried.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

I want to -make only a few remarks.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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?

Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

If I am not interrupted I

will only be a few minutes, -but if interrupted I will be a few hours. I am glad -indeed to find myself in sympathy with and voting on the same line as the hon. member for South Oxford (Mr. Sutherland) for once. I understood him to say-

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EDWARDS (Frontenac):

I rise to a point of order.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

What is the point of

order?

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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CON

John Wesley Edwards

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. EDWARDS (Frontenac):

The point of order is this: The hon. gentleman has already discussed the resolution which he moved and which you, Mr. Speaker, declared carried. 1 should like to know what is before the House.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

It is true that I declared the resolution carried-

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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IND

Alan Webster Neill

Independent

Mr. NEILL:

But, Mr. Speaker, I was

already on my feet.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

The hon. member was

on his feet a-t the moment I said carried. I will give the hon. member the benefit of the doubt, as I am sure he is not obstructing himself.

Topic:   MARKING OF EGGS
Subtopic:   PROPOSED APPLICATION TO DOMINION OF BRITISH COLUMBIA ACT
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March 18, 1926