March 15, 1926

CON

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. On what date did the Trade treaty between Canada and Australia take effect?

2. Have any orders in council been (passed by the govemmemt granting similar concessions to those contained in the Australian treaty in the Customs tariff, to any of the other British dominions?

fMx. Millar.]

3. If so, what was the date of the passing and the numbers of such orders in council?

4. What was the date of the coming into effect of such trade arrangements ?

5. What quantity of the following products have been imported into Canada from Australia and New Zealand during the years 1924 and 1925-meat, wool, hides, tallow, cheese, butter and eggs?

6. What quantity of these products have been imported from the said countries since they received the preferential rate under our customs tariff?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN TRADE TREATY
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. 1st October, 1925.

2. Yes, to New Zealand.

3. Dated 26th September, 1925, No. 1757, and published in an extra of the Canada

Gazette, October 1. 1925.

4. 1st October, 1925.

5. From Australia From New Zealand1924 1925 1924 1925Commodity- Pounds Pounds Pounds PoundsMeat.. .. 196,379 158,591 121.062 116,660Wool.. .. 1,222,171 766.340 2,919,705 606,921Hides .. 602.420 1,335,622 3,179,426 852,460Tallow .. Nil Nil Nil NilCheese .. Nil Nil 7.925 NilButter .. Nil Nil 1,296,707 162,848Eggs.. .. 6. Two Nil Nil Nil Nilmonths ended November 30, 1925 Commodity- From Austral Pounds ia From New Zealand PoundsMeat.. .. 19,008 28.831Wool.. .. 160,422 13,031Hides.. .. 147,201 229,039Tallow.. .. Nil NilCheese.. .. Nil NilButter.. .. Nil 37,800Eggs .. .. Nil Nil

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   AUSTRALIAN TRADE TREATY
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GOLD COMMISSIONER G. P. MACKENZIE

CON

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. What, wild lives have been conserved to date as a result of the government's removal of Gold Commissioner Mackenzie from Yukon and the creation of a new government job Ifor which $8,000 per annum is paid?

2. What protection has been afforded the natives of North West Territories by the same?

3. Why was the sum of $5,750 paid to Gold Commissioner Mackenzie by tile government in 1923?

4. Why was such sum exempted from income tax?

5. Why are amounts paid othei government employees as living allowance not exempted from income tax?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GOLD COMMISSIONER G. P. MACKENZIE
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LIB

Hon. Mr. LAPOINTE: (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

1. Impossible to answer definitely. Mr. G. P. Mackenzie, exploration and development officer, in charge of the Arctic expedition of 1925, in the discharge of his duties conferred on the question of game conservation with the Danish authorities at Godhavn, North Greenland; with Commander Donald MacMillan of the MacMillan Arctic expedition when at Etah, North Greenland; with the

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Royal Canadian Mounted Police officers, who are game guardians of the various detachments on Baffin, North Devon and Ellesmere islands in the Arctic archipelago. He has furnished the department with very valuable information and will continue the work next season. Under Mr. Madkenzie's direction, officers of the department are crossing the archipelago from west to east during the present year securing data regarding wild life and the natives of the islands.

2. The expedition of 1925, of which Mr. Mackenzie was the head, through the medium of the ship's doctor treated and performed operations where necessary on the natives. The medical and food supplies maintained for the benefit of the natives at the various police detachments in the north were renewed.

3. In 1918 in the interests of economy the offices of Gold Commissioner and Commissioner for the Yukon Territory were merged under Mr. Mackenzie, who had been Gold Commissioner since 1912. The living allowance paid officers of the Department in the Yukon other than the Commissioner is $1,500 per annum; that officer received $6,000 living allowance, a furnished government house, fuel, light, telephone, servants, etc. Mr. Mackenzie received none of these perquisites but he was granted to date from April 1st, 1919, an additional living allowance of $1,500 per annum to cover in part expenses necessary for him to incur by virtue of the position occupied. The sum referred to represents the amount accrued from that date. This classification was authorized by the Civil Service Commission.

4. Such sum was not exempted from income tax.

5. Living allowances received by employees as such which form part of the profit, gain, or remuneration of the taxpayer are by subsection 1 of section 3 of the Income War Tax Act, 1917, classed as income liable to taxation.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GOLD COMMISSIONER G. P. MACKENZIE
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CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY-OFFICE SPACE IN TORONTO

CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

What is the lowest rental offer per square foot which has been made for office space for the staff of the Canadian National Railways in the city of Toronto?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY-OFFICE SPACE IN TORONTO
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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. ROBB:

$1.50 per square foot.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN NATIONAL RAILWAY-OFFICE SPACE IN TORONTO
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PACIFIC SALVAGE COMPANY LIMITED

CON

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Is a subsidy being paid by the Dominion government to any salvage company or companies operating on the Pacific coast?

2. If so, to what companies is it paid?

3. What is the amount of annual subsidy?

4. Under what authority is such subsidy paid?

5. When was the first payment of the present subsidy

made ?

6. When was the agreement to pay the present subsidy made ?

7. For how many years is such a subsidy to be paid?

8. What public services do the recipients of such subsidy perform?

9. Is it open to the public to earn such subsidy or is

payment restricted to one company or to certain companies ? #

10. If not open to the public, then to whom is the earning of such subsidy limited?

11. Was the mine sweeper Armentiers of the Canadian navy used in 1925 by the department of Customs in the preventive service or to chase rum runners, and was the said vessel wrecked?

12. If so, what salvage company salvaged her?

13. What amount was demanded by said salvage company for salvaging this vessel?

14. What amount was paid therefor by the government ?

15. Has such an amount been paid by the Customs department or by the department of Defence?

16. If not, what department of the government has paid or will pay same, and how much?

17. Is this amount in addition to subsidy?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PACIFIC SALVAGE COMPANY LIMITED
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LIB

Hon. Mr. LAPOINTE: (Minister of Justice and Attorney General of Canada)

Liberal

1. Yes, under contract.

2. Pacific Salvage Company Limited.

3. $10,000.

4. Order in Council and parliamentary appropriation No. 214.

5. None yet made.

6. Original agreement made September 25, 1915 and renewed September 11, 1925.

7. 10 years.

8. Maintains at all times an efficient salvage plant and equipment at Victoria, B.C.

9. Payment is restricted to the contractors.

10. The contractors.

11. Yes.

12. Pacific Salvage Company.

13. Forty thousand dollars ($40,000) "No cure no pay" or as an alternative ($1,100.00) a day plus a bonus of $12,000.00 upon delivery of vessel at Eequimalt.

14. Forty thousand dollars ($40,000).

15. Department of National Defence.

16. Answered by No. 15.

17. No information.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   PACIFIC SALVAGE COMPANY LIMITED
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CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE COAL PURCHASES

IND

Mr. NEILL:

Independent

1. What tonnage of coal was purchased on the Pacific Ocean by the Canadian Government Merchant Marine during the calendar year, 1925?

2. From whom was it purchased?

3. What quantities were purchased from each vendor?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE COAL PURCHASES
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. 49,878 gross tons.

2. Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Ltd., Nanaimo. B.C.. Wellington-Comox

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Agency Ltd., for Canadian Collieries (Duns-muir) Ltd., Union Bay, B.C.

3. Western Fuel Corporation of Canada, Ltd., 36,782 gross tons, Wellington-Comox Agency, Ltd., for Canadian Collieries (Duns-muir) Ltd., 13,096 gross tons.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE COAL PURCHASES
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EMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES

LIB

Mr. PARENT:

Liberal

1. How many persons, residing in Canada, have emigrated to the United States since 1920, and what is the number for each respective year?

2. Has the government a method by which it can keep track of the provinces from which said persons emigrate ?

3. If so, what is the number for each province, and w'hat numbers were British subjects?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   EMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. Mr. STEWART:

:

1. The Department of Immigration and Colonization keeps no record of persons admitted to the United States from Canada.

2. Answered by No. 1.

3. Answered by No. 1.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   EMIGRATION TO THE UNITED STATES
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IMPORTS OF CHEESE, BUTTER AND EGGS

LIB

Mr. STEWART (Leeds): (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

1. What quantities of cheese, butter and eggs were imported during each of the months of September, October, November and December, 1925?

2. From which countries were such imports made and what quantities were imported from each country during each of the above months?

3. What is the rate of duty on each of said commodities in respect of each country from which such imports were made?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPORTS OF CHEESE, BUTTER AND EGGS
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LIB

Hon. Mr. BOIVIN: (Minister of Customs and Excise)

Liberal

1. September: 2,418 lbs. butter, 65,810 lbs. cheese, 18,813 doz. eggs, 199,800 lbs. eggs n.o.p.; October: 1,745 lbs. butter, 147,014 lbs. cheese, 36,971 doz. eggs, 48,755 lbs. eggs, n.o.p.; November: 39,044 lbs. butter, 126,120 lbs. cheese, 14,071 doz. eggs, 147,672 lbs. eggs, n.o.p.; December, 15,724 lbs. butter, 93,188 lbs. cheese, 48,575 doz. eggs, 158,416 lbs. eggs, n.o.p.

2. In September 2,312 lbs. butter were imported from the United States, 66 lbs. from Newfoundland, 40 from Alaska; in October 1,545 lbs. of butter were imported from the United States and 200 from Newfoundland; in November 1,199 lbs. of butter were imported from the United States, 37,800 from New Zealand and 45 lbs. from Alaska; in December 1,924 lbs. of butter were imported from the United States, 278 from Australia, 13,160 from New Zealand and 362 lbs. from Syria.

In September 699 lbs. of cheese were imported from the United Kingdom, 23,908 from the United States, 15,630 lbs. from France, 16,676 lbs. from Italy, 879 lbs. from the Netherlands, 473 from Norway and 7,545 from Switzerland; in October 1,629 lbs. of

cheese were imported from the United Kingdom, 29,622 lbs. from the United States, 59,235 from France, 48,526 lbs. from Italy, 2,558 from the Netherlands and 5,444 lbs. from Switzerland; in November 13,934 lbs. of cheese were imported from the United Kingdom, 38,220 lbs. from the United States, 24,574 lbs. from France, 27,772 lbs. from Italy, 4,098 lbs. from the Netherlands, 712 lbs. from Norway and 16,810 lbs. from Switzerland; in December 1,136 lbs. of cheese were imported from the United Kingdom, 40,520 lbs. from the United. States, 270 lbs. from Australia, 10,958 lbs. from France, 33,260 lbs. from Italy, 4,231 lbs. from the Netherlands, 2,452 lbs. from Norway, 247 lbs. from Switzerland and 114 lbs. from Syria.

In September 18,491 doz. eggs were imported from the United States, 2 doz. from Newfoundland, 195 doz. from Alaska and 125 doz. from China; in October 35,948 doz. of eggs were imported from the United States, 683 doz. from Hong Kong, 90 doz. from Alaska and 250 doz. from China; in November 11,463 doz. of eggs were imported from the United States, 2,224 doz. from Hong Kong and 384 doz. from China; in December 33,133 doz. of eggs were imported from the United States, 3,896 doz. from Hong Kong, 116 from China and 11,430 doz. from Japan.

In September 400 lbs. of eggs n.o.p. were imported from the United States and 199,400 lbs. were imported from China; in October 1,025 lbs. of eggs n.o.p. were imported from the United States and 47,730 lbs. from China; in November 625 lbs. of eggs n.o.p. were imported from the United States and 147,047 lbs. from China; in December 800 lbs. of eggs n.o.p. were imported from the United States and 157,616 lbs. from China.

3. The rates of Customs duty applicable to butter are as follows:

Butter from the United States, Newfoundland, Alaska and Syria, 4 cents per lb; butter from Australia imported direct 1 cent per lb. butter from New Zealand imported direct 1 cent per lb.

The rates of Customs duty applicable to cheese are as follows:

Cheese manufactured in the United Kingdom and imported direct 2 cents per lb.; Australian cheese imported direct, Free; cheese manufactured in France, the Netherlands, Norway, Italy and Switzerland when conveyed without transhipment from a port of those territories or from a port of a British country enjoying the benefits of the British or intermediate tariffs into a sea or river port of Canada, 3 cents per lb. less a discount of 10 per cent on the amount of duty

Questions

computed; cheese from the United States and Syria 3 cents per lb.

The rates of Customs duty applicable to eggs in the shell are as follows:-Eggs in the shell, being the produce of Hong Kong, Newfoundland and Japan, when conveyed without transhipment from a port of those territories or from a port of a British country enjoying the benefits of the British or intermediate tariffs into a sea or river port of Canada, 2b cents per dozen; eggs in the shell from the United States, Alaska and China, 3 cents per dozen.

The rates of Customs duty applicable to eggs n.o.p. are as follows:-Eggs n.o.p. from the United States and China 17i per cent ad valorem.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   IMPORTS OF CHEESE, BUTTER AND EGGS
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March 15, 1926