March 15, 1926


Mr. L. H. JELLIFF (Lethbridge) moved the second reading of Bill No. 11 to incorporate the President of the Lethbridge Stake. He said: This bill, as the first clause indicates, is for the purpose of forming a corporation sole under the name and style of the President of the Lethbridge Stake of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, generally known as the Mormon Church The territory of this church is divided into certain districts called "stakes", which correspond with the dioceses of other denominations. The posi- tion of president of the stake corresponds very closely to that of a bishop in the other church denominations. The idea of the bill is to incorporate the president of the Lethbridge stake as a corporation sole in order that the properties of the church which are used for religious and charitable purposes, may be unified and administered to the better advantage of the organization. I would ask that the bill after receiving its second reading be referred to the select standing committee on Private Bills. Motion agreed to and bill read the second time.


QUESTIONS


(Questions answered orally are indicated by an asterisk.)


BONANZA CREEK MINING COMPANY

CON

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. Was $100,000 paid by the government to Bonanza Creek Gold Mining Company in 1924?

2. If so, why was such sum charged in the public accounts as cost of administration of Yukon Territory?

3. Who are the officers of Bonanza Creek Gold Mining Company?

4. Where is head office and place of business of Bonanza Creek Gold Mining Company?

5. On the advice of whom with knowledge of Yukon affairs, if anyone, did the government act in consenting to payment of said smn?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BONANZA CREEK MINING COMPANY
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. Yes; cheque was prepared in favour of The Bonanza Creek Gold Mining Company, Limited, and Messrs. Aylesworth, Wright, Thompson and Lawr, barristers of Toronto.

2. According to the Exchequer Court Act, Chapter 140 of the Revised Statutes of Canada, Section 79, the award was paid out of the consolidated revenue fund; and for the purpose of accounting was classified under the expenditure of the Yukon Territory.

3. Frank S. Berry, President; Walter H. Redman, Vice-President; Fred J. Bowen, Secretary-Treasurer; James A. Crotty, Director; Arthur K. Hutchins, Director.

4. Toronto, in care of Messrs. Aylesworth, Wright, Thompson and Lawr.

5. On the advice of the solicitor for the Department of Justice in the case of Bonanza versus The King, who conducted the defence for the crown.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   BONANZA CREEK MINING COMPANY
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CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE

CON

Mr. ARMSTRONG (Lambton):

Conservative (1867-1942)

1. How many boats are owned, controlled, and operated by the Canadian Merchant Marine department of Canada ?

Questions

2. How many of said vessels were in use during the season of 1924, and what was the loss if any incurred in operating these vessels in that year?

3. How many of said vessels can pass through our canals to the head of the lakes, how many of these vessels cou'ld be used for carrying coal or grain, and the capacity of each vessel so equipped?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. 49.

2. (1) 44. (2) The company's operating loss for the year ended December 31, 1924 was $1,440,880.21.

3. Three steamers, viz: Canadian Harvester, Canadian Gunner, and Canadian Beaver could pass through the canals to the head of the lakes and could be used for carrying coal or grain. Each steamer will carry 1,500 long tons deadweight cargo, or 56,000 bushels of heavy grain, through the Lachine canal and the Welland canal, on 14' draft, which is the draft limit for both canals.

Through the Sault Ste. Marie locks the above three mentioned steamers will carry 2,840 long tons deadweight cargo, or 106,000 bushels of heavy grain.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CANADIAN GOVERNMENT MERCHANT MARINE
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JAPANESE IMMIGRATION

IND

Mr. NEILL:

Independent

1. How many Japanese landed in Canada for the first time, according to Canadian government returns, during the calendar year, 1925?

2. At what ports did they land?

3. How were they classified as to (a) occupation,

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   JAPANESE IMMIGRATION
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LIB

Hon. Mr. STEWART: (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

1. Eleven months ended November 30-400. Returns for the month of December are not yet available.

2. Victoria and Vancouver.

3. (a)

Agricultural class-

Males 47

Families 44

Labouring class-

Males 21

Families 87

Mechanics-

Males 3

Families 11

Trading class-

Males 11

Families 22

Male domestics 27

Female domestics 12

Other classes-

Males 5

Families 110

(b)

Adult males 114

Adult females 214

Children under 18 72

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   JAPANESE IMMIGRATION
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CHINESE IMMIGRATION

IND

Mr. NEILL:

Independent

1. How many Chinese landed in Canada for the first time, according to Canadian government returns, during the calendar year 1925?

2. Of those entering, how many came as, (a) members of the diplomatic service and their servants; (b) merchants; (c) students; (d) under section 9, chap. 38 of the Chinese Immigration Act 1923?

3. What was the classification as to occupation of those admitted under said section 9, chap. 38?

4. What was the usual period of residence in Canada allowed under such permits?

5. During the year were any existing permits renewed or extended for a further period, and if so, how many and for what further period?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CHINESE IMMIGRATION
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LIB

Hon. Mr. STEWART: (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

1. No Chinese immigrants landed; 80 Chinese entered under permit (Section 9, Chinese Immigration Act, 1923); 5 entered under Section 5 (a) of Chinese Immigration Act, 1923, being

consular staff.

2. (a) 5.

(b) None.

(c) None.

(d) 80.

3. Actors and actresses 8

Amahs 10

Bank manager and wife 2

Eleve Consul 1

Secretary to Consul 1

Wives of Consuls 2

Members of Consuls'families.. .. 6

Servants of Consuls 5

Doctors of Medicine 2

Infant 1

Merchant 1

Missionary 1

Professor's wife 1

Servants of tourists 5

Students 30

Students' wives 2

Teachers 2

Of which number 33 have already passed out of Canada.

4. Periods vary according to circumstances. The average for 1925 was eight months per

person.

5. For one month 1

For three months 3

For four months 1

For six months 23

For twelve months 32

DOMINION GRAIN RESEARCH LABORATORY Mt. MILLAR:

1. What changes, if any, have been made from July 1st, 1925, to date in connection with the Dominion grain research laboratory located at Winnipeg, as to (a) staff, (b) site, (c) equipment?

Questions

2. How many samples of wheat were tested for protein content in said laboratory during the above period?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CHINESE IMMIGRATION
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LIB

Hon. Mr. ROBB: (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

1. (a) Staff, none, (b) site, none, (ic) equipment, additional moisture testing apparatus has been installed.

2. No samples of wheat have been tested for protein content since July 1, 1'02S.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   CHINESE IMMIGRATION
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GRAIN SHORTAGE CLAIMS

PRO

Mr. MILLAR:

Progressive

1. Taking the weight shortage claims presented to the Grain Commission by grain shippers as a basis, what was the (a) average, (b) maximum, (c) minimum alleged shortage in weight on cars of grain received into the terminal elevators located at the head of the Great Lakes during the last year, for which records are completed?

2. How many weight shortage claims were presented to the Grain Commission during the above year?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GRAIN SHORTAGE CLAIMS
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?

Hon. Mr ROBB:

1. The chief weighmaster reports that, for the statistical crop year ending July 31, 1925, on two hundred and twenty-one (221) individual claims investigated the (a) average alleged shortage per car was 2,500 lbs.; (b) maximum alleged shortage per car was 14,900 lbs. and (c) minimum alleged shortage per car was 840 lbs.

On account of apparent mishaps at unloading, adjustments were secured or recommended amounting to 3,420 bushels on 42 cars, or an average of 81 bushels per car.

On a list of 197 claims presented by one company through a claims agent, the (a) average alleged shortage per car was 2,118 lbs.; the (b) maximum alleged shortage per car was 6,060 lbs. and the (c) minimum alleged shortage per car was 760 lbs.

Note: While the greater number of above cars were unloaded at one elevator, a number were unloaded at three other houses and all were claimed short.

On a list of 97 claims presented by one company, the (.a) average alleged shortage per car was 248 lbs.; the (b) maximum alleged shortage per car was 1,430 lbs. and the (c) minimum alleged shortage per car was 70 lbs.

2. Five hundred and fifteen (515) claims were filed out of two hundred and eighty-eight thousand eight hundred and thirty-seven (288,837) cars weighed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   GRAIN SHORTAGE CLAIMS
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AUSTRALIAN TRADE TREATY

March 15, 1926