March 1, 1926

LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

The way

you quoted it.

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CON

George Black

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

The Minister of

the Interior says "The way you quoted it." Now, hoping I may be able to suit him and his colleagues, I will take occasion to quote it again before I am through and perhaps this will suit him better.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

Make it

fifty times.

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CON

George Black

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

When I quoted

the uncomplimentary, unkind, ungrateful, contemptuous and hostile remarks of the Prime Minister about his faithful and long-suffering allies, the Progressives, led by the hon. member for Brandon (Mr. Forke), the Minister of Public Works objected to the term, and what was the term used? The term used by the Prime Minister was that the Progressives were outlaws in parliament. I do not wonder the Minister of Public Works objected.

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?

John William Bell

Mr. MOTHER YELL:

Will the hon. member tell us what he is quoting from when he makes that statement?

The Address-Mr. Black (Yukon)

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CON

George Black

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BLACK (Yukon):

I will do that, too. In quoting those numberless statements, contemptuous statements by the Prime Minister in regard to the Progressives, I was quoting from such journals as the Ottawa Citizen, the Regina Leader and the Canadian Press, right clean across the continent from Vancouver to Halifax.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Air. STEWART (Edmonton):

Newspaper

statements do not stand now.

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

I was at several

meetings and there was nothing like that.

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CON

George Black

Conservative (1867-1942)

Air. BLACK (Yukon):

Does the Minister of Agriculture, or the Minister of the Interior, or any other member of the government deny the reports? Do they pretend to say that the Prime Minister did not make use of those words?

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Air. MOTHERWELL:

I was at three of

the Prime Minister's meetings in Saskatchewan, and there was nothing even resembling such statements as have been made by my hon. friend.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Air. MANION:

He said it in Ontario.

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CON

George Black

Conservative (1867-1942)

Air. BLACK (Yukon):

Perhaps the hon.

minister expects the Canadian Press to be doubted. Perhaps the minister expects the public to take his word, or that I will, against all those Canadian Press reports. He does not contradict me seriously. He does not mean it.

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LIB

William Richard Motherwell (Minister of Agriculture)

Liberal

Mr. MOTHERWELL:

I am only speaking of what I know, having attended three meetings.

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CON

John Arthur Clark

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. CLARK:

How many meetings did he hold, and did he make the same speech at every meeting?

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CON

George Black

Conservative (1867-1942)

Air. BLACK (Yukon):

When I quoted the Prime Minister's references to the Progressives, on Friday night, the Minister of Agriculture interjected "That is from some Tory rag," and he thought he had disposed of it. I wonder if he would call the Manitoba Free Press a Tory rag. !I will read What the Manitoba Free Press says about him.

If Mr. King, as a result of his organization, is not able to produce a government with more decision and punch than the one that appealed to the country on October 29, then it is not worth while going ahead with the proposition. If that is the kind o-f government that reappears after the recess of parliament, the end will not be far out of sight. Something a good deal better is required. The country is not hankering for a general election, but it will not be satisfied with a process of backing and shuffling at Ottawa that has for its object the keeping of a certain set of politicians in office.

That is not exactly a Tory rag. It is a good Liberal organ, talking about the Min-

HOil-89

ister of Agriculture. It refers to the Minister of Agriculture as one of the set of politicians in office, and that, Mr. Speaker, is the whole head and front of the government's case, to hang on to office. They cannot get away from it. As a matter of fact, this government has sunk to such depths that the Free Press cannot follow it any longer. It wants something better than that set of politicians in office. The government that went to the country in October is the same government, it is composed of the same gentlemen who occupy the treasury benches to-day, and the Free Press says we have got to have something better. But the prospect of producing something better is certainly not very bright. The public mind is simply shocked at the lack of self-respect exhibited by this government. It is admittedly, through the mouth of its Prime Minister, hanging on to office- for what? For the loaves and fishes, for the spoils of office, for the salaries and emoluments. The Prime Minister admitted that there were great problems pressing for solution, and that he could not solve them; he could only mark time and he and his colleagues draw their salaries and enjoy their emoluments. I ask them to-day, what do they propose beyond that? What afccomplish-ment can the country hope for beyond that? I think I am justified in using that language; as a matter of fact, it is not my language, but the Prime Minister's own. If any hon. member disputes that I refer him to the files of the public press. Look over the files of the Regina Leader; I did that myself this morning. I have quoted Canadian press despatches of the Prime Minister's speeches, some from Liberal and some from Conservative papers, also, despatches carried by the Canadian Press, which is an impartial service sent to tall the newspapers of Canada. I was not quoting editorial comment, but simply news items.

Mr. Speaker, the government's plain duty is to hand in its resignation. As some objection has been taken to my quoting the Prime Minister's remarks in regard to the government's allies to my left, I might as well pursue that theme a little further. The Minister of Public Works said, "I object to that term," referring to the term "outlaws in parliament." Mr. Speaker, the Prime Minister would not use that term to-day to the Progressives in this House; he would not dare to do it, but he had no use for them then. He thought he was through with the Progressives. He never thought he would have to go to them with his hat in his hand, begging for the continuance of his political life. But there they are, begging to be

The Address-Mr. Black (Yukon)

allowed to continue to draw tiheir salaries. The Prime Minister admitted that that was all he and his government could do, and now he is begging for support from the people, the Progressives, of whom, he said, "They will think twice before voting us out and so relinquishing their $4,000 indemnity." That is the way he sized up the Progressive party. That is worse than if he had said they were purchasable by legislation, which is not parliamentary.

I say again, that no government having branded certain members of this House as outlaws, as a holier-than-thou group, as a group that thought more of its $4,000 indemnity than it did of its independence, as a group whose usefulness was at an end, as a group that had practically disappeared, as a group that was standing in the way of the interests of the west, as a group that was simply helping to make the west ridiculous- I say that no government that has branded a party in this House in those terms can retain its self-respect and accept favours at their hands.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

May I ask

a question? Is the hon. member serious in making the dozen or two statements he has just made,' as to the exact words of the Prime Minister?

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

He said it over and over again.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

Mr. Speaker, when an hon. gentleman rises in this House to ask a question, it is rather a strange thing the leader of the opposition (Mr. Meighen) cannot let the hon. member answer.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

The leader of the

opposition will not interfere with his answering. If there is anyone in this House who interferes constantly, it is the Minister of the Interior (Mr. Stewart).

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (Edmonton):

The whole onslaught is being directed against the Minister of the Interior and the government. The Minister of the Interior will take care of himself as well as the government. All I am asking the hon. gentleman, and I hope this time he will at least give me a direct answer, is this: Is he honest in attributing

all those adjectives he has just used to the Prime Minister of Canada? Does he infer for a moment that the Prime Minister made those statements at any public meeting or at any place, with the single exception of the first statement? That I have not contradicted, although I have very grave doubts whether it ever was made.

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March 1, 1926