February 22, 1926

CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

I am glad

to have that statement from the hon. member. If the proposal is merely to pass legislation to provide for the formation of something in the nature of a land bank or some system by means of which securities may be pooled, as the hon. member suggests, then I am prepared1 to give such a proposal fair and honest consideration, the security being always understood.

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CON

Peter McGibbon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. McGIBBON:

That is not in the

Speech from the Throne.

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

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LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

Do you think the opinion of Dr. McGibbon should be placed alongside that of a man like Captain Bernier, who has spent half his life in the far north?

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

Yes, I do,

for this reason: Dr. McGibbon is a professor

of political economy. His duty is to study the economic questions which affect this country, and he has been studying them from the standpoint of Alberta. On the other hand Captain Bernier is an explorer. He goes through those northern waters in a vessel suitable for making exploration, not in a com-merical vessel adapted for the carriage of grain to the markets of Europe.

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PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

Where would Dr. Mc-

Gibbon get his information on this subject?

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

I have no

doubt he had before him the very evidence that Captain Bernier has given with respect to this matter. However, Dr. McGibbon, as a professor of political economy, would arrive at his conclusions after due consideration of every report he could possibly get. He would not form his opinion from any shallow investigation, but after a proper consideration of every particular feature that might have been presented to him in regard to the subject. I would far rather accept the opinion of a man who had made such a thorough study of the question than the opinion of Captain Bernier.

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LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

May I ask the hon.

gentleman another question?

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

Yes, but

speak out so that I can hear you.

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LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

Does the hon. gentleman know that the Hudson's Bay Company for the last one hundred odd years have imported the goods they needed into Canada by that route, and exported their bundles of furs in the same way, ini preference to the more southerly route?

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

I do not

know anything about Dr. McGibbon further

than that he is reported to have made, before a convention of the agricultural societies of Saskatchewan, the statement I quoted. He was invited to address that convention, and the gentlemen responsible for extending the invitation to him must have had some respect for his ability and his judgment or they would not have asked him to address them on the Subject. I accept what Dr. McGibbon said, and the fact that he is professor of political economy in one of our foremost Canadian universities gives me ground for believing his report and relying upon it.

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LIB

John Power Howden

Liberal

Mr. HOWDEN:

I was not talking about Dr. McGibbon but about the Hudson's Bay Company.

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

There is the trouble. I have some difficulty in hearing in this House, and] if I have not answered the hon. gentleman's question directly it is because I did not catch its exact terms.

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PRO

John Livingstone Brown

Progressive

Mr. BROWN:

If the hon. gentleman is relying so much upon the opinion of a professor of political economy let me say to him that most authorities on that subject are in favour of free trade.

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

Are they?

That may be, but this opinion by Dr. McGibbon is dead against the Hudson bay proposition.

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LIB

Malcolm McLean

Liberal

Mr. McLEAN (Melfort):

Would the hon. member rather entrust his life and property, if he had to go on such a trip, to Captain Bernier or to Professor McGibbon?

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. ANDERSON (Toronto):

I would trust my life rather to the man who arrived at his judgment, as Professor McGibbon did, after a profound study of the subject. Professor McGibbon studied not simply the reports of one man, but all the reports he could collect and he has given us his well-considered opinion. Captain Bernier is an explorer, and is prepared, Kke any other adventurer, to take a chance-the chance I would not take. Professor McGibbon is not taking chances, and I, as a citizen of Canada, am not going to take any chances. I do not want to disparage Captain Bernier; he is doubtless a Canadian of whom we ought to be proud, but he is an explorer and as such would take a risk that you and I would not take. I do not doubt that hon. gentlemen opposite or hon. members to my left would not feel like going. to the Arctic ocean and running the risks that Captain Bernier has run, personally I am comfortable enough here. I would rather rely on the studied judgment of a professor

The Address-Mr. Anderson (Toronto)

of political economy in the province of Alberta than I would on Captain Bernier.

So far as the Hudson Bay railway is concerned, a certain amount of money has already been spent on the line, and the people of the western provinces want the project extended to the bay. I am prepared to meet their wishes to the extent of building the road to the bay rather as an experiment, because we have already spent something like $22,000,000 on the work. My idea is that if we were justified, even to only 'a small degree, in spending $22,000,000, we will be justified in making a further expenditure of three, four, five or even six millions to extend the line to the bay and find out whether or not the project is any good. But the moment toe enterprise is shown to be not feasible or not practicable I shall hold the Liberal party and the Progressives accountable for the advice they have given this parliament in its favour. So much for that. Now the next-

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PRO

William John Ward

Progressive

Mr. WARD:

Will the hon. member not

give some credit to the party to which he belongs for the sum of approximately $20,000,000 already expended?

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CON

Alexander James Anderson

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mi. ANDERSON (Toronto):

The hon.

.gentleman must understand that a contract was entered into by the Liberal party before 1911 for the building of this line, and the Conservative party were honest enough to try to carry out that contract. They did not 'believe, like the German kaiser, in regarding contracts as scraps of paper. The action they took was an honest endeavour to carry out the contract into which their predecessors had entered. In any event the Liberals have been in power for the last four years, and why have they not carried out the work?

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PRO

William John Ward

Progressive

Mr. WARD:

Why was the work on the Hudson Bay railway stopped in 1918?

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February 22, 1926