February 1, 1926

CON

Leon Johnson Ladner

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. LADNER:

Does the hon. member

not think it is better public policy that strawberries, for example, which come two or three weeks earlier from the United States, should, if possible, be kept out or prohibited by a protective duty, in order that we may maintain the strawberry industry later on? In other words, for the sake of having these strawberries three weeks in advance, should we destroy an industry that maintains a great many people in this country?

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LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

This situation

has existed for some time and I would ask the House whether the strawberry industry in Canada has been ruined.

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CON
LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

Very largely

nothing. And the masses of the people of Canada can afford to eat strawberries only when they get a little cheaper; otherwise they have to do without them.

Now there is another matter on which I want to say a word or two and that is the question we have heard discussed in this House on several occasions during the present session. I refer to the insinuations that have been made in regard to alleged bribes or bids or whatever one may choose to call them. I was very much astounded when I read in the press the speech of the leader of the opposition which he made at Portage la Prairie during the campaign. That speech was reported in the Saskatoon Phoenix, from which I quote the following:

Later he qualified Premier King's pronouncement to the west on the Hudson Bay railway as the promise of a "bribe."

A bribe to me is something more or less serious, and I would call the attention of hon. members to the fact that the undertaking to build the Hudson Bay railway is nothing peculiar to the Liberal party, and that it has been promised by the Conservatives as well. It is not a new project. I was quite pleased indeed to hear the hon. member for South Winnipeg (Mr. Rogers) in his speech the other night frankly admit that all parties had been committed to the scheme away back, so long ago that I have forgotten the origin of it. Both the Liberal party and the Conservative party have all along taken the view that the railway must be built, and in 1910 the Liberal party actually started the work of constructing the Hudson Bay road. But it

600 COMMONS

The Address-Mr. Young (Saskatoon)

did not stop there. The Conservative party carried it on, although it was suspended for a time; and the Prime Minister of this country, after rehabilitating the shattered finances of Canada as he found them when he came into office, felt that, the tariff having been reduced, the time had come when we might again take up the building of this railway. I heard the leader of the opposition make the statement that in this regard the prime Minister was asking for Liberal support. Well, Jet me read from the Saskatoon Phoenix of September 29 what the Prime Minister said on the subject:

"I think," he went on, "that the time has come when that completion should be carried out. I think the time has come when that road should be completed to the bay."

Now that is a matter of policy and it was stated openly on the public platform not only in that part of the country but throughout the Dominion. And when has it become a crime for a Prime Minister to declare in public the policy for which he and his party stand? Later on in this House we had a good deal of discussion, the suggestion being made that the matter was embodied in the Speech from the Throne as a bribe to the Progressive party opposite. Again I ask, since when has it been a crime for a policv to be stated on any platform in the country and to be outlined in the Speech from the Throne, foreshadowing legislation?

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CON

Ambrose Upton Gledstanes Bury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURY:

Has the hon. member the rest of the Prime Minister's statement at Saskatoon in which he declared that he would support the building of the Hudson Bay railwav if the west gave him an adequate Liberal support?

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LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

I have some more of the Prime Minister's speech and I will read it for the information of the hon. gentleman:

Mr. King turned more particularly to the west. He observed that at the last elections the prairie provinces had returned only two Liberals and one Independent-Liberal-or two and a half Liberals. From the Great Lakes to the Pacific coast -the government had only six followers returned. He spoke of Conservatives as the natural enemies of Liberals, of Progressives as the natural friends oif Liberals. "I am not going to antagonize our friends," he declared. "I am going to try to bring Liberals and Progressives together on things ithey have in common, in order that the common enemy may not take charge of the administration of this country.

That is the way in which he referred to the matter out there. The Prime Minister was trying to get those who thought alike on many things to co-operate in supporting the policies which he was enunciating at the time. f.Mr. A. M. Young.]

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CON

Ambrose Upton Gledstanes Bury

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BURY:

May I ask the hon. member what construction he would put upon the statement, made to the Progressives who wanted the Hudson Bay railway, that the Prime Minister would carry it through if he were given Liberal support?

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LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

Perhaps I had better quote some more:

"I think," he went on, ''.that (the time has come when that completion should be carried out. I think the time has come when the road should be completed to the bay, and I am prepared to say this, that if I get the necessary support-

The word Liberal is not there.

-in -the way of followers from western Canada to enable me jto carry out Liberal policies generally that will be one of (them. But I am not going to promise to t-he west that I will carry out only one particular policy that is of concern to ithis part of the west primarily unless I can see my way clear -to make good that promise. I can see my way to do it if I can get the following I need in the House of Commons to bring it about.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I must ask hon. members not to interrupt the member who has the floor.

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LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

I do not mind the interruptions of my hon. friend (Mr. Bury), although I remember he told us the other night that he believed in a policy of retaliation. That seems to me to savour of the principle of an eye for an eye and a tooth for a tooth, which was condemned in Christian countries about two thousand years ago. I am not surprised therefore that the hon. member should seek to imply that the Prime Minister had said more than is reported here. The Prime Minister was reported very clearly in western Canada, and while it may be taken for granted that he was more anxious to have Liberals than any other group support him, hon. gentlemen should take his words as they are fairly reported. I was present and heard his speech and I know that there was no bribe offered, nor was there any word which the Prime Minister uttered on the platform in that splendid gathering which could possibly be construed as a bribe or anything of the sort. But in this House the other day we had an offer submitted to hon. gentlemen, which offer will be found at page 97 of Hansard. The hon. member for South Wellington (Mr Guthrie) is reported as follows:

I submit that no member of this House should look beyond the question in the resolution; but if we are tempted to go beyond it, if we are tempted to consider ulterior results,-

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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

I rise to a point of order.

I submit, Mr. Speaker, that it is not in order

The Address-Mr. Young (Saskatoon)

for an hon. gentleman to quote from a speech delivered in a previous debate in the same session.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I was not aware that the hon. member was quoting the actual words of a speech delivered during the present session.

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CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

The hon. member was quoting from a speech delivered by the member for South Wellington in the debate preceding this one.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

Of course, it is not within the rules for an hon. member to quote from a speech delivered in a previous debate in the same session, but reference may be made indirectly to such a speech without its being actually cited from Hansard.

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LIB

Alexander MacGillivray Young

Liberal

Mr. YOUNG (Saskatoon):

Accepting your ruling, Mr. Speaker, I will not read further from the hon. member's remarks, but I take the liberty of summarizing what he said. Speaking about ulterior motives, he made the statement, on the authority of his leader, that if his party received support it could carry on for two or three sessions.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

In support of my ruling I would refer the House to Beauchesne's Parliamentary Rules and Practice, paragraph 234, where in treating of rule 19, the following will be found:

Besides the prohibitions contained in this rule, it has been sanctioned by usage both in England and in Canada that a member, while speaking, must not:

(a) refer to any debate of the same session on any question not then under discussion; nor

(b) refer to any debate in the Senate, but he may refer to the official printed records of the Upper House, though they have not been formally communicated to the Lower House.

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CON
LIB
LIB
CON

Henry Herbert Stevens

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. STEVENS:

It is not that at all. It is simply to have the ordinary rules of debate followed. My hon. friend is entirely wrong in his interjection.

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February 1, 1926