January 22, 1926

LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

Well, perhaps it is, but do not forget that the campaign of American prejudice against Mackenzie King was waged all over the province of Ontario.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

William Alves Boys

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYS:

Has my hon. friend quotations from any other paper in the province of Ontario? He seems to have an abundance of newspaper quotations. Has he some others from Ontario? .

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

There is this distinction

between that paper and Le Canada and Le Soleil, that its owner is not a member of this House.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

So far as 'Le Canada is

concerned I do not think I am mistaken in saying that the only quotation the member for Kent gave from that paper was the quotation of a speech alleged to have been made by the Premier of Quebec. I.think I saw it explained in the paper at the time that the report of that meeting had been clipped from one of the Quebec papers, But I do not want to screen myself behind that. I am offering proof that in certain parts of Ontario there was a campaign of prejudice waged against the Liberal party which, in my opinion, is much worse than anything the hon. member for Kent has been able to produce.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

William Alves Boys

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYS:

Will my hon. friend answer

my question?

The Address-Mr, liinjret

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

My point, Mr. Speaker,

is this: if the member for Kent did not desire merely to bring material benefit to his own party, but wanted to lay the bare truths before this House, his duty was to further acquaint himself with the conditions of the campaign in other parts of Canada and to lay the whole thing before the House. He had no right to read Le Soleil only and attempt to create the impression in this House that while we had waged a campaign of prejudice in Quebec everything had been pure and rosy and serene in other parts of the Dominion.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

William Alves Boys

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYS:

Once more I ask my hon.

friend if he will be courteous enough to answer my question.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB
CON

William Alves Boys

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYS:

My hon. friend knows what

it is.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

My hon. friend wanted to know if I could quote from other papers?

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

William Alves Boys

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYS:

I merely wanted to have the

hon. gentleman give quotations from any other papers in the province of Ontario.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Lucien Cannon (Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. CANNON:

It is rotten enough now.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

William Alves Boys

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BOYS:

I am not speaking to my hon. friend.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Lucien Cannon (Solicitor General of Canada)

Liberal

Mr. CANNON:

We have had too much

of it already.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

The hon. member for

Kent ended his speech with a great appeal for national unity. I want to ask him now if these quotations which I have just given are fair samples of the appeals for national unity made by his own party? He referred, in a fiery peroration, to the career of the late Sir Wilfrid Laurier, and said he was going to teach us a lesson of tolerance, expressing the hope that we would follow better in future the teachings of that great Liberal chieftain. It is a striking fact, Mr. Speaker, that since Sir Wilfrid Laurier disappeared from active political life his grip on the minds of my Conservative friends has tremendously increased. We are asked to remain 'true to the Laurier policies and the Laurier ideas, and now the hon. member for Kent takes it upon himself to ask us to practise the Laurier tolerance. AH his life Sir Wilfrid Laurier was subject to misrepresentation by the Conservative party. *He was branded1 in the province of Ontario as being disloyal to the crown, and stamped a traitor to his race in the province of Quebec, Now that he is dead these hypocrites praise him and hold him up to us as an example. We have no lesson to learn from the hon. mem-IMr. Boys.]

ber for Kent. The Liberal party has ever been a party of tolerance and conciliation, and we are well able to preserve the Laurier qualities and traditions without relying on those who (attacked him all his life and who are now *trying to use his memory as a weapon with Which to fight his true and legitimate successors. Let the hon. member for Kent and other Pharisees strike their own breasts. We do not claim perfection. We acknowledge that in the heat of a political campaign there is on all sides a tendency to indulge in excessive language. That is inevitable. We Liberals are willing to admit that and also that perfection does not belong to this lower world. But before directing his attack against us and posing as a champion of public purity, the hon. member for Kent, if he had been anxious ,to proclaim the truth, might have looked in his own party and perhaps into the recesses of his own conscience. That would have taught him a lesson in humility and repentance more essential to his moral improvement than the lesson he has tried to teach us, at the command of his leaders and at the expense of his compatriots.

I feel, Mr. Speaker, that I should now hasten to the last part of my speech. I want to refer to some of the features of the Speech from the Throne. Mention is made of the tariff, and I wish to say that as far as I am [DOT]concerned-and I think I speak the minds of my Quebec friends, and Liberals generally *-we do not consider the tariff so much a matter of doctrine as a matter of business. We are not addicted to racial prejudice, notwithstanding what has been said against us, but we will never bow before the prejudice of high protection. We know very well that our friends opposite are too prone to confuse high tariff with protection. There are many ways of protecting industries besides raising the tariff. You may achieve the same purpose if you lower the tariff on raw materials 01 some of the articles entering into the fabrication of the finished goods. You also protect industries most directly if you open to the exports of this country markets in other parts

The Address-Mr. Rinjret

was said that that was on account of the tariff, but a few months later the Arrow Shoe *.Company of Montreal opened another factory in the same town of St. Hyacinthe, under the isame tariff and the same conditions, and it is [DOT]very prosperous to-day. What are we to conclude from that fact, if not that the tariff alone has not much to do with prosperity or failures-if there are any-in the industrial *world. The government has promised that it will establish a tariff commission.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Peter McGibbon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. McGIBBON:

Will the hon. gentleman say how many industries depending upon the shoe industry have failed and gone out of business?

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

That would take me pretty far. I am sorry my right hon. friend was not in our province during the campaign, where he would have heard the whole matter discussed1.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Peter McGibbon

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. McGIBBON:

Many industries depending on the shoe industry have gone out of business in Ontario.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

My hon. friend will readily understand that I cannot open up the whole question of the shoe industry. I must confess that I am flattered at the great desire of these gentlemen to hear me, but I must not forget that other speakers are to follow, and must not prolong my remarks unduly. The reason I mentioned the tariff was merely because I wanted to come to the amendment of my right hon. friend the leader of the opposition. If I understand the amendment well, the right hon. gentleman finds no fault at all with the Speech from the Throne.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink
CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Oh yes.

Topic:   GOVERNOR GENERAL'S SPEECH
Subtopic:   ADDRESS IN REPLY
Permalink

January 22, 1926