January 22, 1926

IND

Joseph Henri Napoléon Bourassa

Independent

Mr. BOURASSA:

We publish no portraits

of any kind.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

Those were the inspirers

of Mr. Patenaude at that time, and not the right hon. gentleman. The hon. member for St. Lawrence-St. George was a Patenaude candidate, and I was surprised, as I listened to him in the House the other night, to find that he could speak in such a buoyant and partisan manner against the government and in favour of my right lion, friend's amendment. In fact he went so far that you, Mr. Speaker, had to call him to order. The first chance that the hon. member for St. Antoine had in this House he rose indignantly and in a tremulous voice said that he would stand forever for the leader of the Tory party. Well, that is a great victory for my right hon. friend. If he had been in Montreal at the time of the campaign he would not have counted very much on either of those gentlemen, unless he knew the undercurrents.

But the reason I raise the point, Mr. Speaker, is not merely to put these facts before the House; it is in reply to my hon. friend from Kent, N.B., who yesterday complained of the way in which we had treated his right hon. leader in Quebec. He cited an editorial, or rather a despatch in Le Canada, and he explained because we did say that we did not like the rhetoric of my right hon friend-a very minor matter, after all. Let me now ask the member for Kent: Have the

Liberals in Quebec ever offered a grosser insult to the leader of the Tory party than the Conservatives did during the recent campaign in our province? My hon. friend says that we misrepresented the leader of the Tory party. But these gentlemen in Quebec did not want him to represent them at all; on the contrary, they wanted him to be forgotten. In their opinion he was going to disappear. They rejoiced in the fact-my right hon. friend played them a trick there-that he was a candidate in Portage la Prairie because, they said: He will never be elected there-we will never hear any more of him. Is not that a greater insult to the right hon. gentleman than anything we have said in Liberal speeches or printed in Liberal papers? I stand here and say to the member for Mount Royal (Mr. White) that I never wrote or countenanced in my own paper, Le Canada, anything like the editorials I read about my right hon. friend in the Gazette or in the Star. And after all we were attacking his policies. We were his political opponents. But they were attacking his very personality, and they were dealing with the leader of their own party. We were fighting him in the open warfare of a political campaign; they were trying to stab him in the back, they were conspiring to sink him in oblivion. Will the member for Kent say that this was not worse than anything that he has charged against us? Perhaps the leader of the opposition feels that sometimes we have gone to extremes in attacking him. Even so, I tell him that no public man has been worse treated and more deeply humiliated than he has been in the province of Quebec by the .candidates of Mr. Patenaude, who did not want even to pronounce his name, who exclaimed it was a slander if we tried to connect them with the right hon. gentleman. Why did not the member for Kent mention that? If he wanted to demonstrate the truth, if he wanted to purify the political air-as he seemed to-and not merely scavenge in an effort to gain a flight party advantage, why did he not mention that? He could not quote one line either from Le Canada or from Le Soleil, i-and he gave us many quotations from that paper-which expressed such a want of confidence in his own leader and so misrepresented him as did the attitude of the candidates of the Tory party in the province of Quebec during the last campaign. What stronger prejudice could be raised against the leader of the Conservative party than that created by the attitude of Mr. Patenaude, who ignored him completely, who even objected to his setting a foot in the province during the

The Address-Mr. Rinjret

campaign? Can the member for Kent recall anything printed in the Liberal papers or spoken by the Liberal candidates which can parallel this unheard-of and most scandalous attitude of the Conservatives in Quebec towards their own leader? I am going to be fairer to him than they have been. As a Liberal I stand by my leader; but if I were a Conservative I would either insist on a change in the party leadership or else stand1 by the right hon. gentleman. And I will give him credit for this, thiat if he had come into the province he might perhaps have done no better, but he certainly could no't have done worse than Mr. Patenaude.

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CON

Donald Sutherland

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

Mr. Patenaude is not a member of this House.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

No, he is not a member of this House because the voters in the province of Quebec did not want him to be.

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CON

Donald Sutherland

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

Exactly.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

Mr. Patenaude was the

Conservative leader in the province of Quebec in the last campaign. If he was not, then the Conservative party had no leader there at iall, and consequently did not take part in the campaign. Perhaps I should make an exception in favour of the member for Argenteuil who has great personal .prestige in his county -and who knows how to spread that prestige around him. He won a personal victory. And perhaps I should make some concession to the member for Mount Royal, who was not very warm for Mr. Patenaude, but who did say very clearly that he recognized no master, that he was a rule unto himself-like the member for Labelle (Mr. Bourassa). But all the other candidates in the province of Quebec were Patenaude candidates. Nobody can deny that. If my hon. friend from South Oxford (Mr. Sutherland) really wants to know what took place in the province of Quebec he should listen to me and not rely on what he heard yesterday.

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CON

Donald Sutherland

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. SUTHERLAND (South Oxford):

I

have heard.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

They were all Patenaude candidates. They would have nothing to do with my right hon. friend, they would not stand by him; he was to disappear. They were all for standing by Mr. Patenaude, and if I insist upon that point, Mr. Speaker, it is because I want to tell the member for Kent that never has any Liberal offered the member for Portage la Prairie so grave an insult as that which came to him during the last

campaign from the Conservatives of the province of Quebec under Mr. Patenaude.

What was Mr. Patenaude's campaign? After very clearly asserting his independence of my right hon. friend, he stated that the country would soon be bankrupt if it remained under the Liberal regime. He inserted in various papers in Montreal and also in Quebec city a number Of posters in which he depicted factories that were closed and1 ships that were bringing in imports in such volume that the country would soon be ruined. A very strange picture, Mr. Speaker, by contrast with the latest trade figures for the past nine months, which show that we have increased our trade by over $300,000,000 due largely to a great expansion in our exports. Hon. gentlemen opposite always claim that as a result of the tariff reductions made by this government the country would be flooded with foreign goods. On the contrary, our imports have decreased while our exports have steadily increased; in other words, our favourable balance of trade is improving all the time. Notwithstanding this growing prosperity, Mr. Patenaude was trying to demonstrate that the country would soon be bankrupt, that all our factories would inevitably be closed, and that if the Liberals were maintained in power much longer everybody would be ruined. I might point out that although they printed the picture of Mr. Patenaude the posters all emanated from the Central Conservative Committee, 120 St. James street, Montreal. I do not want to quote them all, but in the course of the campaign my friends the Conservatives became lyrical and I would like to quote a few paragraphs to illustrate that phase. They predicted what was going to happen if the Liberals were maintained in power. Here is one advertisement published on October 26, called "La terre qui meurt"-"The death of the soil." This is a dramatic dialogue between Baptiste and Catherine. They do not tell us who Baptiste and Catherine were, and I regret, Mr. Speaker, that we cannot have these illustrations inserted. They would very much enrich my humble text, but unfortunately I know that my hon. friend would not support such a motion, because I did not give the customary two days' notice. I will not press that point.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I will waive that objection if the illustrations of yesterday are put in also.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

I know my hon. friend

is always prone to substitute his amendments

The Address-Mr. Rinjret

for our motions. Let us listen to Baptiste. He is made to say:

Baptiste: Our future is very dark, my poor wife; cur three sons have left for the States and we will soon have to part.

Catherine: You think they will not come back?

Baptiste: It is easy to see that from the letter you have just read, but how can it be prevented? It is not their fault. I understand they do not wish to till the soil and reaip debts.

Catherine: How is that? We used to live happily on our farm.

Baptiste: Then we had another government. The King government has sold us to the United States.

Later on:

Baptiste: That must change, and immediately. I heard Mr. Patenaude the other day-our only chance is to vote for him on the 29th.

Catherine: You are right, Baptiste. I never mixed in politics before, but as long as .politics are depriving me of my own sons it is another question. I will crawl on my knees to the polls if necessary.

I am afraid the lady was late in reaching the polls. This poster is signed by the Central Conservative Committee, 120 St. James street, Montreal. Here is another one, called "The voice of the spires." Again I am sorry, Mr. Speaker, that you will have to miss the illustrations. There is represented a steeple in the province of Quebec, with a voice issuing from it. There is apparently nothing the Conservatives cannot do during election time; here they have a spire which can talk. This is what it says:

It is the voiiice of the spires of Quebec, weeping on hundreds of deserted parishes on thousands of cold hearths. It is a voice plaintive and mournful. Through the vast spaces it goes to all those Canadians who have left our country, full of the accents of the tenderness of their beloved mothers.

Then this advertisement calls the young men back, and it adds:

Inflated by the indignation of a population which has been deceived and sacrificed-

That is Quebec.

-lit becomes terrible and revengeful against those politicians who are responsible for such a dire calamity.

Then the steeple asks:

What have you done with our sons, Mr. King? Where are they? But Mr. King, whose ears are turned towards Winnipeg, does not hear the mournful voice of the spires of Quebec.

That, also, is signed by the Central Conservative Committee, 120 St. James street, Montreal. This is part of the campaign waged by Mr. Patenaude on behalf of the Conservatives in the province of Quebec. You will notice, Mr. Speaker, that it mentioned in this last beautiful lyrical effusion "the ears," of Mr. King, "are turned towards Winnipeg." This was one of the features of the campaign of Mr. Patenaude, accusing us in Quebec of having sold our province to the Progressives

of the west. That was the leit motif, the musical theme, which you heard time and again returning, and proving to be the main feature of the speeches of Mr. Patenaude and his candidates. I commend this to the attention of my good friends from the west. It was claimed during the previous debate that all we gave the west could be contained in a small suitcase. Evidently there is a difference of opinion as to that; if you listen to Mr. Patenaude it was not a small suitcase but a whole warehouse, even the whole province of Quebec, that we gave the west. And I shall prove that. Here is another advertisement published on October 13. The title is "A Nefarious Alliance," and it reads as follows:

Haunted by the spectre of defeat, Mr. King is re-soa'ting to every means. He canno-t hope to avert a disaster except by an alliance and he begs openly for the Progressive vote. At the same moment-who would fail to understand that?-the liberal chieftain delivers himseif into the hands of a group of selfish men who put their own interests above that of the country. By accepting their tutelage, Mr. King accepts necessarily absolute free trade. The Progressive-Liberal alliance, which is nothing else but a shameful bargaining, would achieve our ruin, and the electors will prevent it.

That was one of the first advertisements published by the 'Central Conservative Committee in Montreal, but there were others. They followed very rapidly, and I am afraid I cannot mention them all. There was one on October 19 headed "How Quebec is Being Deceived and Mocked." I will read it in Frenbh first:

Des raamours aux progressistes, des soufflets k la province de Quebec, voi!& comment se partagemt les affections de M. King.

In English it is as follows:

Love tokens to the Progressives; slaps in the face for the province of Quebec. Such are the affections and sentiments of Mr. King.

There was another one on October 20, where again you see the picture of Mr. Patenaude. That man was photographed very often during the last campaign. Here you have the whole story of how the King government began in 1921 to betray the province of Quebec-and not only in 1921, but also in 1922, and in 1923. The government is said1 to have made not concessions but bargains, practically giving away and betraying the province of Quebec into the hands of Progressive members. I have another one here published on the 23rd of October:

The King government has failed, deplorably failed, in its primary duty towards Canada.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Hear, hear.

The Address-Mr. Rinjret

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

It was Mr. Patenaude

who said that; I see hon. gentlemen opposite are in agreement with him. It goes on:

Oil any lowering of the tariff the solid bloc of Quebec has betrayed the workingmen of our old province and delivered them in exchange for favours from the Progressive party.

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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

That is correct.

Mr. RINFRET: That is the sort of

campaign that was carried on. Here is another one, dated the 26th of October:

On one side Mr. Patenaude and his candidates-

Not Mr. Meighen, but Mr. Patenaude and his candidates.

-who are devoted wholly to the interests of the province of Quebec. On the other side Mr. King and his candidates allied to the Progressives of the west against the interests of this same province of Quebec.

But here is the prize one, Mr. Speaker,and I have saved it till the last. I wishI could pass it around to show hon. members.

Here is a picture of the Right Hon. Mr. Mackenzie King, not with a small suitcase, but with a very large bag, and he is putting in the bag 65 members from the province of Quebec, including even our friend Mr. Marler, who is pictured on top of them all.

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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

He is in a bag, all right.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

The picture shows the

solid bloc of Quebec being delivered to the Progressives of the west as a gift from the Right Hon. Mr. Mackenzie King.

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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

Hear, hear.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

It may please my hon.

friend, but it did not fool the electors in my province. The title of this picture is, "The Province of Quebec Sold," and it says:

The Progressive members are too clever to overlook that Mr. King needs them and counts on their help to escape defeat. Therefore they do not fail to blackmail him-

That is a pretty strong term.

-and put a price on their support. That is why we have seen the Liberal chieftain at every one of his [DOT]meetings in the west increase the number of his concessions. He is willing to go still further until he has satisfied the exigencies of these 'saviours. Likewise the Indians of the northwest before obtaining possession of the big hunting gun that the fur hunters stuck before them, had to pile up before them as many skins of beaver as were needed to reach the height of the gun, but while Mr. King sings, who will pay for the music? Canada undoubtedly, but more especially the province of Quebec.

I may explain for the benefit of those members who do not understand French that the French word for "sing" and "blackmail" is the same. This will help hon. gentlemen to understand why it is said in the first paragraph that the Progressives are going to blackmail the leader of this party, and why later on it says that while he "sings" Quebec is going to pay for the music. That advertisement, like all the others I have referred to, is signed, "The Central Conservative Committee. 120 St. James Street, Montreal."

But there are more, and now I come to a different style of advertisement that was used in the campaign of the Conservatives in our province, under the Hon. Mr. Patenaude, and I hope that my hon. friends opposite who yesterday cheered and applauded to the point of nearly destroying the furniture of the state will listen to this, and appreciate the sort of campaign that was waged against us, and what we had to fight against in my own province.

This was published on the 28th of October. Here is Mr. Mackenzie King welcoming Sir Clifford Sifton and Mr. Norris. Sir Clifford has in his hand the constitution of the province of Alberta and of the province of Saskatchewan, and he is shown tearing them, and tearing also the guarantee that the Catholic and French minorities have in those provinces. Mr. Norris is shown throwing into the waste-paper basket a small French catechism, a religious book in our province, and Mr. King looks on and smiles complacently. Not only is the Right Hon. Mr. King pictured, but my good friend the Minister of Marine (Mr. Cardin), and the Minister of Customs (Mr. Boivin), and even the Minister of Justice (Mr. Lapointe); they have respect for no one. These three ministers are shown in line behind Mr. Mackenzie King enjoying immensely the performance I have described. Here is the text of the advertisement, which I commend to the hon. member for Kent, N.B. He might quote it in his next speech; it might win him applause somewhere else. It reads:

An Odious Conspiracy

Hatched Against Quebec,

Its Language and its Religion.

Masks fall off and now we understand why the King government is so keen for Senate reform. Norris and Sifton have wrung that promise from it-it is the only one that it will keep.

These two rabid enemies of all that 'is French in Canada, have never laid down arms. After banning our language from the schools of the west, they are now storming the French fortress of Canada; their spite is now turned against Quebec and it is from our schools that they now wish to ban our language, for which we have fought so hard.

Norris and Sifton have realized that the Senate is the most solid safeguard of the Catholic and French minority in the country. Consequently they resolved to have it reformed in their own way, by placing in it men of their choice, men wbo before their appointment, have promised to vote for all government measures.

Norris, minister in the government, Sifton leader of a Liberal majority in the Senate, that is all that is necessary for the fanatical work begun in the west by

The Address-Mr. Rinfret

these two enemies of Quebec, to extend th rough out the country. Norris and the other fanatics that the west shall have elected, will do what Sifton did in 1905: they will force the government to proscribe the French wherever it still survives and Sifton, in the Senate, will have these iniquitous laws ratified by the senators that he will have had appointed by Mr. King and who will have promised to ratify all that came to them from the House of Commons.

That is the aim of Senate reform, in the minds of its real authors, Norris and Sifton: Total suppression of French in Canada!

The choice that Quebec will make to-morrow is a choice between:-

Es. L. Patenaude, on one hand, and T. C. Norris and Clifford Sifton on the other.

Norris! the fanatic who has never laid down his arms, who has sworn hate and death to all that is French in the country.

The man who has taken down from the walls of the schools of Manitoba, the last crucifixes forgotten by Greenway, his model!

The man who has wrought from the hands of little French-Canadian children in Manitoba, the A.B.C. in which they could learn to read in French!

The man who forbade these little ones to say "mama" and "church" in French!

Sifton, the man who in 1905, pushed Laurier down the "rock of the constitution" by forcing him to sacrifice in advance and for all time, the rights of the Catholic and French minority in the two new provinces of Alberta and Saskatchewan!

The man who negotiated with the North Atlantic Trading Company, the contract which brought to the west, at $5 per head, the scum of Europe so as to drown the French population which had already settled there!

It is at the instance of these two men that Mr. King parades the country to-day; it is for them that he asks Quebec to vote in preference to the Honourable E. L. Patenaude, a true son of Quebec, whose vibrating voice, the French voice, has been applauded throughout the province for over a month.

In the face of Norris and Sifton, arose Patenaude! and all Quebec is rising behind him for the defence of its rghts treachously menaced.

The Senate will remain what it is to-day, declared Mr. Patenaude, so that Quebec may continue to remain what it is, Catholic and French; so that from one end of the country to the other, French may regain the place to which it belongs, the place taken away from it by Norris and Sifton.

Halt Norris!-Halt Sifton!-Patenaude is there!

This is signed "The Central Conservative Committee, 120 St. James Street." I need not say that this has nothing to do with the St. James division.

But there is the conscription issue, and I now come more closely to the remarks of the hon. member for Kent, N.B. The hon. member was very careful yesterday to pick from the campaign in Quebec selected paragraphs and incomplete statements with a view to making a passing remark the main theme, and he has endeavoured to create the impression that the campaign in Quebec had been waged on conscription. I declare, however, and no one can controvert the accuracy of the statement, that conscription was not the theme of our campaign, nor was it the theme of Mr.

Patenaude's campaign. It is true that the issue was occasionally mentioned and that we were occasionally provoked to discuss this phase of the war issues. Nevertheless, I must say, and I say it on behalf of the whole province, I say it on behalf of both political parties in Quebec, that the campaign of 1925 was not waged on conscription either by our own leaders or by Mr. Patenaude. It remained for the hon. member to raise that issue at the instance of leaders of his own party and more especially of some of the official fanatics of that party whose whole political careers have been given to the slander and misrepresentation of the province of Quebec.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Order.

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Some hon. MEMBERS:

Take it back.

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LIB

Louis Édouard Fernand Rinfret

Liberal

Mr. RINFRET:

Some hon. gentlemen opposite are calling out " order ". If any hon. gentleman opposite recognizes himself in this picture let him take the floor and raise a point of order.

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January 22, 1926