January 22, 1926

REPORTS


Report of the Superintendent of Insurance on loan and trust companies for the year ended December 31, 1924; report of the Superintendent of Insurance on civil service insurance for the year ended March 31, 1925; report of the Ottawa Improvement Commission for the year ended March 31, 1925 Hon. Mr. Robb.


AUDITOR GENERAL'S REPORT


On the Orders of the Day: HENRY DRAYTON (West York): Mr. Speaker, might I ask my hon, friend the Minister of Finance (Mr. Robb) when we may expect the Auditor General's report?


LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Hon. J. A. ROBB (Minister of Finance):

Mr. Speaker, about a week ago I directed the attention of the Auditor General to the fact that the time had elapsed for the tabling of his report. He replied that owing to circumstances over which he had no control-

Topic:   AUDITOR GENERAL'S REPORT
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CON
LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Trade and Commerce; Minister of Finance and Receiver General)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

-the report was delayed, but that he was using every effort to have it ready for tabling. In justice to the Auditor General I think I should remind hon. members that parliament this year was called earlier than usual.

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ALBERTA COAL-TRANSPORTATION


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. B. BENNETT (West Calgary):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to ask my hon. friend the Minister of the Interior (Mr. Stewart) as to what steps have been taken to ensure the movement of coal from Alberta to Ontario. Last session a sum of money was made available for the purpose of ascertaining the exact cost per ton of transporting coal from the west to the east and to meet any deficit that might arise by reason of the transportation costs being greater than $7 per ton. Large quantities of coal are now obtainable, in fact I am advised that 100,000 tons could be supplied in three weeks if that quantity could be used in central Canada. I understand that the National Railway management did not avail itself of the $25,000 subvention voted by parliament. If a rate of $7 per ton could be assured for future shipments beyond the 25,000 tons that has been or is about to be moved, and that has not absorbed any part of that subvention, there would be a ready market

Chicago Drainage Canal

for large quantities of coal in central Canada. If the hon. minister has any observations to make they will be gratefully received by those who are actively interested in coal production in Alberta.

Topic:   ALBERTA COAL-TRANSPORTATION
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Hon. CHARLES STEWART (Minister of the Interior):

Mr. Speaker, it is quite correct .that last year parliament voted $25,000 for the specific purpose of moving a quantity of coal from Alberta to Ontario, which movement was to be of the nature of a test. A careful accounting of the transportation costs was to be kept by a nominee of the Alberta government. Arrangements were all completed, as I understood the matter both from Sir Henry Thornton and Premier Greenfield, and the government of Canada was to contribute $1 a ton if the rate should be $8; if it should be $9, the Alberta government was to contribute the other dollar, making $2 in all. However, just before the inception of the movement the railway company handled the 25,000 tons without calling upon either government to make good any loss that might accrue. Therefore that money has not been used for the purpose for which it was voted.

About six weeks ago, when it began to become apparent that the strike in the anthracite field might create a fuel shortage in the central portion of Canada, or what we call the fuel area, the fuel board took steps to ascertain the situation. We found at that time that seventy per cent of the quantity required for this area had been already moved into the country. Since that time I cannot say definitely what further quantity has come in. We took occasion to notify the railway companies that if they were required to do so we would be greatly obliged if they would mobilize their rolling stock at convenient points to hurriedly move large quantities of coal to central Canada both from the east and the west. So far no serious situation has developed, largely I think owing to the very mild weather that we have been experiencing; but should the situation become acute we are ready to lend every assistance we can, and I know that the railway companies are prepared to move the coal very rapidly if a market can be found for it. Of course, it will mean that the prices will be somewhat higher, but in view of the possibility of a shortage it will be necessary to take every precaution to meet any emergency. [DOT]

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CON

Richard Bedford Bennett

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. BENNETT:

Might not the $25,000 or a portion of it yet be available for the movement of an additional quantity of coal beyond the 25,000 tons contemplated by the original arrangement? rw TV'TuneM.]

Topic:   ALBERTA COAL-TRANSPORTATION
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (West Edmonton):

When I was discussing this matter six weeks ago that possibility had occurred to me, but the money having been voted for that specific purpose, the Auditor General, or someone in his department, advised that we could not use it for this purpose. However, if it became necessary to grant assistance to the movement, I know the federal government would facilitate any assistance that might be necessary.

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CHICAGO DRAINAGE CANAL


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. R. J. MANION (Fort William):

Mr. Speaker, I desire to ask the leader of the House (Mr. Lapointe) if in view of the ill feeling that is being engendered on both sides of the line by the Chicago diversion, now called the Chicago steal-I think very aptly- the government is making any move to deal with this; and if the government was represented at a big meeting in Detroit the other day. I believe this question is so important that a statement from the government should be forthcoming in order to let us know what .progress if any, is being made in regard to it.

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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (West Edmonton):

Mr. Speaker, I would prefer to have the hon. gentleman wait until Monday in order that I may mobilize the information in possession of the government in connection with the matter. May I say to him now that we are watching the situation very closely. I cannot say definitely that vt7e were represented at Detroit, but we have been represented at every hearing which has been held in connection with this diversion.

Topic:   CHICAGO DRAINAGE CANAL
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CON

Robert James Manion

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MANION:

Is the minister aware of

the great ill feeling caused at the present time all over the Dominion and especially at the lake ports through the lowering of the water, which is blamed on the Chicago steal?

Topic:   CHICAGO DRAINAGE CANAL
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LIB

Charles A. Stewart (Minister of Immigration and Colonization; Minister of Mines; Minister of the Interior; Superintendent-General of Indian Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. STEWART (West Edmonton):

We

are thoroughly informed about the agitation which is resulting from the diversion, in both Canada and the United States.

Topic:   CHICAGO DRAINAGE CANAL
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CON

January 22, 1926