June 26, 1925

CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

I thought we had the first item on the programme two nights ago. I thought that the interests of the Home Bank depositors had been jeopardized with the idea of getting item number one on the agenda, for that conference. Is that not the case?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

No.

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CON
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

No.

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CON
LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

I think so, before the next session in any event.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Will the government undertake that it be held this year?

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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

Before the next session of parliament, yes.

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Item agreed to. Public Works-chargeable to income-Matane-amount required to complete hart>our improvements, the Ham-mermill Paper Company of Erie, Penn, contributing $100,000-1140,000.


CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

This is for the celebrated Matane wharf. It is to drag $140,000 out of the treasury in one gulp and $4,660 in another. My information about this is that it is absolutely worthless; that not only is it worthless as an enterprise had it been properly handled, but that it has been bungled. What has bean built is now dilapidated, and when it is constructed it will be of use only to the Hammer-mill Paper Company to carry our pulpwood out of Canada and to lose traffic to the Canadian National Railways. I cannot think that even at this sacrifice there is any possibility of electing the hon. member for the constituency.

Supply-Harbours and Rivers

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CON

Henry Lumley Drayton

Conservative (1867-1942)

Sir HENRY DRAYTON:

I really do not think it is fair to the hon. member (Mr Pelletier) that he should not be allowed tc make his speech on this subject. I think we should hear from him. He is the only one who can possibly give any justification for this vote.

M. PELLETIER: Monsieur le president, jo remercie mon honorable ami de m'avoir invite a diseuter Litem 438. Je dois vous dire qu'il est certainement de l'interet, non pas uniquement de Matane, mais aussi de toute cette region, que ce montant soit vote, afin de venir en aide a la population non seule-mernt de ce district mais meme a celle de la cote Nord. *

Mr. Chairman, three years ago we had a vote for this work. There was a revote two years ago, a revote again last year, and part of this is a revote. I have already stated that this work is in the interests of my district as well as in the interests of the north shore. My right hon. friend states that it is only in t'he interests of the Hammermill Paper Company. I do not agree with him.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Does the hon. memfoei

say on the north shore?

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LIB

François Jean Pelletier

Liberal

Mr. PELLETIER:

I state that companies are operating on the north shore, and they want to have their goods come through Matane. Everybody knows, except my right hon. friend apparently, that Matane existea before I came here. Apparently he did not know that.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Oh yes I did, and Matane will exist long after the wharf has rotted, for I am told it is half down now.

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LIB

François Jean Pelletier

Liberal

Mr. PELLETIER:

It might be half down but neither my right hon. friend nor I can prevent rough weather. The work was done according to the plans and specifications, and I am not to blame for that, nor do I blame my right hon. friend. At the same time I want to see that district developed, and I endeavour to do the best I possibly can to come to the assistance of all concerned. Matane was the first harbour to open in March. On the 21st of March the first 'boat came into Matane.

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?

Some hon. MEMBER:

A row boat?

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LIB

François Jean Pelletier

Liberal

Mr. PELLETIER:

No, it was not a row

boat. I am absolutely sincere in this matter. There are five or six different companies operating on the north shore, and from the 21st of March to the 11th of April sixteen vessels came from the north shore to Matane, with 1,700 passengers. There were no other 322

ports open then. Had it not been for the fact that we had begun the work and the improvements, these men who came across from the north shore to Matane would have starved, for the simple reason that they had been on rations for three weeks. I want to state fairly and squarely what the facts are. I have a report here from the collector of customs which I am willing to show to my right hon. friend if he wishes to see it. If my right hon. friend insists on being pessimistic so far as Matane is concerned, I am ready and willing to discuss this matter with him.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I never said anything

pessimistic about Matane. The information I get is that the wharf is absolutely worthless, and it does not matter how many people come to Matane. This is to get the pulpwood of the Hammermill Paper Company across and into the United States, to be manufactured there into pulp and paper, and if it did not go over that wharf, it would go over the Canadian National railway, and we would at least get the freight out of it, even if we would lose all the work of manufacture. I am told besides there is some other concern there for which something has been built, purely assistance to private enterprise, and that a mess has been made of the construction, even though the purpose would not justify its construction. A mess has been made of the whole thing, and now the wharf is dilapidated, half of it down-

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LIB

Thomas Vien

Liberal

Mr. VIEN:

Does my right hon. friend not know that the freight rates on pulpwood from that, point would be absolutely prohibitive, and that consequently the Canadian National line do not lose any freight?

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

Oh, they do carry it,

and lots of it. I only wish the rate was prohibitive, then we would manufacture our own pulp and the province of Quebec would get the work. The hon. member knows that the Canadian National and other railways carry very large quantities of pulpwood, and carry pulpwood right from here. That is going now to be exported from this port, if the wharf is ever built to be any good. In a word, the more use is made of the wharf, the worse for Matane and the district, but, of course, if a mess is made of the wharf, there will be no use made of it. The information I get is not from any distant quarter; it is right from there. I would like to know how much money has been sunk into this thing already If it were any good for Matane, that is in proportion to its cost, nobody would oppose it. I do not think the district gets any too

Supply-Harbours and Rivers

much, but I do not like to see money wasted that might be used usefully for the district.

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June 26, 1925