June 25, 1925

PRO

Robert Gardiner

Progressive

Mr. GARDINER:

The .committee reported progress and the Speaker was in the chair.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB

George Newcombe Gordon (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

The .committee has

risen. The managers have gone and the conference is now taking place. Does the hon. member object to the committee sitting while the conference is proceeding?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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PRO
LIB

George Newcombe Gordon (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

Then why was not the objection raised when the Speaker was in the chair?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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PRO

Robert Gardiner

Progressive

Mr. GARDINER:

The rule is that when the Speaker is in the chiair and a Conference between the two Houses .takes .place, the sitting of the House shall be suspended.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB

George Newcombe Gordon (Deputy Speaker and Chair of Committees of the Whole of the House of Commons)

Liberal

The CHAIRMAN:

The .point of order

should have been raised then. It is too late now; we are in committee. Shall this vote carry?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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PRO

Robert Gardiner

Progressive

Mr. GARDINER:

I presume the employment offices dealt with under this item are operated jointly as between thie provinces and the federal government?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. JAMES MURDOCK (Minister of Labour):

Yes. The employment offices in the various provinces are handled entirely by the provinces, but the federal government provides annually under the Employment Offices Co-ordination Act for a sum to be divided among the respective provinces in proportion to the expenses of the offices in those provinces.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

Last year in the

provincial House very serious 'charges were

made against the way in which the employment bureau was carried on in 'the city of Winnipeg. It was claimed that the officers in charge fixed the wages to be paid to those applying for labour; that in reality certain groups got together and decided what the wage should be, and men were forced to accept that fixed wage. I would like to know what the minister has to say about charges of that character.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MURDOCK:

The point raised by my hon. friend did come to the attention of the federal Labour department and we instituted careful inquiries- It was found that there was some foundation for the allegations in respect of one employee of the Winnipeg office. The department, of course, took the position that that was entirely wrong and that it should not be repeated. The matter was satisfactorily smoothed -out, with a warning to the person concerned that nothing of the kind could be tolerated or .permitted in the future.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

I visited the employment bureau in Winnipeg last year and-found several hundred men in attendance. It seems as if they are bound to report there daily and to hang around on the chance of 'getting an odd job. These were married men, residents of Winnipeg, who were thereby precluded from going out and possibly finding another job or helping about their own homes. Is it not possible to modify the regulations so that a man would have the opportunity to report there and in some way obtain a job if it turned up, without being in 'constant attendance at the office day after day?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MURDOCK:

When jobs are not plentiful many of the unemployed get into the habit of going to the office and hanging around on the 'chance of something turning u.p, and also to talk with their fellows in similar circumstances. But there is no regulation, I am sure, requiring daily or continuous attendance, and if there was such a requirement I would regard it as entirely unnecessary and wrong. Registration, so that the office may know whether the applicant is still ready for work, should be sufficient. Steps are taken to get in touch with applicants at their own homes or at any handy address where they can be reached.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mir. WOODSWORTH:

In the reports issued by the Labour department we have estimates as to the amount of wages lost in the case of industrial disputes. Would it be possible for the Department of Labour to estimate the amount of time lost, and thereby the ap-

Supply-Labour

proximate wages lost, on aocounit of unemployment throughout Canada?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MURDOCK:

No, it would not be possible to make an accurate estimate. There is no way of accurately determining, for instance, how many persons are unemployed at a given time. In England with unemployment doles being paid they can estimate fairly accurately the unemployment situation, but I think all will agree that there are many unemployed in England who would not accept the dole. Here in Canada no accurate estimate such as my hon. friend suggests could be made as to the loss in wages by provinces through unemployment in Canada.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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PRO

Henry Elvins Spencer

Progressive

Mr. SPENCER:

I wish to say a good word with respect to the work being done at the Edmonton employment bureau. That is the office through which I have been getting employees, and I wish to compliment the bureau on the good work it is doing. I rose to get some information with regard to the expense of carrying on these offices. How is the expense divided between the Dominion and provincial governments?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB
PRO

Henry Elvins Spencer

Progressive

Mr. SPENCER:

How many employment bureaus are there throughout Canada?

hlr. MURDOCK: At the present time, 72 offices at 65 centres.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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PRO

Henry Elvins Spencer

Progressive

Mr. SPENCER:

Are any of the provinces continuing private employment bureaus?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Mr. MURDOCK:

Yes, the provinces of Quebec and Ontario Still have a few private employment agencies. Speaking from memory, Ontario has 14, I think, and Quebec, 12 or 14, of these private agencies that were

functioning when the employment service was instituted, and which have continued since that time. In some of the provinces, as hon. members know, legislation has been enacted doing away with private employment agencies, but they still continue in Ontario and Quebec to the number I have mentioned.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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PRO

Henry Elvins Spencer

Progressive

Mr. SPENCER:

It is left entirely to the provincial governments to say whether or not these private bureaus shall be done away with?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   DEPARTMENT OF LABOUR
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June 25, 1925