June 22, 1925

LAB

William Irvine

Labour

Mr. WILLIAM IRVINE (East Calgary):

I notice the Minister of Labour has returned from his mission to the Nova Scotia strike area. Has the minister any statement to make to the House as to the actual conditions in Cape Breton, as to what prospects there are for an immediate settlement of the dispute and a removal of the troops?

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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LIB

James Murdock (Minister of Labour)

Liberal

Hon. JAMES MURDOCK (Minister of Labour):

It would, perhaps, be inadvisable

to make any extended statement in regard to the situation as it exists in Nova Scotia at the present time. As has been stated to the press, the company made a proposal through me to the district board of the United Mine Workers on the 17th of this month and that was presented to the board the next day. When I left Sydney on Friday morning last, the district board were to canvass the proposals for a settlement made by the company with (their locals of the organization and possibly through a referendum, vote of the United Mine Workers, and the decision of the mine workers and, in any case, of the locals will be indicated to the district board within the next few days, when possibly further discussions will be held to ascertain if a settlement can be reached on the basis that is Droposed.

Topic:   QUESTIONS
Subtopic:   MINERS AND STEEL WORKERS
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PRIVILEGE-MR. GUTHRIE


On the Orders of the Day:


CON

Hugh Guthrie

Conservative (1867-1942)

Hon. HUGH GUTHRIE (South Wellington) :

I desire to rise for a moment on a

matter of privilege. On my return to the House of Commons this morning after an absence of about ten weeks, my attention was called to a statement appearing in Hansard of the 16th April last at page 2209, in a speech of the hon. member for Cape Breton South and Richmond (Mr. Kyte), in which speech these expressions are used regarding me:

1920 and 1921 the member for South Wellington (Mr. Guthrie) took a trip to England and his expenses charged up to the government amounted tc $9,400.

Then in the following column:

I do not care what business he was on, he could not eat up $9,400 properly on any such trip.

Had I been in my place when the statement was made, of course I would have put the matter right at that time, but I was absent. The amount referred to is to be found in a return brought down to this House in the session of 1922. It covers the expenses of a trip in the year 1920 and a subsequent trip in the year 1921. In the year 1920, at the request of the government then in power, as Minister of Militia, I went to England to attend a meeting of the Imperial War Graves' Commission which was called in London for the purpose of settling the policy which should pertain in respect of war graves of soldiers of both the Imperial government and the Dominion,. I was also appointed by the Dominion government on that occasion to attend as its representative the international financial meeting at the city of Brussels called by the League of Nations. I attended the meeting of the War. Graves Commission, and subsequently I went to Brussels to attend the meeting of the financial delegation which sat there for, I think, about ten days. Later, I went through the war zone for the purpose of demobilizing a large number of Canadian soldiers who were still at work there. On my return to London I investigated the case of many men who were then on the pay list of Canada and, as I thought, unnecessarily so, and I demobilized the remainder of the Canadian army then in Great Britain with the exception of some twenty-five or thirty men. In the month of June of the following year, I was requested by my leader, then the Prime Minister, to proceed to London in connection with the Imperial conference. I was not actually one of the delegates at the conference, and I think I attended the sittings of the conference on only three occasions. But as a great many matters pertaining to mili-

Rules oj the House

tary subjects, and also the question of air armaments, were to be discussed, I was asked to be present for that purpose. The chief purpose, however, of my visit on the second occasions was to settle outstanding claims between the Ministry of Shipping and the Department of Militia of Canada involving a great many millions of dollars. I took over for the purpose an accountant of the department here, and after four or five weeks of strenuous work we settled all questions save one. As a result of our efforts we succeeded in having the bill of the Ministry of Shipping reduced by several hundred thousand dollars. The amount mentioned by the hon. member for Cape Breton South and Richmond is the total expense of the two trips and not of a single trip, as the House would infer from his statement.

Topic:   PRIVILEGE-MR. GUTHRIE
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SOLICITOR GENERAL AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE


On the Orders of the Day:


PRO

Robert Forke

Progressive

Mr. ROBERT FORKE (Brandon):

Seeing that the portfolio of the Solicitor General is at present vacant, has the government considered the advisability of amalgamating this office with that of the Minister of Justice, thus bringing all legal matters under the one department and, besides, making a large saving in matters of expense?

Topic:   SOLICITOR GENERAL AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

The government has already considered the point which the hon. member has brought up, and will make an announcement a little later of its decision.

Topic:   SOLICITOR GENERAL AND MINISTER OF JUSTICE
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DISTURBANCES IN CHINA


On the Orders of the Day:


LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. J. S. WOODSWORTH (Centre Winnipeg) :

Has the government received any representations from the Chinese Consul regarding the exploitation and shooting of Chinese workers by British soldiers? Has Canada, as i member of the League of Nations, taken any iction looking to the removal of the causes of the present disturbances in China?

Topic:   DISTURBANCES IN CHINA
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Right Hon. W. L. MACKENZIE KING (Prime Minister):

I am not aware of any representations having been received along the lines indicated by my hon. friend. I shall make inquiries at once and see if there have been any.

Topic:   DISTURBANCES IN CHINA
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

Would the Prime Minister be kind enough to answer the second part of my question, as to whether Canada, as a member of the League of Nations, has taken

any action looking to a protest against the causes which have given rise to the troubles in China? As a member of the League of Nations we have a right to act in the matter.

Topic:   DISTURBANCES IN CHINA
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

The troubles in China at the moment are the subject of correspondence between the British government and our own. I am not at liberty at the present time to disclose the nnture of that correspondence, but I can assure the hon. gentleman that so far as Canadian citizens arc concerned the government is taking every precaution to see that their lives and property are safeguarded to the greatest extent possible.

Topic:   DISTURBANCES IN CHINA
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LAB

James Shaver Woodsworth

Labour

Mr. WOODSWORTH:

I hope I have mads myself understood. I was not speaking primarily of taking precautions to preserve the lives of Canadians in China; I was referring to any action the government might have taken to prevent, through the League of Nations, the exploitation of the Chinese which is now taking place and which is likely to cause considerable world trouble. Has our government, as a member of the League of Nations, taken any action at all, and if so what?

Topic:   DISTURBANCES IN CHINA
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LIB

William Lyon Mackenzie King (Prime Minister; President of the Privy Council; Secretary of State for External Affairs)

Liberal

Mr. MACKENZIE KING:

As a member of the league the government has not taken any action such as my hon. friend suggests. It is rather a large subject and at the moment I can only promise to see that the matter will be taken into consideration.

Topic:   DISTURBANCES IN CHINA
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LIB

George Perry Graham (Minister of Railways and Canals)

Liberal

Mr. GRAHAM:

Why not inquire into

Chinese attacks on the British?

Topic:   DISTURBANCES IN CHINA
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RULES OF THE HOUSE REPORT OP SPECIAL COMMITTEE


On the Orders of the Day:


June 22, 1925