June 17, 1925

DEATH OF MR. T. H. THOMPSON, M.P.

LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

I have the honour to inform the House that I have received the following letter:

Members of the House of Commons,

Your kind expressions of sympathy are deeply appreciated and gratefully acknowledged.

Mrs. T. H. Thompson and daughter.

. REPORTS

Mr. SPEAKER presented the report of the Editor of Debates on the paid circulation of Hansard as affected by the publicity ordered by the House of Commons on recommendation of the committee on Debates as follows:

Ottawa, June 17, 1925.

To His Honour

The Speaker of the House of Commons.

Sir:-We have the honour to report the procedure and results of the effort to increase the paid circulation of Hansard which was ordered by the House.

Reports

The command of the House was given by adopting on July 3rd last the report of the Debates Committee submitted by Mr. Boivin, Chairman, on 30th June. The report read in part as follows:-

"Your Committee have had under consideration certain recommendations providing for a wider and more general distribution of the unrevised edition of Debates at the actual cost of the extra printing, paper and mailing, which has been ascertained to be approximately three dollars per session.

"Your committee recommend that the required steps be taken by the proper officers to inform the general public that the said unrevised edition of debates is available to subscribers, and will be mailed to them daily, upon application to the King's Printer, at the said rate of three dollars per session."

Consulting with Your Honour we were instructed that the members of the editorial staff of Debates were the "proper officers" to carry out this duty. We prepared a plan which, when approved by the Chairman of the Debates Committee, was put in execution. The plan was to ask members of the House for lists of names of those in their several constituencies likely to be interested and then to circularize the partie so named.

We append to this report copies of the printed forms used in this work.

Letters to members of Parliament were mailed January 25 to February 1, those most distant from Ottawa being first. In response 52 lists of names were received, the total number of names being 2,121, an average of about 40 per list. Circulars were promptly sent to the parties named.

When this matter was under discussion in the Debates Committee several members expressed the opinion that the press would probably take an interest in the movement and would promote the circulation of Hansard. Acting on this suggestion we communicated with the Canadian Press, the resident members of the Press Gallery, and others. The result was that Hansard as a subscription proposition was mentioned in many papers from coast to coast. Editorial articles recommending the purchase and reading of Hansard were published by some of the foremost newspapers, including those of Montreal, Toronto, Winnipeg and Vancouver.

A special notice was published by the U.F.A. advising readers to send for free booklet explanatory of Hansard. About 100 letters were received as a direct result of this article. Copies of the booklet herewith and samples of Hansard, together with return envelopes were sent to the parties who wrote.

In all, letters were sent to about 2,400 prospective subscribers.

In every case the party was asked to send his subscription direct to the King's Printer.

It was not possible to "key" these items of publicity in such a way as to trace results in detail. But it would seem that the movement as a whole was markedly successful. The King's Printer advises us that.whereas the paid list of Hansard up to the end of last session was about 700; the present list is 1,245. In judging of this result it is necessary to allow for the fact that of recent years there has been a steady, though slow, growth in the number of Hansard subscribers. The experience with regard to the plan as above would indicate that further publicity would greatly increase the number of Hansard subscribers.

We have the honour to be, Sir,

Your obediant servants,

A. C. Campbell,

Editor of Debates. George Simpson,

Associate Editor of Debates.

Marcel Gabard,

Associate Editor of Debates.

Fifth report of the select standing committee on Railways, Canals and Telegraph Lines.- Mr. Hughes (for Mr. Cahill).

Topic:   DEATH OF MR. T. H. THOMPSON, M.P.
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CANADA GRAIN ACT- AMENDMENT


Mr. W. F. KAY (Missisquoi) presented the fifth and sixth reports of the select standing committee on Agriculture and Colonization, as follows: House of Commons, June 17, 1925. The select standing committee on Agriculture and Colonization beg leave to present the fifth report of the said committee, which is as follows:- Your committee have had under consideration Bill No. 113, An Act Respecting Grain, and have agreed to report the same with amendments. All of which is respectfully submitted. W. F. Kay, Chairman. House of Commons, June 17, 1925. The Select Standing Committee on Agriculture and Colonization beg leave to present the sixth Report of the said committee, which is as follows; Your committee have had under consideration Bill No. 113, An Act respecting Grain, and have unanimously adopted the following resolution relating thereto, namely: "That the Committee on Agriculture and Colonization strongly recommends to the government, that, in order that the provisions of Bill 113, An Act respecting Grain, may be made applicable to the whole Dominion of Canada without any possible doubt whatever, steps be taken by this government to approach the governments of the several provinces, and more particularly those provinces concerned with the growing of western grain, with the object of having necessary concurrent or enabling legislation passed by such provinces, to place beyond doubt, as far as is possible, the constitutionality of the said act or any of the provisions thereof." W. F. Kay, Chairman.


FINANCIAL CREDIT


Mr. THOMAS VIEN (Lotbiniera) moved that the fourth report of the select standing committee on Banking and Commerce be concurred in.


CON
LIB

Thomas Vien

Liberal

Mr. YIEN:

The report reads as follows:

In obedience to the order of your honourable house, of the twenty-third day of March last, your committee have had under consideration the question of the basis, function and control of financial credit, and the relation of credit to commerce and industry, and beg leave t") present the following as their fourth report:

Whereas commerce and industry suffer greatly by reason of periodic changes in the purchasing power of money and

Whereas it is generally recognized that the best results are likely to follow from co-operative action towards this end on the part of a number of nations;

Therefore be it resolved:

That this committee recommend to the House that the Canadian delegates to the League of Nations be instructed to bring this matter before the league, at the earliest opportunity, in order that the subject may be discussed and, if possible, such concerted action taken by the various nations within the league as shall be best calculated to bring about the desired end.

Financial Credit

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IND

William Charles Good

Independent Progressive

Mr. W. C. GOOD (Brant):

I desire to

draw the attention, of the House to one phrase in the substantive part of this resolution which I think as rather unfortunate; and in that connection I am' going to suggest a slight amendment which I believe will meet with the approval of the House. Hon. members will notice in the latter part of the resolution these words "by the various nations within the league." Now at the present time the United States is without the league. It is very desirable, indeed, I think hon. gentlemen will admit, that the United States should not be excluded from such a conference. There are also some other large and important nations which might be excluded if this phrase were allowed to stand as it is. I submitted the resolution to Professor Irving Fisher, who has taken a very great interest in this matter and is very well informed, and asked him to make any comments that he thought fit to make upon it. He wrote me, under date June 1. suggesting the replacing of these words "within the league" by the words "throughout the world." That would allow the inclusion of the United States or any other nation that might now be for one reason or other outside of the league. It seems to me this minor amendment would make the conference much more effective and ought to be concurred in by the House unanimously. I take it that the hon. member who moved concurrence would be quite agreeable to -this change. At all events I recommend its acceptance.

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LIB

Thomas Vien

Liberal

Mr. VIEN:

If I am quite in order, in

making an explanation, I may state that this matter has been the subject of careful study by the Banking and Commerce committee for five or six days, and as a result of their deliberations the committee reported that our delegates to the League of Nations should first take this matter up with the various nations within the league, for the league, or the council of the league, to take whatever action they saw fit with reference to the other nations that are not within the league, if such action is deemed advisable. Therefore, that is the reason the committee reported that the best we could do at the present moment was to recommend that our delegates be instructed to bring this to the attention of the League of Nations.

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IND

William Charles Good

Independent Progressive

Mr. GOOD:

My hon. friend misunderstands the point which I brought to the attention of the House. I am not objecting at all to the action which he suggests. If my hon. friend will look at the latter part of the sentence he will see that it says:

JMr. Vien.]

Such concerted action taken by the various nations within the league.

Now the proposition is to introduce the matter through the league, but this resolution as worded limits subsequent action to those nations now within the league. I think that is unfortunate. I think this particular point was not definitely considered at the meeting to which my hon. friend has referred. It is quite true that the matter was debated in a general way, but this particular amendment was not then considered.

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LIB
IND

William Charles Good

Independent Progressive

Mr. GOOD:

I should like to move that

the words "within the league" in the second last line be struck out and that the words "throughout the world" be substituted therefor.

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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

' The amendment is out of order. The amendment, if there is any, should aSk that instructions be given to -the committee that the report be referred back The amendment cannot be made in the House.

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LIB

James Alexander Robb (Minister of Immigration and Colonization)

Liberal

Mr. ROBB:

May I suggest that if the

.resolution as presented to the House with the findings of the Banking and Commerce committee is not satisfactory to all members, we might refer the matter back for further consideration.

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CON
IND

William Charles Good

Independent Progressive

Mr. GOOD:

If my suggestion does not

meet with the general approval of the House, I do not wish to press it. It seems to me that it should meet with unanimous approval.

Topic:   FINANCIAL CREDIT
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LIB

Hewitt Bostock (Speaker of the Senate)

Liberal

Mr. SPEAKER:

There is nothing before the House except the report and concurrence ,in the report.

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CON

Arthur Meighen (Leader of the Official Opposition)

Conservative (1867-1942)

Mr. MEIGHEN:

I presume it is of importance to know that the report of the committee is satisfactory to the committee itself before we are asked to concur in it, but it is at least of equal importance to know that it is satisfactory to the government. Apparently if this motion is to carry-and I do not see any sign of demurring on the part of the administration-this government is to undertake to bring up a subject before the League of Nations and apparently the hon. member for Brant (Mr, Good) feels that in order to give it even additional force we ought to take steps to constitute a newer and larger League of Nations.

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IND

June 17, 1925